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From Your Money or Your Life coauthor Vicki Robin

http://bottomlinesecrets.com/blpnet/article.html?article_id=27364

intercst
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<<4. Don't throw out anything if it is still usable. That means even if it's useful for a purpose other than what it was originally intended for.

>>



Generally, I found the suggestions for frugal living to be good but I didn't find anything new for my purposes. I disagree with #4 above, though. My theory these days is to work fairly diligently to de junk my life. When I find things that I don't expect to use is the reasonably near term and that don't have sentimental value, my aim is to try to summon up the will to throw them out.

I tend to be a junk collector, and this can impair your life. If something's useable and has value, I'll donate it to a thrift shop. If not, I'll dump it. One of the luxuries in life I'm glad to be able to afford is the ability to throw junk out, rather than spending time selling it.


Anyone else out there struggling with getting rid of accumulated junk?




Seattle Pioneer
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Anyone else out there struggling with getting rid of accumulated junk?

This is a BIG problem around my household. I am a recovering junkaholic but as they say at JA (junkaholics anonymous) one day at a time.

I have adopted an ironclad rule to try to control it: one in one out. Before I buy something, I have to find something else (of equivalent size) to throw out. This appeals to my science background, conservation of mass and all that. I am still working on gaining on the total of stuff that I already have.

ayduda
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Anyone else out there struggling with getting rid of accumulated junk?

Uh, yes. A lot. Constantly.

If something's useable and has value, I'll donate it to a thrift shop. If not, I'll dump it. One of the luxuries in life I'm glad to be able to afford is the ability to throw junk out, rather than spending time selling it.

I live on a busy road . Most of the time that's a pain, but not when I have a large piece of "good" junk, like a chair or a rug, or a broken sled, or .... We have a large hedge, so people can stop, pick up the stuff, and never have to see the house or us. Works great.

I've had 1 garage sale - never again. The Salvation Army is a mile from my house, and get a lot of my business.

It is a constant battle, but I believe that in order to enjoy a less stressed retirement, an uncluttered household is a must. I'm not there yet, but I will be.

arrete - now if I could just get the kids to move out all their stuff...
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Anyone else out there struggling with getting rid of accumulated junk?

I still struggle with it, but I'm making progress. I think your approach is correct. I'm a big believer in Thoreau's line "Simplify, simplify, simplify". The less junk I have in my life, the less time I have to spend focusing on it.

Tutone
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I am afraid that these rules for living just don't fit me very well. If I were to live like this, it would feel like a death sentence. In fact, I would return to the workforce to avoid having to do many of these things.

For instance, there is nothing I like less than yard work and home repairs, and I really enjoy hiring someone to do it for me.

So I don't see how people can separate their money and their life. To me, money is so entangled with life, that I see it as simply enabling you to live the life you want to.

It strikes me that people who can live for next to nothing must have a completely different personality than I do.

Russ
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Anyone else out there struggling with getting rid of accumulated junk?

My wife is particularly attached to two moving boxes filled with Christmas lights. We have never put them up and never will, but we have moved them around for years. I think she wants to be buried with them.


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"Anyone else out there struggling with getting rid of accumulated junk?"



Not anymore. I got rid of so much stuff when I quit my regular job in 98. I sold on ebay, had a garage sale and took clothing to consignment shops. Now, I still find at least a bag a month to donate, sometimes more. I filled the back of my van last month with old toys, clothing and misc. house stuff. What I can't figure out is where it all comes from since I don't really shop and purchase items except groceries. I think I am still finding "old" things to donate. Just amazes me how much I find.

L




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Almost forgot to mention my motto..."Use it or lose it unless I (or someone else in the house) love it."

L
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So I don't see how people can separate their money and their life. To me, money is so entangled with life, that I see it as simply enabling you to live the life you want to.

I think so too. One of the rules was "work as a usher so you can see movies for free." Yuck!! My free time is sufficiently valuable that I don't want to use it up doing something unsatisfying like being an usher (apoloiges to all the ushers out there).

If entertainment budget is so tight that paying for a movie kills me, I'll just quit going to movies for a while. If I need to spend my free earning extra money, I'm going to figure out something to do that pays well enough that it's worth my time. But being an usher? I've got better uses of my life energy.
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My wife is particularly attached to two moving boxes filled with Christmas lights. We have never put them up and never will, but we have moved them around for years. I think she wants to be buried with them.

you could always put them up on her grave. it'd be more entertaining than flowers. just think of all the kids who would say, "wow, what a cool grave!"

;^)

zay34kc3
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Okay,

How the heck did you find that article, intercst?

I did write a commentary on the 9 steps article your referred to previously, but I don't think you had the chance to reply to me.

Petey
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Yes, I'm working that down, selling valuable bit and clearing away clutter. I find it's a good approach as I like having less clutter, a clearer space (makes the place look larger) and makes me even less inclined to go and buy the next thing I "need".

Petey

Anyone else out there struggling with getting rid of accumulated junk?




Seattle Pioneer
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Well everyone has their limits on what they'll do to save money.

To some the main goal is get their monthly spend down to something where they are financially secure much faster. There are limits on how much that is sensible though. My gf hardly spends anything on herself, to the point where she doesn't do anythiny/buy anything that she likes. To me that's too strict and takes all the fun out of life.

Petey


I think so too. One of the rules was "work as a usher so you can see movies for free." Yuck!! My free time is sufficiently valuable that I don't want to use it up doing something unsatisfying like being an usher (apoloiges to all the ushers out there).

If entertainment budget is so tight that paying for a movie kills me, I'll just quit going to movies for a while. If I need to spend my free earning extra money, I'm going to figure out something to do that pays well enough that it's worth my time. But being an usher? I've got better uses of my life energy.
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Anyone else out there struggling with getting rid of accumulated junk?

I think I'm genetically a "no junk" person, but my BF is the opposite. The easiest way to minimize junk is to not accumulate it in the first place. If it doesn't come in the house in the first place, then you don't have to move it out of the house during the next de-junking session.

Of course, that doesn't seem to explain how to get rid of junk that seems to reproduce on its own. My DBF's basement is now a sea of old Macintosh parts, and I'm trying to figure out how those computer parts sexually reproduced. Genetic similarity to rabbits, possibly?

CK
(who's convinced that missing socks in the dryer transform themselves into wire hangers)
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I think so too. One of the rules was "work as a usher so you can see movies for free." Yuck!! My free time is sufficiently valuable that I don't want to use it up doing something unsatisfying like being an usher (apoloiges to all the ushers out there).

I think that what they were referring to was being an usher at a stage theater, not a movie theater. Many stage theaters operate on very tight budgets and rely on volunteer ushers to keep costs down and production value up. As for the value of your time, stage theater tickets are much more expensive than movie tickets, there is some value in the social aspect, and you're doing a community service.

Jim - never ushered, but known people who have
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Rkmacdonald wrote:
<I am afraid that these rules for living just don't fit me very well. If I were to live like this, it would feel like a death sentence. In fact, I would return to the workforce to avoid having to do many of these things.
For instance, there is nothing I like less than yard work and home repairs, and I really enjoy hiring someone to do it for me.
So I don't see how people can separate their money and their life. To me, money is so entangled with life, that I see it as simply enabling you to live the life you want to.
It strikes me that people who can live for next to nothing must have a completely different personality than I do.>


Hey Russ! Both you and Sykemol are living JUST like the article suggests. You're using "your time, money and energy most efficiently" by making the above observations.

The article isn't insisting you have to use any of its money-saving techniques, or that you have to live on next to nothing. What it's saying to me is: be a tightwad concerning the things you don't care about, so you can spend your money on the things you do. Prioritize, and if you find yourself with a limited budget, you'll know what's important to spend money on and what isn't.

For you, it's important to hire someone to do things you hate to do. Sounds like a pretty good way to spend money to me. I do it all the time.... On the other hand, I just don't care if my pants come from a thrift shop.

I think the only difference between you and those who live on next to nothing is your budget, not your personality.

Pablum (whose been inextricably tangled up with money all his life)
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Author: Pablum Date: 10/15/01 10:30 AM Number: 53277
The article isn't insisting you have to use any of its money-saving techniques, or that you have to live on next to nothing. What it's saying to me is: be a tightwad concerning the things you don't care about, so you can spend your money on the things you do. Prioritize, and if you find yourself with a limited budget, you'll know what's important to spend money on and what isn't.

Agreed!

Now, I need find some way to do something about the limited budget!!

Russ
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This topic is something for the getting organized list to which I subscribed recently..

For the past 16 months I've been either travelling abroad or living with my brother (6 weeks) and now I've come back to my own tiny apartment.
It just amazes me how much junk I accumulated over time... however it is not so much that I'm such a shopper, it is more that I hardly ever throw things away, like clothes which don't fit anymore.
Also, while I loathe shopping for clothes and don't care enough about music to buy CDs, I truly enjoy shopping for food and tend to buy more books than I read.

As too much shopping for food makes me put on more weight than I need I decided to stop preparing a lot of food myself and just picknick, eat out or take away. As I live in a university town I can dine out for just 2,50-3 USD in the university mess hall, so this is not much more expensive than preparing my own food and much more social as I can make new friends there. So, I've thrown away all spices and herbs that have been cluttering my cupboards for so many years.

I've also removed most cook books and magazines. For the moment they are stored in another house but I think of throwing them away as my computer with a handy index system crashed.
I will stop buying so many books unless they are really really so good to have that borrowing them from the library doesn't make sense.

Actually I will need to shop for clothes as I discovered that my best clothes are cycling clothes and most other clothes I own no longer fit (waistline prob) so they must be thrown out or given away..

In total I understand that it actually was a good move to stay in a tiny 3x4 m apartment as it forces me to keep my possessions small. For years I didn't even have my own fridge or telly! (but I now am on my way to the 5th computer in 14 years and my 6th bicycle)

Cyclist
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"If something's useable and has value, I'll donate it to a thrift shop. If not, I'll dump it. One of the luxuries in life I'm glad to be able to afford is the ability to throw junk out, rather than spending time selling it."

Another alternative to chucking it or donating it-convert it to something useful. For example, when we recently remodelled the kitchen, I dispatched the 50 year old castiron sink to the backyard, and made a planter out of it. It looks pretty funky and cute sitting out there with bright orange impatiens in it! Very "Martha Stewart" of me if I don't say so myself. Also, we took the old knotty pine kitchen cabinets out and reinstalled them in the garage, which provides my BF with storage galore for all his woodworking stuff. The knotty pine panelling went to my employer, who reused recycled it in one of the many ongoing projects they have around here.
Well, you get the idea-stuff evolves to serve other purposes. Anything but sending it to the landfill!
Reuse - Recycle.....and think how virtuous you will feel whilst doing it!
2002orbust


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arrete - now if I could just get the kids to move out all their stuff..

When I was 19 my parents sold the house to move into a 27 foot motorhome. Needless to say, there was a lot of junk to move out of the house where I and 5 sibblings grew up. My parents assigned one room in the house as the "disposal" room, where things they did not want, (or was not theirs,) was put for a week. After the week passed, they assumed we did not want it either, and had the weekly truck for the salvation army-type agency come pick it up. Definite deadlines work best.

Mom also had all the letters and personal papers that one collects over the years with 6 kids that she couldn't pack with her. She asked the local Fire Chief if it was OK to burn them. He figured it would be a quick one and said OK, but it turned out to be a bonfire that lasted two days. I don't share her pack rat genes quite to the same extent, and having to pack up our entire house every time a hurricane threatens has helped me not to get too sentimental. Fortunately, we are in a stronger house now, and packing is less of an issue, but it only takes watching one friend's house blow away to know that stuff isn't what counts.

InParadise
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<<4. Don't throw out anything if it is still usable. That means even if it's useful for a purpose other than what it was originally intended for.>>

Generally, I found the suggestions for frugal living to be good but I didn't find anything new for my purposes. I disagree with #4 above, though. My theory these days is to work fairly diligently to de junk my life. When I find things that I don't expect to use is the reasonably near term and that don't have sentimental value, my aim is to try to summon up the will to throw them out...

Anyone else out there struggling with getting rid of accumulated junk?


With me, the problem is that the junk often comes in so handy. I repaired the horn button on my motorcyle by using a drill as a cheap lathe and turning a scrap piece of plastic to the correct shape (imagine a little plastic top hat). The dealer only sold the entire horn/signal/light-switch assembly, for $120. In an emergency, I once fixed a sump pump base with some car parts. I once had a pump with a bad motor, and a guy gave me his motor because it was attached to a broken pump. The same thing happened with a cordless phone, where mine had a bad battery and mircophone, and I got a donor that had been droopped, leaving most parts broken except...guess what. I've used 10 year old paint for a Pinewood Derby car that needed to be a special color.

Of course, the key is to remember whether a particular piece of junk is in the basement, garage, hall closet...
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For you "junk" heads --

Balance the LBYM book with this one:

"Clutter Control" by Jeff Campbell
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0440503396/qid=1003245202/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_7_1/103-1474039-8285414



CPAScott
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Better yet, get it from your library. My biggest clutter problem is books. And CD's. Oh, and too many clothes. And an unnatural number of shoes. I also like hats. And since I'm a guy, lots and lots of tools. And did I mention my fascinating collection of antiquated computer equipment?

randyy - collecting dust since 1902
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My biggest clutter problem is books. And CD's.

amazon.com will let you sell your unwanted used books and CDs. I've listed many of mine -- some may sell, some may not, but its one way to try and get rid of things while making some $

You can also try eBay!


The library is a better idea 'cause its FREE.



CPAScott
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Re clutter problems:

Have I recommended www.flylady.net yet?

Have a 27-fling boogie!

Vickifool
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