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More than a THIRD of Millennials in America live with their parents – and New Jersey has the most with 47% living at home

Nationwide, 35 percent of people age 18-35 still live with their parents, but the proportion varies widely from one state to the next, according to a new analysis
Nearly half (47 percent) of Millennials in New Jersey still live with their parents
At 16 percent, North Dakota had the lowest incidence of adults living at home

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6443285/How-Millenn...

the generation that 'failed to launch'......

No wonder they vote for Bernie.....

t.
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More than a THIRD of Millennials in America live with their parents...

Nationwide, 35 percent of people age 18-35 still live with their parents


They live with the parents who:
-Threw a tantrum when *everyone* didn't get an MVP trophy,
-Drove them everywhere and always set up play dates for them, and didn't let them wander around in an unprogrammed manner and see what there was to see,
-Encouraged them to follow their dreams, whether those dreams were to get a STEM degree from a state college or a Dance History degree from an exclusive private college because the little darlings deserve the full college experience,
-Didn't deter them from taking out bombastic amounts of loans to do so
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<<-Threw a tantrum when *everyone* didn't get an MVP trophy,
-Drove them everywhere and always set up play dates for them, and didn't let them wander around in an unprogrammed manner and see what there was to see,
-Encouraged them to follow their dreams, whether those dreams were to get a STEM degree from a state college or a Dance History degree from an exclusive private college because the little darlings deserve the full college experience,
-Didn't deter them from taking out bombastic amounts of loans to do so>>



I'm guessing further that in high school, they avoided taking trade school type classes such as typing, bookkeeping, wood, metal working and machine shop classes, hom ec (cooking) and such.

Rather than acquiring practical skills as part of their "education," they took primarily academic classes that don't offer an entry level employee much by themselves.

Do most high schools even have shop classes these days?


Seattle Pioneer
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Rather than acquiring practical skills as part of their "education," they took primarily academic classes that don't offer an entry level employee much by themselves.

Do most high schools even have shop classes these days?



I tried to put a robotics program into our local high school. Our school board will even pay the teachers that work with the activity, and they get a bonus if it is a STEM activity. I told them, " I sit on the board. I can give you a fully funded robotics team. I can give you coaches, I can give you mentors. Here's a check for $7000 to get you started."

Their response? "No thanks, it looks like too much work."

Kathleen
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SP:"Do most high schools even have shop classes these days?"

Nope. But they do have computer classes...... depending upon the school....sometimes many computer type courses/gaming/video....... and maybe some video production/editing.....

Home Ec? What would it teach? Where to get your chinese takeout? How to count calories and which diet plan is best? How to warm up left over pizza that was delivered? <g>

Auto mechanics.....half computers.........diagnosing your car systems. Cars - up to 40 different computers distributed throughout.....

I took a robotics course taught as 'adult ed' in Arlington VA back in the 1980s......and students could take it too. A few did...was on Saturdays....... like 20 week course...fun....
Then I started on my MSEE degree at GWU.... no time for fun classes...busy working and taking classes...which I enjoyed....but busted my butt on most of them with the work....

t.
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<<I took a robotics course taught as 'adult ed' in Arlington VA back in the 1980s......and students could take it too. A few did...was on Saturdays....... like 20 week course...fun....>>


Sio what did you think of the class, instructor(s) and fellow students?


How did you fit in as an MSEE?


Much of the robotics stuff I see these days is based on the Arduino or Raspberry Pi, both great platforms for such experimentation, it seems to me.


Seattle Pioneer
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re- robotics: SP:"Sio what did you think of the class, instructor(s) and fellow students?"

Instructor good. DOn't recall all that many details now...lots of water over the dam since the 1983 type era

That was before I got involved in the MSEE program.

-- ----
SP:"How did you fit in as an MSEE?"

Good......the majority of students were busy working in industry. I took two classes 'on campus' downtown DC. Those were mostly youngsters - some of whom were in a 5 year BS/MSEE program, others just entering grad school.

Most of my classes were taught 'off campus' at E-Systems which was located on the beltway. THey had six classrooms set up just for that, and many of the students were E-System and the rest were from the hundred other companies around the beltway. Fit in just fine - I was 40 at the time,not having been in college for 20 years.

GWU had an interesting way of 'accepting' grad school students. Most places around the country back then you had to have a 3.0 out of 4.0 GPA to gain entrance. I did not fit in that category. At my college, less than 10% of students got an A in a course. 10-15% flunked a course. More than half the students got a "C" which was a good passing grade. About 25% of students got a B. So needless to say, being at a brainy school, I graduated in the 'middle' of my class and the class median was 2.3.

GWU required you take two courses. Your previous GPA not really relavant. One was Stochastic Processes and Systems.....the other was a technical elective in your field and I took Switching Systems (telephone) and Technology. The first was a hairy math course - but I passed it fine. THe other I ace'd. So I was in. Rest of courses were all technical for the MSEE.

Now, getting OUT of GWU was not easy. At other colleges, once you got in, you were guaranteed to get out if you passed all the required courses. Not so at GWU!

To get out, you had an EIGHT HOUR comprehensive exam, closed book. You had to do four questions from the 'required courses'( like 4 out of 7 questions) and four questions out of 8 in your elective. Obviously, those questions were multi-part and took 30-40 minutes to calculate and write the answers for all the subparts and interconnected stuff.

Depending upon your major, the flunk rate was high. For Communications, the flunk rate was over half. (that's the theoretical stuff). For Comp sci/telecom - my area - it was about 30%. You could take the exam twice.

Needless to say, if you flunked, they'd recommend 'remedial courses' or taking the same course(S) again - and you had to wait six months since they only gave the exams every six months. So......after you finished your classes, you'd spend 3 months 'reviewing' and relearning what you had forgot.

Tele passed the first time. Whew! Others try twice and , it's sorry - we liked your $12,000 or so in tuition, but no degree!.......

- -----


SP:"Much of the robotics stuff I see these days is based on the Arduino or Raspberry Pi, both great platforms for such experimentation, it seems to me."

Yes...kids start off early with computer simulation games.....play robots and transformers as 5 year old kids......

I had a Heathkit Hero Robot along the way somewhere.....back in the 1970s..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GQfJAm8tFc

Didn't have the arm, though.......


t.
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<<Now, getting OUT of GWU was not easy. At other colleges, once you got in, you were guaranteed to get out if you passed all the required courses. Not so at GWU!

To get out, you had an EIGHT HOUR comprehensive exam, closed book. You had to do four questions from the 'required courses'( like 4 out of 7 questions) and four questions out of 8 in your elective. Obviously, those questions were multi-part and took 30-40 minutes to calculate and write the answers for all the subparts and interconnected stuff. >>



I fondly remember a EE major who was in the University of Washington Radio Club with me.


He stoutly defended the idea that all students should take classes outside their majors to "broaden" them. He suggested that broadening include a year of regular college calculus as a requirement for all students to graduate!


Seattle Pioneer
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"He stoutly defended the idea that all students should take classes outside their majors to "broaden" them. He suggested that broadening include a year of regular college calculus as a requirement for all students to graduate!"

Well, for non-engineering majors, they should have to take a course in statistics and probability.......not so much sure about calculus

At RPI, we had to take 3 YEARS of math courses, starting with Calc I and II freshman year. Followed by Differential Equations..........Themodynamics was all math. Engineering Economics......

We had to take 2 semesters of Advanced Calc and Complex Variables (hairy stuff).....which I squeaked through......barely.

Only year I wasn't up to my eyeballs in math and hairy equations was the last year.....and that was all 'electives' other than a humanities course each semester to 'broaden us'......courses like anthropology, psychology, etc.

- ---

My sister was a math major......... took the whole 2 courses SLU had at the time, wound up getting snapped up by IBM....... never used her 'math' ........did programming......this back in the 1970s days.....

t.
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Yes...kids start off early with computer simulation games.....play robots and transformers as 5 year old kids......


Actually, one of the big ones for kids in robotics is the Lego Mindstorm kits. I've done a lot of work with their Education dept:

https://www.lego.com/en-us/mindstorms

The Mindstorms are a fast, easy way for kids to build a fully autonomous robot. They are cool.

Kathleen
love my robots
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Hard to blame them as there really aren't any other options for most.

I always have a chuckle at the lack of self awareness when boomers sneer at the younger generation as being lazy or incompetent or coddled.

They are living with the long-term economic consequences of YOUR collective choices over the past 50 years.

Luckily the boomers are dying off in increasing numbers.

Time to repair the damage.
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beaker::"I always have a chuckle at the lack of self awareness when boomers sneer at the younger generation as being lazy or incompetent or coddled."

We don't sneer....we just observe.....need for safe spaces.....their 'micro aggressions'.....their growing up with a 'everyone wins a trophy' attitude.......their being 'offended' by just about everything...... then hitting the 'real world'.

- -----

beaker::"They are living with the long-term economic consequences of YOUR collective choices over the past 50 years."

No, certainly not MINE. It is the collective result of 40 years of liberalism and socialism and the creation of the welfare state. Of central government run education from school lunches to liberal indoctrination in all subjects. It is having 'social media' as their news source, having the Commie News Network and other 'media' that went from actual reporting to being a shill for the democrat narrative. It is 40 years of creeping 'progressivism'.

- - ----

beaker:"Luckily the boomers are dying off in increasing numbers."

Not quite yet. The early boomers just hit the 70 bracket and most will live, according to stats to 87 or so.

It is the 'greatest generation' that is fading away fast. The ones who fought in WW2 and those in the Korean war, some who were older and were in the Vietnam War.

The peak of boomers ( born 1950-58) will be living well into the 2040 era ....and nearly ALL of them vote.

t.
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The tone of your reply indicates that provable facts are probably not something you are interested in so i will keep this short.

If you think the United States, in 2018, is some sort of a socialist welfare state, you are objectively out of your mind.

The USA has the highest income inequality of any developed nation by far. It is a mathematical fact. The USA has become a plutocracy.
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beaker:"If you think the United States, in 2018, is some sort of a socialist welfare state, you are objectively out of your mind."

When half the people in this country are receiving 'benefits' from the government, it sure is. It's massive redistribution from the middle and upper middle class to the lower class and retirees.

When 63% of 'immigrants' are on benefits for at least 10 years, and we're talking big time benefits of food stamps, housing allowances, health insurance, etc, adding up to over $20,000 per family per year, it sure is.....

-- ------

beaker:"The USA has the highest income inequality of any developed nation by far. It is a mathematical fact. "

Yep, Germany didn't invent the microprocessor, come up with computer operating systems, invent the iPhone, hold most of the patents in cellular radio, have their own silicon valley, or a million other inventions that made their inventors wealthy. Neither did the French or British or Italians.

The 'fact' that the top earners in this country propel the world's technology is the reason why we have skewed 'income numbers'. Plus, of course, democrats keeping certain minorities depressed due to their policies. Look no further than the top democrat cesspool cities like Chicago, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Detroit, etc......where 70 years of Democrat rule have insured horrible living conditions, low income, poor housing, high gang activity.

Socialism in most countries ensures that no one is rich, and everyone is headed to being 'equally poor'. Just look at France. the folks are rioting there because the government takes well over half their paychecks, then taxes them again 21% on Value Added TAx on anything they buy with what money they actually get in their paycheck. Highest tax burden in all of Europe.

the US is headed that way with Bernie, the dimwit from NY, and others demanding tax payers be gouged even more for 'free' college, 'free' medical, 'free' this, 'free' that......

Yeah, we can be just like Europe......where there are very few start ups that rock the world with great new innovations, where they watch the US and China land on the moon and MARS, where they pay $6 and $8 or more for a gallon of gas......


t.
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I rest my case.
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<Luckily the boomers are dying off in increasing numbers.>


Nice first post to a new board.

Not worth reading any more. Ploink.



BG
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