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It is rather routine to see offbeat cars on the streets of Motown, a variety of camo swathed prototypes, like the 4 door Mustang I saw last fall and the constant parade of SUVs, engineering mules, like the European Mk II Ford Focus, which was never sold here, and other oddities.

Saw one of "the other oddities" today, a Changan CS55 SUV.

How's your Mandarin?

Changan CS55 exterior and interior detailed review Part 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RZJVXpoiik&fbclid=IwAR2...

There had been no attempt to conceal what it was. No camo. "Changan" was lettered out on the front of the hood, and the tailgate sported the Changan "V" logo.

So, was this one of the big three checking it out for "competition research"? Is Changan sniffing at the US market?

The fall off in Chinese auto sales, and the overbuilt production capacity of the Chinese industry have been reported. Changan, like most big Chinese automakers, is government controlled. Given those facts, the Chinese government could be tempted to establish Changan, and GAC (which has had a stand at the Detroit auto show for the last several years) in the US market and dump cars here at ludicrously low prices to "create jobs" in China. The US already levies tariffs of 27.5% on Chinese cars and 25% on trucks. Real, provable, Chinese dumping in the US could result in even higher tariffs, but the Chinese may cut the prices enough to offset even higher tariffs, as keeping people working is cheaper than having them sitting at home, getting mad about the situation.

Steve
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Real, provable, Chinese dumping in the US could result in even higher tariffs, but the Chinese may cut the prices enough to offset even higher tariffs, as keeping people working is cheaper than having them sitting at home, getting mad about the situation.

Given the Chinese proclivity for crappy quality in complicated assemblies, it's hard to imagine a Chinese vehicle gaining any strong foothold in the US. It ain't happening.

Think: USSR YUGO. Then triple it.

Do you think the Boeing 737MAX8 is a problem? Wait till Chinese-built airplanes fill the skies. You ain't seen nuttin' yet.
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Given the Chinese proclivity for crappy quality in complicated assemblies, it's hard to imagine a Chinese vehicle gaining any strong foothold in the US. It ain't happening.

The Buick Envision is built in China. Consumer Reports praises it's "well finished" interior. Their owner survey reports average reliability and owner satisfaction.

The long wheelbase Volvo S90 is built in China.

The typical big three model, whether built in the US or Mexico, contains a significant portion of Chinese parts. The big three started buying Chinese parts in the early 2000s. US auto plants use so many Chinese parts, the Chinese companies have started opening production plants in North America.

We shouldn't be surprised at how quickly the Chinese have closed the gap with the rest of the world. US and European automakers have been teaching their Chinese JV partners how to design and build cars for 20 years.

Steve
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Given the Chinese proclivity for crappy quality in complicated assemblies, it's hard to imagine a Chinese vehicle gaining any strong foothold in the US. It ain't happening.

We were told the same thing about Japanese autos.


-=Ajax=-
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No. of Recommendations: 24
I have been in numerous automobiles in China - both built there by foreign manufacturers (VW, Audi, Mercedes, Toyota etc.) as well as Chinese brands. I have not seen any particular deficiency in the Chinese branded and the foreign branded vehicles.

Bear in mind, the Chinese make our laptops, mobile phones, down coats, etc. - as well as being the headquarters country of Huawei, the largest manufacturer of network gear in the world. Don't let biases developed when Mao was in power make you underestimate their ability to build high quality complicated technologically advanced products.

For those of you who have never visited China, the street are not filled with coolies wearing sandals and sporting long braided cues, but by hordes of industrious workers dressed in Western clothing carrying mobile phones which offer functionality we can only wish for in the US.

Their society is very different than ours, but there are quite a few products where I seek out Chinese versions as being superior to ours.

I can see buying an expensive US car rather than an inexpensive Chinese car as an expression of patriotism, (but then buying an expensive Japanese or European model doesn't count), but buying it based on a difference in quality is based more on attitude than reality.

For the US to compete, in the absence of trade barriers, we have to build more efficient and smarter factories which substitute AI and automation for people - just like the Chinese are in the process of building right now.

Jeff
(Who would have no issues in buying a technically superior, cheaper Chinese car)
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We were told the same thing about Japanese autos.

And the Koreans.
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Given the Chinese proclivity for crappy quality in complicated assemblies, it's hard to imagine a Chinese vehicle gaining any strong foothold in the US. It ain't happening.

Yeah, that iPhone assembly is a breeze.

Think: USSR YUGO. Then triple it.


If you don’t know the difference between production in the USSR and China, you have no business commenting on business.
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Given the Chinese proclivity for crappy quality in complicated assemblies, it's hard to imagine a Chinese vehicle gaining any strong foothold in the US. It ain't happening.

Think: USSR YUGO. Then triple it.

Do you think the Boeing 737MAX8 is a problem? Wait till Chinese-built airplanes fill the skies. You ain't seen nuttin' yet.

=============================================

But - look at all their advanced engineering and technology already

High speed rail
Nuclear power plants
Hydroelectric dams
Rockets, satellites and space program
Electronics and computers
Military weapons

“We will fully implement our plan for developing strategic emerging industries,” Premier Li Keqiang said in his annual speech to the National People’s Congress on Sunday. “We will accelerate R. & D. on and commercialization of new materials, artificial intelligence, integrated circuits, bio-pharmacy, 5G mobile communications and other technologies, and develop industrial clusters in these fields.”

In addition to the sectors Mr. Li cited, the plan also covers the manufacturing of aircraft, robots, electric cars, rail equipment, ships and agricultural machinery. China seeks to wean itself off imports from companies like Boeing, Airbus, General Electric, Siemens, Nissan, Renault, Samsung and Intel.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/07/business/china-trade-manu...

jaagu
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I follow these guys on YouTube. An American and South African who have lived and worked in China for years (and married Chinese wives). They ride around on motorcycles giving commentary on living and working in China.

Here they tour the local car dealerships and talk about Chinese cars. Its from 2016.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1At2H-lIJog
They had some issues with the audio on this video.

Spiffy
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But - look at all their advanced engineering and technology already

High speed rail
Nuclear power plants
Hydroelectric dams
Rockets, satellites and space program
Electronics and computers
Military weapons


Think maybe it has something to do with the priority they give to actually learning something in college, vs playing football?

STEM graduates have become a vital cog in the wheel of global prosperity and unsurprisingly, China is leading the way. The World Economic Forum reported that China had 4.7 million recent STEM graduates in 2016. India, another academic powerhouse, had 2.6 million new STEM graduates last year while the U.S. had 568,000.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2017/02/02/the-co...

US STEM graduates barely outnumber the Russkies, and we don't have all that huge a lead over Iran.

Steve
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STEM graduates have become a vital cog in the wheel of global prosperity and unsurprisingly, China is leading the way.

====================================

We are falling behind rapidly:

3/12/2019

Ho K. Nieh, director of the NRC’s Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, offered a quick look at the demographics of the NRC staff. “In February of this year,” he said, “with roughly 2,900 staff on board, we have 24% of our staff eligible to retire now, 38% eligible in three years, and 42% eligible in four years.” The agency increasingly consists of a diminishing number of very experienced staff and an increasing number of new employees, with few in the middle to fill the ranks of future project managers and agency leaders.

https://www.powermag.com/myhrvold-pushes-advanced-nuclear-at...

jaagu
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Great video :-)
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I just attended a founder's Day" event at my high school - which has always specialized in STEM (Brooklyn Technical High School). Currently the demographics of its 6,000 person student body (admitted by competitive entrance exam) are 17% Black/Latino, 20% Caucasian, 63% Asian. They are proud to have beaten their arch-rivals at Stuyvesant High School (which has a higher proportion of Asians, but a much smaller student population) in the city ping pong championship. Both schools rank among the best in the nation, more than 40% of both school's populations live below the poverty line and over 99% of both school's graduates go on to a four year college (the majority to Ivy League schools with full scholarships).

Jeff
(I guess our Chinese are as good as those on the other side of the pond:-)
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1At2H-lIJog
They had some issues with the audio on this video.

Spiffy


1. Great video. Crash tests might have been a primary highlight.(?)
(Audio WAS a little jumbled, but I managed to listen thru it.)

AND

2. I rest my case.
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OrmontUS comments: Great video :-)

Here they tour a ghost city and touch on the economics of the Chinese real estate bubble (from 2016):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcyYyyaPz84

And then do an update which is eye-opening (from 2018):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XopSDJq6w8E

Both videos are well worth the time to watch.

Spiffy
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Here they tour a ghost city and touch on the economics of the Chinese real estate bubble (from 2016):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcyYyyaPz84

And then do an update which is eye-opening (from 2018):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XopSDJq6w8E



That's what happens if you have tons of capital and nowhere productive to invest it.
In order to keep the economy going, you have destroy it.
I prefer Keynes' solution of "burying money in coal mines".
That's less environmentally destructive than erecting vast cities of crappy buildings that no one can live in and that fall down after a few years.
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