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The Girl Who Drank the moon is possibly/probably my favorite book of all time so far. I love that book, and when I was volunteering at my old school, I shared it with the sixth graders that I was tutoring. They loved it too.

John David Anderson is becoming one of my favorite MG/YA authors. Several people have mentioned Mrs. Bixby. I need to read it

I'll add the other two to my TBR list. I've only read one book by Malinda Lo and it was good.
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And a bunch of EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) books (non-zombies). Naming a few:

You lost me here. I googled it and I'm still not sure. This is a... genre?

David Copperfield is one of my favorite books of allll time and I will be re-reading it soon. I think it's Dickens' best. Most think his best is Great Expectations but, well, they are wrong.
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There's only one I grok, from many years ago in high school I think.

Ken
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Educated is an incredible book. It's not fiction, though. It really happened.

culcha
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Here are my favorite reads from this summer.

- The Galaxy and the Ground Within by Becky Chambers is the final book in her Wayfarers series.
- Phoenix and Ashes by Mercedes Lackey is a retelling of Cinderella set in England during the depths of World War 1. It is book three of her Elemental Masters series but the books are written as standalones so reading the previous two in the series is unnecessary.
- Maybe He Just Likes You by Barbara Dee deals with sexual harassment in middle school.
- The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl by Stacy McAnulty is Lucy's adventure into dealing with the ungifted and people IRL.
- Stowaway by John David Anderson is not for you if stowing away on a spaceship full of pirates doesn't interest you.

I reread Madeline L'Engle's classic A Wrinkle in Time on Monday. I had forgotten how great that book is.
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PucksFool... based on your summer favorites, I'll offer these recommendations back at ya':

Too Bright to See by Kyle Lukoff is about Bug, a little girl who is about to start Middle School after the death of her uncle. While her friend Mo is making new friends and thinking about boys, make-up, and clothes, none of those things interest Bug. She's different but doesn't quite understand why she's different... yet. And there are 'ghosts'. Beautifully written. A 2021 National Book Award nominee.

The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill is about the annual sacrifice of babies by the people of Protectorate and a witch named Xan who secretly saves the babies and gives them to families on the other side of the Forest. Along the journey, Xan feeds the babies with starlight. One year, after Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight instead of starlight, funny things start to happen. Winner of the 2017 Newbery Medal.

Ms. Bixby's Last Day by John David Anderson is a laugh-out-loud sad adventure of sorts about life and relationships, determination and inevitability.

Malinda Lo’s Last Night at the Telegraph Club is a queer romance -- a quite beautiful, sensitive love story -- that begins at a lesbian bar called the Telegraph Club. Set in 1954, one of the book's back-drops is the Red-Scare. A remarkably well-written book filled with plenty of historic detail. Also a 2021 National Book Award nominee.
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The Girl Who Drank the moon is possibly/probably my favorite book of all time so far. I love that book, and when I was volunteering at my old school, I shared it with the sixth graders that I was tutoring. They loved it too.

John David Anderson is becoming one of my favorite MG/YA authors. Several people have mentioned Mrs. Bixby. I need to read it

I'll add the other two to my TBR list. I've only read one book by Malinda Lo and it was good.
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A few more suggestions. Since you mentioned Becky Chambers, I'll assume you've read/will read "A Psalm for the Wild-Built". Others that may be of interest: "She Who Became the Sun" by Shelley Parker-Chan, Sarah Gailey's "The Echo Wife", "A Memory Called Empire" by Arkady Martine, and one for Middle Schoolers, especially those who prefer contemporary adventure novels (rather than SciFi/Fantasy), "The Canyon's Edge" by Dusti Bowling. My daughter also liked "Project Hail Mary," Andy Weir's new novel, but I haven't read it yet.
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Hi,

I agree with you, David Copperfield is the best!

So EMP books fall under Science fiction, Thriller, Apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction. I find them on Amazon since my library only carries William R. Forschten book/audio.

An EMP destroys all non-shielded electronic devices (cell phones, refrigerators, generators, inverters, TVs, radios, cars, etc) and throws you back into the 1800s (shuts down power) and you have to survive by using your skills, mind, and instincts to stay alive. No food, clean drinking water, medicine, etc. and good people are forced to make choices they would otherwise never do in order to protect their family and survive. The world becomes a dangerous place when society falls into dismay.

The first series I read was the Irish End Game (12 books). From Amazon - "The first three books in the Irish End Game series take an average American family and puts them in the middle of a post-apocalyptic melt-down in a rural setting in Ireland. Free Falling shows the family "when the bomb drops" and how they're able to learn what they need to do to survive."


I prefer the non-zombie EMP books. James Hunt is another author I like. Hope this answers your question.
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Becky Chambers has an imagination that means I am never sure where her books are going until they get there. I hope she spends more time with the Earth of "A Psalm for the Wild-Built." I have liked everything by Sarah Gailey that I've read. "Magic for Liars" is probably my favorite. It is as if Raymond Chandler or Dashel Hammett wrote a murder mystery set in a school for magic. Don't think Hogwarts; think exclusive prep school. I have Andy Weir's book in my stack of TBR books but just haven't gotten around to it yet. All your other suggestions are going on to my TBR list. Thanks.
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I listened Ms. Bixby's Last Day today. At the end of the book, I was ugly crying on my walk in the woods. I wish I could share it with students. It would make a great book to share with pre-service teachers.
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