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No. of Recommendations: 49
User: I'm getting a message saying my mailbox is full!!!!!

imp: Delete some chit.

User: I can't! I need all of it!!!! Make the quota bigger!

imp: No. Mailbox limits, and who is in each mailbox store, is set by <executive>. You would have to talk him into that, not me.

User: You can't do it temporarily?! I need this right now - I could be missing customer emails!!!

imp: The emails will hold in queue until you delete stuff, then be delivered to your mailbox.

User: I can't delete anything, everything in there is business critical!

imp: <tired of this guy, logs into account via web interface> I'm pretty sure you can delete all the political forwards to X, Y and Z; as well as the what appears to be a video clip titled "BE CAREFUL WHEN YOU OPEN THIS" to the guys in your region. That should clear some room.

User: <silence>

imp: Have a great day!

impolite
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<tired of this guy, logs into account via web interface> I'm pretty sure you can delete all the political forwards to X, Y and Z; as well as the what appears to be a video clip titled "BE CAREFUL WHEN YOU OPEN THIS" to the guys in your region. That should clear some room.

Wow, there are still people who send crap like this through their work email account? I would have thought with the crappy economy folks would be a bit more cautious about their work email accounts...

StB. (zealous about the difference between personal & work email accounts)
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Wow, there are still people who send crap like this through their work email account? I would have thought with the crappy economy folks would be a bit more cautious about their work email accounts...

Since there is no real-time monitoring, they think they "got away with it" and continue to do some very naughty things.

Those that have been fired for misuse were shocked - SHOCKED - to find that we can go back for a very, very long time and pull records.

We usually pull on demand - so a manager comes to us and asks, and we then pull and provide.

impolite
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We have private and public mailboxes. Public stuff is supposed to be all work related, private for personal stuff. But I have a huge pricate box because I get all these emails with giant attachments, and they fill up the public box, so I stuff them all in the private box.

I generally download and save all the files, but I like to keep the originals as backup.

Nancy
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User: I can't delete anything, everything in there is business critical!

My company had - until last year - unlimited email storage (ok, virtually unlimited email storage). After a few legal mishaps and subpoenas it was decided that the corporation would have a 90 day retention period.

One of my coworkers hadn't deleted any of their emails for the last 6-7 YEARS. He would sort his mailbox whenever looking for his archived emails and at the time was up to roughly 22,000+ items in his mailbox. It was quite fascinating as the sort might take up to a minute to complete. Apparently, this practice wasn't uncommon among some of my fellow coworkers. So, when the notice came out that emails would automatically be purged after 90 days - along with any PSD files on the network.... well, you could hear genitalia hitting the floor. Over the next two months there was an abundance of whining, complaining, threatening, hysterics, and actual tears - but the legal team in our company won the battle. Emails were purged - it took the better part of two weeks for the initial purge process to complete. The process continues to run daily and kills anything on the our internal network after it crosses the 90 day mark.

Amazingly, no one actually died because of this decision. though I'm sure the Company Crisis Hotline did some booming business in the aftermath......

cliff
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My company had - until last year - unlimited email storage (ok, virtually unlimited email storage). After a few legal mishaps and subpoenas it was decided that the corporation would have a 90 day retention period.

Best day of my life when I was working for a huge company was when I was deemed to be someone working in an area that was the subject of a lawsuit. The company had to put in a system to permanently retail ALL our email indefinitely (for discovery).

Previous to that, we had a 30MB limit, this was in say...2006? I once emailed to complain and demand an increase, they told me they could increase it to the max allowed to executives and senior manager if I had sufficient justification. I gave a convincing argument and they bumped me up to.....40MB!

It's always amazed me how low the limits at every place I've worked have been. The best I've had is 100. When I had 30 I though ok...times 15000 employees that's a lot? Well it was really less than 500GB total. And I don't care how many times you mirror, stripe, copy, backup to tape, etc....that isn't very much. I mean come on. Maybe imp can fill me in here. Is this the architecture of Exchange? Is it just really low IT budgets? Executives that don't read their own email and don't realize we're past the 90s? How can I get my own personal 500GB of backed up space on a network server for files but still have so little space for email?
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Maybe imp can fill me in here. Is this the architecture of Exchange? Is it just really low IT budgets?

One word: Backups.

The more email storage, the longer the backup. I'm not talking one hour bumping to two - I'm talking it not finishing before the next business day starts which means the loss of the server would also mean loss of previous day's emails.

Our lowest is 500MB, highest (execs, of course) 1Gig. We've taught them how to archive, we'd explained what all counts towards the limit (calendar, deleted, sent, etc) but what it really comes down to is 500MB times 400 people divided by three (3) IT people trying to keep stuff running.

So. You know. Backups.

impolite
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How can I get my own personal 500GB of backed up space on a network server for files but still have so little space for email?

I don't know if it's still true, but Outlook used to have trouble with large (>1G?) files.

On the other hand, if you've got access to 500GB of network space - could you build a personal PST file? You could archive your stuff there.

My company standard email receives to a PST on my laptop, so the corporate max on the mail server is never touched, unless I'm on an extended vacation. I then have an 'archive' PST on network space where I move things after some period, using archive rules (for instance, my sent folder moves after 30 days). I create a new archive folder each year, and generally purge those after 3 years.
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Our lowest is 500MB, highest (execs, of course) 1Gig.

Well, that's 5-10x more than I've had anywhere. So sounds good to me.
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I don't know if it's still true, but Outlook used to have trouble with large (>1G?) files.

Yes, this is still true. Over a Gig and you start getting the "want to start Outlook is safe mode?" question, and after 2 Gig you can bet you'll have to repair the ost over and over and over again.

We encourage .psts, archive or personal, but struggle with getting people to understand they are also subject to the "Gig or less" rule. We try to have people sort them by year (so one year per .pst), or customer, or whatever bucket works best for them, so that they don't exceed a certain size, but....<shrug> we are outnumbered 10:1.

The .psts are searchable, so they are a decent solution to most local storage problems.

impolite
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We encourage .psts, archive or personal, but struggle with getting people to understand they are also subject to the "Gig or less" rule. We try to have people sort them by year (so one year per .pst), or customer, or whatever bucket works best for them, so that they don't exceed a certain size, but....<shrug> we are outnumbered 10:1.

I use annual .psts, and it works out pretty well. I knew there had to be an address limit problem somewhere, but didn't have a hard guideline till I saw the one Gig on this thread. (runs off to check) Oops. My 2010 .pst is 1.2 Gig, and 2011 is about a Gig now. The size went up with the conversion to Outlook 2007; the same messages stored more space efficiently in Outlook 2003.

I may have to look at deleting more messages. The downside to that is, it takes time to identify what's safe to delete. There have been high profile instances of tough questions being answered easily by finding a 3 year old email.

The war story here: At one point, the edict came down from On High that not only was email going to be purged after 90 days, but that we would not be allowed to maintain .pst files. I guess some executroid wanted to avoid potential future discovery. Fortunately, Legal managed to get that idiocy rescinded before I lost my history. I don't care if you have to manage the servers efficiently, just let me keep my history locally.

Patzer
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may have to look at deleting more messages. The downside to that is, it takes time to identify what's safe to delete. There have been high profile instances of tough questions being answered easily by finding a 3 year old email.

The war story here: At one point, the edict came down from On High that not only was email going to be purged after 90 days, but that we would not be allowed to maintain .pst files. I guess some executroid wanted to avoid potential future discovery. Fortunately, Legal managed to get that idiocy rescinded before I lost my history. I don't care if you have to manage the servers efficiently, just let me keep my history locally.



Ha! The battle we've been fighting since we came to this cockamamie law firm in 2008! All emails are purged after 60 days. One of my partners keeps an external hard drive so he can back things up but he's not that diligent about doing so.

I keep waiting for one of those high profile cases to hit us, but there have been a couplafew instances where emails had to be produced and somehow they were, so I think IT is lying to us when they tell us they can't recover them once they're purged.

MOI
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How can I get my own personal 500GB of backed up space on a network server for files but still have so little space for email?

If you have 500 GB of space for personal stuff, why don't you back up your email there? That's how my company works--I make a personal folder in my email, and it's stored on my hard drive, so it doesn't get erased in the 90-day email purge, but I can still access it through Outlook, etc.



--Booa (finds it hard to believe her company is on the bleeding edge, email storage-wise)
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I may have to look at deleting more messages. The downside to that is, it takes time to identify what's safe to delete. There have been high profile instances of tough questions being answered easily by finding a 3 year old email.

PSTs are odd files. Make SURE that if you do delete things from PSTs, that you run a Compact on them afterwards.

(on the main menu bar, go to Tools, Account Settings. Choose the Data Files tab, choose the PST in question, and hit the Settings button. Choose "Compact Now" but depending on the size of the file, be prepared for it to go a few hours... I usually do mine overnight at home because I have a laptop. If you're on a desktop, do it before you leave for the night.)

Basically, it's the same process as a defrag for your hard drive. When you delete e-mails from a PST, it leaves holes in the PST but doesn't reorganize or reindex to clean them up. ONLY by running a Compact Now does the space come back in any significant way.

I've had people with 1GB or larger PSTs delete or move half the e-mail in them, and only get back about 10% of the space instead of 50% - and then they run a Compact Now and are shocked (SHOCKED, I tell you!) at how much space they get back.

Sometimes a Compact Now is a good idea anyway, just like a Defrag is. But there's no analyzer for the PST like there is for a hard drive. Especially with larger file sizes, it can sometimes save you from corruption of the file down the line, which is NO fun at all.

GSF

PSA: please, for the love of dog, stop attaching 2MB+ files to MEETING REQUESTS. No one can find them afterwards, and people clean out their ENTIRE inbox and ENTIRE sent mail and are still amazed that they're out of space... because their boss CONSTATNLY sends giant decks in meeting requests. Stopitstopistopitstopitstopit.


GSF
...Microsoft Mail/Outlook support/informal resource since 1902... or maybe earlier...
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