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By Michael Chabon, this won a Pultizer Prize last year or the year before. Daring, adventurous novel about a couple of young Jewish boys in WWII-era New York City, who collaborate on a new super-hero for the fledgling comic book industry. I couldn't put it down. This is not a novel about comic books, it's very serious - one of the boys escapes Nazi-occupied Europe and plows all his earnings into efforts to bring his family over to join him. Yet the author uses some of the techniques of comic books in interesting ways - cliff-hangers, and abrupt startling plot twists. I couldn't possibly explain why we spend 50 or more pages in Antarctica, for example.

Definitely a worthwhile read.
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jh21045 added to your Favorite Fools list.

Definitely one of my favorite writers. "Wonder Boys" is excellent
(the movie was ok, but the book puts you in the head of a writer who is losing control; simply hilarious)

His short stories are also interesting but a bit more experimental
in some ways and an acquired taste.

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Gonna have to pick this one up, only one of his I read is Mysteries of Pittsburg, it was really good.
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I just read this - my dad, born a Jew in '39 in NYC, made me <g>. But I really enjoyed it, it's a good tale and even though it's not "about" the comics, it sort of is. It gives the modern reader an idea of the cultural impact of comic books, which I think those of us who grew up on Archie and Richie Rich don't really get. Also an interesting "slice of life" about the growth of the outer NY boroughs.

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...even though it's not "about" the comics, it sort of is. It gives the modern reader an idea of the cultural impact of comic books, which I think those of us who grew up on Archie and Richie Rich don't really get.

Yes. Good point.

I wanted to downplay the comics connection a little because of my own background: I've been a hardcore comic book fan for over 25 years, and there are a number of neat little touches in the book that I was in a great postion to "get". Stan Lee and some other giants make cameos, and you can draw intriguing parallels between the characters in the novel and some figures from comics history: Lee/Kirby, Siegel/Schuster, etc. And the whole Fred Wertham/Seduction of the Innocent thing. But I didn't want to scare away a broader readership. You definitely don't need to be a comics fan for the novel to appeal to you.
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But I didn't want to scare away a broader readership. You definitely don't need to be a comics fan for the novel to appeal to you.


Right, that's understandable. Actually I think the the reverse is almost true. I am definitely not a comics fan, never have been, and it was something to be treated to a well-done declaration of why and how the comic as art form both reflected and contributed to our national identity.

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