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No. of Recommendations: 14
Perhaps the discussion could be here ? Then disinterested people could just ignore the thread.
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"Perhaps the discussion could be here ? Then disinterested people could just ignore the thread."

*************************************************************************

You could always start a new board for the discussion of EVs - both utilization of the things as well
as the various investment premises - batteries, charging stations, manufacturers, recycling of
the battery metals, mining of the lithium, the lives of the miners and chemical workers.

Certainly enough for a fairly wide discussion for those really interested.

Howie52
retirement investing does not seem to be a really good fit - but threads come and threads go.
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I am one of the disinterested....
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I don’t really care about EV either. Seems like this would be the best board:

https://boards.fool.com/buying-and-maintaining-a-car-100143....
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You could always start a new board for the discussion of EVs - both utilization of the things as well as the various investment premises - batteries, charging stations, manufacturers, recycling of the battery metals, mining of the lithium, the lives of the miners and chemical workers.

METAR would love that.

PSU
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All of which gets thoroughly discussed on the premium TSLA board.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
Gives you a clue as to the dearth of substantive "Retirement Investing" issues to talk about.
And, sadly, a lot of the Retirement Investing questions that do come up could be handled by the OP just doing a google search.

If you think this is bad, try the Berkshire Hathaway board. Every once in a great while somebody brings up Berkshire Hathaway.
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No. of Recommendations: 11
All of which gets thoroughly discussed on the premium TSLA board.

I think Tesla owners are like vegans.
Q: How can you tell if someone is a Vegan?
A: Don’t worry, They’ll Tell you.

Tesla's come up in every darn Motley Fool board I follow.
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Not everyone posting on the premium TSLA board is pro-Tesla and lots of us certainly don't own one.
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Scotty has thoughts about Teslas and EV cars in general. (First 5 1/2 minutes)
Scotty Kilmer 1,471,401,613 (!!!) views.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkDdMtmNJSc
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No. of Recommendations: 7
All of which gets thoroughly discussed on the premium TSLA board.

Which isn't available to those who, like me, do not have access to the premium TSLA board.

--Peter
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"You could always start a new board for the discussion of EVs - both utilization of the things as well as the various investment premises - batteries, charging stations, manufacturers, recycling of the battery metals, mining of the lithium, the lives of the miners and chemical workers.METAR would love that.PSU"

You dang kids get off of my grass.

Andy
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No. of Recommendations: 3

You dang kids get off of my grass.


Just bought some grass at the local pot dispensary to help with sleeping with new knee replacement. Not sure it did much but I did notice my dishwashing machine talking to me. . .
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Just bought some grass at the local pot dispensary to help with sleeping with new knee replacement. Not sure it did much but I did notice my dishwashing machine talking to me. . .

———————
Your dishwasher talks? Is it electric or gas?

Bill
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Is it electric or gas?

Gas, lots of gas.💨

Pete
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I think that anyone that is denying EV's are going to be the future just haven't been reading the news. Even the Transportation bill has money being spent, if passed, for electric vehicle chargers.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases...

Build a national network of electric vehicle (EV) chargers along highways and in rural and disadvantaged communities. The largest investment in EV infrastructure in history, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework will accomplish the President’s goal of building 500,000 EV chargers.

Electrical vehicles are really not a Republican/Democrat thing its more of a technology change that everyone will adopt eventually as the network gets better. It's like Cell phones when they came along. There were always the luddite's that said they would never own a cell phone. I even had a co-worker say that he was not important enough to have a cell phone. Eventually he had one. So yes this will affect every portion of your life, including Retirement. Transportation always has a profound impact on society.

Andy
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Sooner or later the profit motive should kick in and there will be privately owned charging stations. But it's hard to compute with free. At one time I thought truck stops were a natural. I think my brain may have been misfiring.
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Build a national network of electric vehicle (EV) chargers along highways and in rural and disadvantaged communities

I am generally in favor of the Federal Government *(or other, when the Feds fail) pushing forward on infrastructure and other “bigs”, but this aspect seems a hopeless waste of money.

If there are two groups who are going to be last, last, last on the trend, it will be “rural and disadvantaged communities.” Rural, because they need “mileage”. Disadvantaged, because they don’t tend to buy “new”, which puts them another 7-10 years behind trend *anyway*.

I suppose both Red America and Black America would complain if you openly said “You come later”, but the reality is there are going to be a lot of empty charging stations in these areas.
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No. of Recommendations: 7
I think that anyone that is denying EV's are going to be the future just haven't been reading the news.

I'm not sure anyone here has been arguing for that. I know I haven't.

The problem with EVs is that the future isn't here yet. They don't work for everyone. Currently, they probably don't work for over half of the population. There are several hurdles still to overcome. I am fairly sure most of those hurdles will be overcome - some in the near future, some may take a decade or more.

Yes, some of those hurdles are infrastructure issues, such as availability and speed of charging stations.

Some might (or might not) benefit from regulation. For example, there are two different standards for the plug used to charge EVs. There's the Tesla standard, and there's everyone else. This reminds me of the BETA/VHS wars. Beta was, in many ways, the superior format. But because Sony refused to license it, everyone else used VHS. Beta lost, not because it was inferior but because it wasn't available. Tesla fans will argue the same way about the charging interface. Yes, Tesla's has some advantages. But if it isn't available on other EVs, that standard will fail. Part of putting together a charging infrastructure is having a standard charging interface. Charging stations need to charge all EVs, not just some of them. It's too expensive to have a duplicate charging infrastructure - one for Tesla and one for everyone else. Tesla needs to allow their interface to be used on other vehicles, or it will fail and regulators will require their funds to be used only for their standard interface. Tesla also needs to consider that, while their interface might have some genuine benefits, are those benefits widely applicable. Are there drawbacks to that interface that might make a less-sophisticated interface more useful to more people? (Beta had a better picture, but VHS could run for 2 hours or more and contain a whole movie with no interruption to change tapes.) Could they propose an add-on to the other format which would remain compatible while allowing something like a home charger to take advantage of their semi-proprietary improvement?

I've rambled on too long. Just look at the length of that paragraph. Horrible. But I'm too lazy to edit it at the moment, so I'm letting it be. Hopefully the gist of my thoughts will come through.

--Peter
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Sooner or later the profit motive should kick in and there will be privately owned charging stations. But it's hard to compute with free.

The capital invested in creating the charging stations may come from taxpayers, but the actual charging is going to come out of the EV owners' pockets.
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There's the Tesla standard, and there's everyone else.

Everyone else is spread among three different standards. And Tesla owners can get adapters that let them use the others.

But if [Tesla's] isn't available on other EVs, that standard will fail.

At the moment Tesla's is the only one that is measurably successful.

Tesla Will Allow Other Cars To Charge At Norway Superchargers. That’s A Big Deal

https://www.forbes.com/sites/bradtempleton/2021/06/24/tesla-...

FYI, Norway is probably the country farthest along in converting to EVs.

This March, electric vehicles accounted for 56% of all new car registrations, up 23.7% from the same month in 2020.
https://www.electrive.com/2021/04/07/norway-registers-84-8-m...

Tesla needs to allow their interface to be used on other vehicles, or it will fail and regulators will require their funds to be used only for their standard interface.

I don't think anyone, especially Tesla, expects the government sponsored charging structure to cater to Tesla at all. They will use one or more of the other standards. But, as I mentioned already, with the right adapter a Tesla can use the other standards.

A few years ago - long enough ago I could not come up with a citation amidst all the noise, Musk offered to allow Tesla's charging standard to be shared by other manufacturers. In other words, share the plug design and related standards. I don't know what Tesla asked for in return, but nobody took them up on the offer.
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It has been announced that there will be some kind of deal allowing non-Teslas to use the superchargers next year.
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No. of Recommendations: 7
Everyone else is spread among three different standards.

I've got to push back on that. The standard connector, used by every EV maker in the US but one, is the SAE J1772. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAE_J1772 . Other countries have different standards, but this appears to be a US focused discussion.

Here's another description of charging connectors:
https://evcharging.enelx.com/resources/blog/552-ev-charging-...
It includes pictures of the different connectors and where in the world they are used. Perhaps this is the source of three different connectors you mention. There's one standard for the US and Japan, one for China, and one for everywhere else. And then there's Tesla.

I believe this standard has been in use in the US since about 2010.

So, no. There are not three different standard besides Tesla. Just one. At least in the US.

Tesla owners can get adapters that let them use the others.

My understanding is that Tesla provides an adapter with every vehicle sold in the US to allow Teslas to use the industry standard SAE J1772 connector.

If you want a longer video discussion of EV charging, here's a pretty good one. Fair warning - he's not a Tesla fanboi, but he does like EVs in general.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMxB7zA-e4Y

--Peter
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It has been announced that there will be some kind of deal allowing non-Teslas to use the superchargers next year.

Which most have been capable of doing for some time. That standard connector I mentioned, the SAE J1772, includes optional DC charging. The circular part of the connector has the ground and AC lines, along with a bit of control circuitry. But it can be extended to include DC connectors - which is all the Tesla superchargers are - more power delivered via DC instead of AC.

All that is needed is for the superchargers to be able to communicate via those control lines as to what voltage the non-Tesla needs and what is the maximum current the vehicle can accept. That's already there, as the different Tesla models have different battery voltages (I think - I might be wrong there) and different power maximums. (I'm not sure if the different battery options on various Teslas change the overall voltage or amperage, or both. I think it's both, but I'll defer to those with more knowledge there.) At any rate, the capability is already there since different
Teslas need different DC charging parameters.

--Peter
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The big EV question is, Where is the electricity going to come from? There are no electricity wells that you can pump it from.
I think the biggest problem for EVs is that the power requirements just don't scale.

California nowadays has trouble keeping the lights on reliably. Heck, even Texas had major grid failures in last winter's storms.

When there are only a few EVs in an area, not a big deal. When every house in an area has 2 EV cars, will the electric network support the wattage draw to charge them all overnight? What happens when peak usage period is no longer 10AM to 9PM but is 6PM to 3AM? Wind and solar? Wind is calmer at night and the sun isn't shining at night.

Near as I can see, EV proponents either ignore or dance around this issue.
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The problem with EVs is that the future isn't here yet. They don't work for everyone. Currently, they probably don't work for over half of the population. There are several hurdles still to overcome. I am fairly sure most of those hurdles will be overcome - some in the near future, some may take a decade or more.

I disagree with this Peter. Over 82 percent of people live near the population centers in the United States.

https://www.statista.com/statistics/269967/urbanization-in-t...

Most people don't commute further than 90 minutes to work each way.

https://bestmattress-brand.org/comatose-commuters/

So with that being said I think electric does work for most people. My next car will be an electric vehicle but I expect, like most people, when I bought my last car in 2018 I wasn't ready for the plunge. So it will be in 2028 or maybe 2031 before I get an electric vehicle. Also by then I am sure they will have a standard or ways for people to use all the electric charging stations. Like RH said, tesla has a plug conversion and that is not to hard to do. I wired up my own 220 volt plug converter for my welder.

As far as range anxiety goes. I have thought about that too. If I fly were I go I am going to get a rental anyway and if I decide to drive and they don't have the infrastructure yet, just rent a car. But for everyday use I think an electric car will work great. I also want to look into solar panels with a battery back up. They say that some of them will allow you to use a car as battery back up to your house. Not Tesla though. That would be a big plus if you lose power.

Andy
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Just bought some grass at the local pot dispensary to help with sleeping with new knee replacement. Not sure it did much but I did notice my dishwashing machine talking to me. . .

The blue gummy ones work best for that.

Andy
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No. of Recommendations: 17
I disagree with this Peter. Over 82 percent of people live near the population centers in the United States.
Most people don't commute further than 90 minutes to work each way.


But there's more to it than just that.

How many people can't afford more than $5k - $10k for a used car? How many people can't charge their car overnight because they have to park on the street or somewhere else where charging isn't readily available? How many people need to carry significant tools to work (no one actually has a truck available yet, although at least 3 are getting very close). And once a truck is available, how many can afford a new one?

Speaking of the used market, how much life is left in a 7 to 10 year old EV battery? And how much will it cost to replace that battery when it eventually fails?

I'm not claiming much here. Just that EVs don't work - yet - for a lot of people. I'm not saying they'll never work for them. But they don't work now based on financial or operational factors.

--Peter
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How many people can't afford more than $5k - $10k for a used car? How many people can't charge their car overnight because they have to park on the street or somewhere else where charging isn't readily available? How many people need to carry significant tools to work (no one actually has a truck available yet, although at least 3 are getting very close). And once a truck is available, how many can afford a new one?

Ford is selling their Lightning next year so the truck hurdle is gone and as far as affordability, I have heard it will start at 40000. Maybe that is bull but we will see. Also if you have a power outage it will power your house. That is what I was waiting for. I have to think this through but I may trade in my Dodge 3500.

https://www.ford.com/trucks/f150/f150-lightning/2022/

Speaking of the used market, how much life is left in a 7 to 10 year old EV battery? And how much will it cost to replace that battery when it eventually fails?

Ford has a warranty on the battery for 8 years that it will hold a 70 percent charge. Now how much it will cost to replace it I can't say. Right now I believe it is around 10000 but in 8 years it could be much cheaper.

I'm not claiming much here. Just that EVs don't work - yet - for a lot of people. I'm not saying they'll never work for them. But they don't work now based on financial or operational factors.

Right I understand what you are saying but what I am saying it is becoming a tipping point. We are almost at the top and when it goes over the top it is going to pick up speed and more people are going to adopt electric. If they get the autonomous going than it is game over because the people you are talking about buying cars for 10000 dollars won't even own a car. Just call an EV to come pick them up and take them where ever. That will free up alot of their money for other things to buy.

Andy
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Also if you have a power outage it will power your house.

Thereby draining your car's battery. Better hope you won't need to go anywhere.
If you really want to power your home in an outage, you'd be better off with a generator. ex: 10,000-Watt Electric Start Portable Generator... $1,099 https://www.ebay.com/itm/202518309513


Speaking of the used market, how much life is left in a 7 to 10 year old EV battery?

7 to 10 years less than it started with.


And how much will it cost to replace that battery when it eventually fails?

Nothing.
Because nobody is going to pay $8,000-$10,000 to replace the failed battery in a 10-15 year old car. That's more than the car is worth.

Ahhhh, how much is, say, a well-regarded 10 years old used car worth?
"In CARFAX Used Car Listings, you can find a used 2000 Toyota Camry for sale from $3,295 to $5,990."

Assuming that you can even get a battery for that old of a car. The battery is a major component, and the manufacturers will change & upgrade them, so they may well not even be available anymore.
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If you really want to power your home in an outage, you'd be better off with a generator. ex: 10,000-Watt Electric Start Portable Generator... $1,099

A question for those with some experience with both generators and outages (I only have the latter):

How much gas/propane on a continuing basis would this generator need to be fed to power say, your average 2000-3000 sg ft home? If an outage were to last a week, what would the stores of gas or propane be needed?

Pete
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The capital invested in creating the charging stations may come from taxpayers, but the actual charging is going to come out of the EV owners' pockets.

Interesting that VW's cheating on emissions is helping to pay for building of charging stations.

https://deq.nc.gov/volkswagen-settlement/level-2
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How much gas/propane on a continuing basis would this generator need to be fed to power say, your average 2000-3000 sg ft home? If an outage were to last a week, what would the stores of gas or propane be needed?

The Building/Maintaining a Home board is a good place for such questions, and related subjects have come up recently. Some very sharp people hang out there.

https://boards.fool.com/home-generator-which-manufacturer-34...

https://boards.fool.com/generator-basic-question-34857940.as...
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No. of Recommendations: 9
The big EV question is, Where is the electricity going to come from? There are no electricity wells that you can pump it from.
I think the biggest problem for EVs is that the power requirements just don't scale.
...
Near as I can see, EV proponents either ignore or dance around this issue.


Nope. Ramping up the electricity needed for EVs is not a big issue and advocates do not ignore it.
But the issue is not that big. Here's the math.
The average home uses a bit over 10,000 kwh per year.
This is about 20% of total electrical use (commercial and industrial are the other 80%)

If there were 1 EV per household, how much increase would that be?
Assume 12K miles driven per year and a car that gets 4 miles per kwh, that would require an additional 3000 kwh...a 30% increase per household or a grand total of 6% increase in overall electricity production. Of course there will be some savings since gasoline refineries that use a lot counted in the industrial sector would decrease.
Even if you assume 15K miles per year and an less efficient 3 miles per kwh it is a 50% increase per household and thus a 10% overall increase.

Note that it will take at least a decade (probably more) to move to one EV per household IMHO. So this is just an increase of about 1% per year.
Install solar on your roof an you've offset more than your EV will consume.

There will also be some commercial vehicles such as UPS/Fedex that start switching to EV.
I'm not ignoring those...just harder to do a quick calculation. But look around...most traffic is private cars. And extra 1-2% per year, starting slowly is not hard to do.


Mike
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No. of Recommendations: 7
The problem with EVs is that the future isn't here yet. They don't work for everyone. Currently, they probably don't work for over half of the population. There are several hurdles still to overcome.

Sure, there are hurdles to overcome for the second 50% of the population.
But current adoption is maybe 2%.
Do you not even start to get the first 50% just because some people in the second 50% aren't on board with what is available today?

Let the enthusiasts and more well off pay to get the race started.


So, no. There are not three different standard besides Tesla. Just one. At least in the US.


False.
In the US we have:
- J1772 Every EV supports this
This is an SAE standard, faster than 110v but still slow. Most are 6 KW
Over 35,000 in US (count does not include home chargers or those installed at private work places

- Tesla Superchargers. 20K in US (3 versions all compatible, 72, 120/150 and 250 KW)
- Tesla destination chargers (same plug as fast Superchargers. Up to 22 kw, Usually free
There are 24K of these worldwide...US is probably 50-60% of this
- CHAdeMO (Japanese standard. At all Nissan dealers and other locations in US)
over 2600 in US, most are 62 KW. New version up to 400 KW
- CCS. Over 2400 in US. All the VW (dieselgate punishment) are of this type. Varying speeds up to 350 KW. Tesla's use this in Europe.


Mike
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How much gas/propane on a continuing basis would this generator need to be fed to power say, your average 2000-3000 sg ft home? If an outage were to last a week, what would the stores of gas or propane be needed?

The Building/Maintaining a Home board is a good place for such questions, and related subjects have come up recently. Some very sharp people hang out there.

I have no interest in the original question. I just pay my monthly utility bill. In time I might go solar, but not right now. The Tesla PowerWall makes this possible.

I once knew a guy who cobbled together some way to wire around his electric meter. He locked the gate to his back yard (to the electric meter). So the electric company shut off his power. So he bought a 1.5 KW motor-generator - enough to run his refrig.

Yeah, he was a nut job, but he was from Tennessee so what do you expect?

CNC
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Thereby draining your car's battery. Better hope you won't need to go anywhere.If you really want to power your home in an outage, you'd be better off with a generator. ex: 10,000-Watt Electric Start Portable Generator... $1,099 https://www.ebay.com/itm/202518309513

Rayvt an electric car can power your house for 4 days just on the battery. But the beauty of it is the solar panels will charge your battery back up the next day. The Tesla batter has 100 kwh and my power for the whole month was only 962 kwh.

Andy
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How much gas/propane on a continuing basis would this generator need to be fed to power say, your average 2000-3000 sg ft home? If an outage were to last a week, what would the stores of gas or propane be needed?
Pete,

Another question you need to find out is how much maintenance you will need to do to maintain it. You have to either have someone maintain it for you or every month you will need to do maintenance for the time that you may need it.

Andy
Who worked for a large Telephone company that had a crew that maintained their gas Generators.
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A question for those with some experience with both generators and outages (I only have the latter):

How much gas/propane on a continuing basis would this generator need to be fed to power say, your average 2000-3000 sg ft home? If an outage were to last a week, what would the stores of gas or propane be needed?


It depends completely on your power requirements.
Heating or furnace motor in the winter. We do not have natural gas here, it's all electric. We have a few 1500 W heaters and a couple of propane heaters that use the 1 lb Coleman cylinders. We also have 2-burner portable cooktops, both electric and propane.

Biggest thing is refrigerator(s) and freezer(s).
Serious preppers keep a half-dozen 5 gal gas containers, in rotation so that no gas is more that 2 years old. And a half-dozen or dozen 20lb propane tanks. Gasoline is a PITA because gas goes bad in a year or so. But gas has more energy than propane. But propane does not go bad in storage.

I always figure that in a prolonged outage, that gas stations would *somehow* find a way to pump gas for people. SO probably all you really need is enough gas & propane to get you over the initial outage.
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I have no interest in the original question. I just pay my monthly utility bill. In time I might go solar, but not right now. The Tesla PowerWall makes this possible.

This past winter was a wakeup moment for a lot of people. We hit -6 F for a week straight.
This is an area where the typical low temperature is right about freezing.
There are 2 electric companies in our area. One had to do rolling blackouts, the other (ours) managed to stay completely up but it was touch-and-go.

If we had lost power we'd have been in a world of hurt, since we are all electric in my community. Of course, when it is below zero in the garage you don't have to worry about the freezer in the garage. ;-)

It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. So now we have a mid-size dual-fuel generator and a few cans of gas & tanks of propane.....and will not consider it a waste if we never use it.

A PowerWall doesn't do you any good if you don't have it installed and working.
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First, J1772 and CCS1 are the same thing. The J1772 is the AC only part of the connector, while CCS1 includes the DC portion. It's the J1772 connector with DC added to it. I believe CCS1 needs the control pins from the J1772 portion to work correctly (and to orient the DC connector correctly.)

Nissan was the last holdout in the US on the CHAdeMO connector. They no longer use it on their newest EV, the Ariya. https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1128906_nissan-electric... OK. New Leafs still use it, but it will likely be switched to CCS1 the next time the Leaf gets a refresh.

Ditto in the EU:
https://chargedevs.com/newswire/the-war-is-over-nissan-to-sw... I'll note that the EU uses the CCS2 standard. Looks similar to CCS1, but the AC portion of the connector has 7 pins instead of 5, and is known as Mennenkes.

Of course, there are still plenty of CHAdeMO capable charging stations in the US because there are plenty of cars still on the road that can use this connector.

Going forward, there will only be two connectors on electric vehicles sold in the US. Tesla uses their proprietary connector. Everyone else uses J1772/CCS1.

--Peter
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Going forward, there will only be two connectors on electric vehicles sold in the US. Tesla uses their proprietary connector. Everyone else uses J1772/CCS1.


Agreed.
But CHAdeMO cars will be around for another decade or more.

That is on the car side.

But for the EVSE (charging station) side we will see Tesla, CCS, CHAdeMO and level 2 J1772...plus the even older RV charging outlets (usually NEMA 14-50). For these you have to bring your own adapter/cord that fits your car. Same thing for using 110v for emergency use.
My Toyota Prius plug in and Nissan Leaf came with these (110v to J1772). And my Model 3 came with a cord that goes from 110v or 240v with adaptor to the Tesla connector.

Mike
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Note that it will take at least a decade (probably more) to move to one EV per household IMHO. So this is just an increase of about 1% per year.

And it’s even less than it seems. Presumably most charging will be done at homes, in the garage, overnight. There is tons of capacity available at 3am; the problems we have appear at peak times: hot days in the afternoons.

So a healthy part of your “1% a year” will be trivial to handle; the utilities already do it now, they just do it at different times of the day.

There will also be some commercial vehicles such as UPS/Fedex that start switching to EV.
I'm not ignoring those...just harder to do a quick calculation.


Again, virtually all that charging will be done overnight.
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Tesla uses their proprietary connector. Everyone else uses J1772/CCS1

Yep. And you can buy an adapter on Amazon so that Tesla chargers can be used for non-Tesla vehicles. I haven't looked into it too far yet, but I assume Tesla allows their chargers to be used by non-Tesla vehicles (for a fee, of course). As an aside, that is a potentially good revenue stream for them.
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How many people can't afford more than $5k - $10k for a used car? How many people can't charge their car overnight because they have to park on the street or somewhere else where charging isn't readily available? How many people need to carry significant tools to work (no one actually has a truck available yet, although at least 3 are getting very close). And once a truck is available, how many can afford a new one?

I've got some great news for those people! EV sales as a percent total market share is tiny, and won't hit parity with ICE vehicles until 2030-ish, according to most estimates. And most manufacturers have plans to continue to build ICEs until 2035 and some longer than that. Plus, vehicle life is about 12 years. So if you want or need an ICE you'll be able to buy one for a few more decades.
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There is tons of capacity available at 3am; the problems we have appear at peak times: hot days in the afternoons.

Unless you're in Texas during an overnight blackout due to low temperatures.

AJ
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And you can buy an adapter on Amazon so that Tesla chargers can be used for non-Tesla vehicles. I haven't looked into it too far yet, but I assume Tesla allows their chargers to be used by non-Tesla vehicles (for a fee, of course). As an aside, that is a potentially good revenue stream for them.

Nope. Not in the US at least.
These adapters do allow a free charger with a Tesla plug to be used by anyone. For example a Tesla home charger or a Tesla Destination charger (like at a hotel or restaurant). At the Superchargers the charger communicates with the car and gets an ID, then checks to see if you have a valid credit car associated with your account the starts the charger.

This is another advantage to the Tesla Superchargers. You just drive up and plug in (unlike everyone else, the plug actually has a button on it that opens your charging port door). No messing with a credit card, RFID card or a phone app. I have a Chargepoint account (for free charging at work) but I have to tap an RFID card or my phone with the app running on the charging station and wait for it to authenticate before it unlocks the charging cord. Not really a big deal, unless it is not in a parking garage and it is raining, for example.

Mike
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A quick google shows a lot of options.

https://www.amazon.com/Tesla-Charging-Adapter/s?k=Tesla+Char...

I think this is the one needed:

https://ev-lectron.com/products/lectron-tesla-to-j1772-adapt...

$150.

Yes, I use EA (for VW), and the phone app is a bit annoying. It already knows me when I plug the car in (it displays my name), so why not just start? Why have a phone app at all?

I also opened a ChargePoint acct, but haven't tried to use it yet. I should probably get a physical card and keep it in the vehicle. I only have the app.

Since I don't have an adapter, I haven't investigated Tesla chargers at all.
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I was wondering if Tesla is missing some cash flow by not letting non-Teslas to charge - for a "nominal" (heh, heh) fee. But it would likely inconvenience some Tesla owners if they had to wait for a VW to charge before the Teslas.

CNC
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CountNoCount writes,

I was wondering if Tesla is missing some cash flow by not letting non-Teslas to charge - for a "nominal" (heh, heh) fee. But it would likely inconvenience some Tesla owners if they had to wait for a VW to charge before the Teslas.

</snip>


I waiting for "congestion pricing". Imagine what you could charge in SF or Seattle after an earthquake when thousands of people are trying to leave town and they're queued up at the Supercharger. <LOL>

intercst
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<<Unless you're in Texas during an overnight blackout due to low temperatures.>>

Or in California this week with EV owners being urged to not charge up
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Actually, what Tesla is doing in CA for the 4th of July weekend is providing free charging at some (projected to be congested) Superchargers during non-peak times to reduce demand during the peak.

Mike
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A quick google shows a lot of options.

https://www.amazon.com/Tesla-Charging-Adapter/s?k=Tesla+Char......

I think this is the one needed:

https://ev-lectron.com/products/lectron-tesla-to-j1772-adapt......

$150.


Sure, but it still won't allow you to charge unless it is at free (low speed) charger.
Just read the specs and comments in your 2nd link. It works for Tesla L2 chargers and destination chargers -- but not all of them.
This is perfect if you have a Tesla and another EV. You can get a Tesla charger in your garage and use the adapter for your non-Tesla.
I have the opposite -- I have a L2 charger that works on every EV and plugin hybrid and I use the much smaller Tesla-provided adapter (4" long) shown in your first link. With this you can charge a Tesla from any of the L2 chargers that everyone can use.

Mike



Mike
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