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Easter was originally the celebration of Ishtar, the Assyrian and Babylonian Goddess of Fertility and Sex. Her symbols (like the egg and the bunny) were, and still are, fertility and sex symbols (or did you actually think eggs and bunnies had anything to do with the resurrection?)

After Constantine decided to Christianize the Empire, Easter was changed to represent Jesus, but at its roots, Easter (which is how you pronounce Ishtar) is all about celebrating fertility and sex.

Have a most enjoyable weekend.
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Thank you, Goofy.

May I reprint that for my knowledge starved frineds?
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Have a most enjoyable weekend.

Can you please not say that until it's close to the weekend?

6, excited for a second there
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May I reprint that for my knowledge starved frineds?

Sure. It's not mine, I copped it from a friend's Facebook post, but I looked it up before posting - and found many confirming sources. Oddly, the fundamentalist sites (which come up in any Googlishness of Easter) did not mention the connection.

Can't figure that out.
 
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And so the "War on Easter" continues...

http://www.outsidethecamp.org/dyk14.htm

"The Old Testament mentions a pagan goddess from which the festival of Easter is derived. This goddess was the goddess of fertility and sexual lust..."
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*sigh*

Eggs and bunnies have nothing to do with Ishtar.

They are the symbols of Ostara or Eostre, a Germanic goddess, from whom these traditions come. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%92ostre

I guess some people think it sounds better to attribute the rituals to a Middle Eastern goddess instead of to a Germanic one. Not sure why, since most of our Christmas/Yule traditions are Germanic.

Ishtar/Astarte/Innanna (all the same goddess, different times/cultures) has symbols of a dragon, lion, and 7- or 8-pointed star (depending).

If you look at the Gate of Ishtar from Babylon, there's no bunnies or eggs. There are dragons and lions. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e3/Ishtar_Ga...

Now, she IS a fertility goddess, representing both sex and death, love and war. I did a write up about her here: http://www.lifeuncalculated.com/p/about-ishtar.html

(scroll down to "why Ishtar?"

Ishtar
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*sigh*

Eggs and bunnies have nothing to do with Ishtar.


Wiki pins the gig, eggs bunnies and all on Germanic pagans;

Eostre or Ostara (Northumbrian Old English: Eostre; West Saxon Old English: Eastre; Old High German: *Ôstara) is a goddess in Germanic paganism who, by way of the Germanic month bearing her name (Northumbrian: Eosturmonaþ; West Saxon: Eastermonaþ; Old High German: Ôstarmânoth), is the namesake of the festival of Easter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eostre

no mention of ishtara ;-(

NTTAWWT
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I did link to that, too. :)

Ishtar is Middle Eastern. Bunnies and eggs don't show up a whole lot in the Middle East. :P

Ishtar
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Ishtar is Middle Eastern. Bunnies and eggs don't show up a whole lot in the Middle East. :P

Ishtar


What would you know about it?
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Eggs and bunnies are the symbols of Ostara or Eostre, a Germanic fertility goddess, representing both sex and death, love and war

I can confirm from firsthand sightings that the bunnies are now out and hopping about in Germany. And are conducting their own fertility rites.
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What would you know about it?

Obviously, nothing. :P

Ishtar
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Ishtar was the goddess of love, fertility, war and sex. However, her symbols were the lion, the gate and the eight-pointed star.

Easter is an English word. The Greeks and Romans called it Pascha, which is why Easter is Pasqua in Italian, Pascua in Spanish, and Paques in French. How exactly did the name of a Canaanite fertility goddess skip all the way to England from the Middle East without stopping in Rome or Byzantium?

These days she, Ishtar, is particularly associated with sacred prostitution (also known as temple prostitution), which, in the religions of the Ancient Near East, took on the form of every woman having to, at some point in her life, go to the temple of Ishtar and have sex with the first stranger who offered her money. Once a woman entered the temple of Ishtar for the purpose of sacred prostitution, she was not allowed to leave until she’d done the deed.
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These days she, Ishtar, is particularly associated with sacred prostitution (also known as temple prostitution), which, in the religions of the Ancient Near East, took on the form of every woman having to, at some point in her life, go to the temple of Ishtar and have sex with the first stranger who offered her money. Once a woman entered the temple of Ishtar for the purpose of sacred prostitution, she was not allowed to leave until she’d done the deed.

While her priestesses were sacred prostitutes, I've never heard of this other assertion.

May I ask your source?

Ishtar
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Ok, I see where you got it, from Herodotus (Greek).


Modern scholars dispute his story.

On Herodotus's "wholly shameful" Babylonian custom, Tikva Frymer-Kensky comments: "No cuneiform text supports the idea that the women of Assyria or Babylon did this." She adds that Herodotus wanted to demonstrate "the superiority of Greeks" and, possibly, "to show the horrible results that could follow if proper women were not kept as guarded and secluded as they were in Greece"(Frymer-Kensky 1992:200). Significantly, late commentaries such as that of Herodotus are the "most explicit texts describing sacred prostitution in Mesopotamia" (Yamauchi 1973:216).

http://www.matrifocus.com/SAM05/spotlight.htm
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