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A few months back I posted a message about a number of violent attacks that had taken place against Orthodox Jews in my neighborhood.

For any of you interested in an update, I recently received a letter from various community leaders addressing the issue:

http://jewish.us/security_letter.jpg

I found it interesting (and disappointing) that they thought it necessary to tell people to call 911 if they see someone in danger on Shabbos or Yom Tov.
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I found it interesting (and disappointing) that they thought it necessary to tell people to call 911 if they see someone in danger on Shabbos or Yom Tov.

Why? Isn't it pikuach nefesh?

Elan
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<<I found it interesting (and disappointing) that they thought it necessary to tell people to call 911 if they see someone in danger on Shabbos or Yom Tov.>>

Why? Isn't it pikuach nefesh?


That's why he was disappointed. Everyone should know that 911 should (and not just should, but must) be called without having to be told.
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That's why he was disappointed. Everyone should know that 911 should (and not just should, but must) be called without having to be told.

I suspect that many Orthodox people might hesitate or be reluctant to do so. It doesn't hurt to make them consider the option before there's an incident, so that they make the right decision under duress. Forethought is the most important element of disaster preparedness.

Elan
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<<That's why he was disappointed. Everyone should know that 911 should (and not just should, but must) be called without having to be told.>>

I suspect that many Orthodox people might hesitate or be reluctant to do so. It doesn't hurt to make them consider the option before there's an incident, so that they make the right decision under duress. Forethought is the most important element of disaster preparedness.


Only ignorant ones (which may include large segments of Charedim) might hesitate. In our synagogue, a few months ago, someone fell ill and sort of fainted. Within seconds, one of the Rabbis made a beeline to his office to call emergency services. Before he even got there, 2 or 3 doctors with cellphones had them out and were dialing. These actions took place despite the fact that there was a Sheriffs Deputy sitting in a car near the front gate.

I agree that it certainly can't hurt to remind people that calling 911 is the right thing do do in an emergency any day of the week.
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Why? Isn't it pikuach nefesh?

Precisely. So why should it be necessary to remind people?

Do the authors of that letter think frum people too stupid to call 911 when they see a Jew being beaten in the street? Just because it's Shabbos?

I don't know what's more depressing -- that they thought it necessary to include such a comment, or the fact that they might be right, and it really was necessary to include that comment.

Shabbat Shalom.
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