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complete soundtrack--and then some!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPNbHmuf6zM

How wonderful to catch every nuance in the music without distracting visuals ;-)

about the music in WoZ:

In addition to the well-known vocals by [composer Harold] Harburg and [lyricist "Yip"] Arlen, nearly the entire film was underscored by arranger Herbert Stothart, using a mixture of instrumental-only leitmotifs composed for some of the characters, instrumental references to some of the vocals, and traditional and classical pieces. ...

Herbert Stothart...won an Academy Award for Best Original Score. Some of that underscoring was, of course, based on Harburg and Arlen's songs.

...

Although an orchestra underscores nearly the entire film, approximately the last third of the movie contains no songs. Once Dorothy and her cohorts are handed the task of killing the Wicked Witch, the mood of the film goes a bit darker. This was not originally intended—the last three songs in the film, "The Jitterbug," the vocal reprise of "Over The Rainbow," and "The Triumphant Return" were all excised from the film before its official release.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_selections_in_The_Wiza...

PS--
Howard Arlen composed over 500 songs, including Stormy Weather, Lydia the Tattooed Lady (from a Marx Bros movie), and The Man That Got Away. After his death, Irving Berlin paid tribute: "He wasn't as well known as some of us, but he was a better songwriter than most of us and he will be missed by all of us."

Yip Harbug wrote the lyrics for many famous songs, including Brother Can You Spare a Dime, April in Paris, and It's Only a Paper Moon. He championed racial and gender equality and union politics. He also was an ardent critic of religion. Although never a communist, he was a member of the Socialist Party and considered radical and was blacklisted.

PPS--Speaking of the Marx Bros, when my grandson was talking to me on Thanksgiving, he referred to something "bross." I was familiar with what he was talking about and informed him that "bros" is short for brothers ;-)
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oops. Make that Yip Harberg and Harold Arlen. First names entered after the fact--and incorrectly.
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Have you been watching "The Crown"? I have, so I know what the expression "Friend of Dorothy" means. Do you? I suspect most Brits would know. Learn something every day.

CNC
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This was not originally intended—the last three songs in the film, "The Jitterbug," the vocal reprise of "Over The Rainbow," and "The Triumphant Return" were all excised from the film before its official release.

The film was overlong in the first cut. Louis Mayer insisted that “Over the Rainbow” be cut as well - both of them -, because nobody would want to hear a girl sing a slow ballad in a farmyard early in the movie. In fact it was cut during previews, but then restored after hellacious infighting between the director and executives. The reprise, along with the other songs, stayed on the cutting room floor.

I’ve noticed that many musicals are frontloaded with songs. I think it’s because as the dramatic pace picks up as you roll to the conclusion it’s hard to stop everything for a tune and then pick up again and regather that momentum. Almost every Broadway show we go to has significantly more music before intermission than after. Having never written a musical (ah, something I could do as Covid relief, if only I had talent), I wonder if that’s the reason.
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I've known what "Friend of Dorothy" means for decades. At least since I moved to San Francisco and watched my first Pride Parade.

I saw the first few episodes of The Crown at DD's a couple years back.
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Now you mention it, I did notice when I was in pit orchestras for shows that the music before intermission had more pages than the music after.

I just looked up Wicked. 11 songs in Act I, 9 in Act II:

https://wicked.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_songs

Here's South Pacific--12 & 9:

https://wicked.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_songs

Sound of Music--14 & 11:

https://wicked.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_songs

Cats--12 & 11:

https://wicked.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_songs

Miss Saigon--20 & 14:

https://stageagent.com/shows/musical/1590/miss-saigon/songs

Maybe The Band's Visit had no intermission--I can't find a list sorted by Act.
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The film was overlong in the first cut.

I don't think such a thing exists. It wasn't "overlong", it was longer than the traditional run-length and executives didn't like it because you get less showings per day in the theaters. It's all about money, not the quality of the film.

Aliens suffers from that. Get the director's cut, it is much better (not that the original was bad...it was quite good!). They only include maybe an extra <10 minutes of footage, but it adds so much (including why Ripley bonded with Newt so quickly).

It's only overlong if it adds nothing to the story/experience. Cutting "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" clearly doesn't fall into that category.

Also, I think if it is done well one can insert singing/dancing into a story throughout a movie (or play). West Side Story comes to mind. They did it well, and integrated it into the plot. Instead of having exposition (e.g. talking about the coming "rumble"), they sang about it (e.g. "Tonight"; which as I recall was intercut with Maria singing a contrasting version about her upcoming meeting with Tony). Yeah, stopping everything so someone can break into song sucks. The few musicals I can think of don't do that (e.g. just thought of Hello, Dolly with Streisand; and Grease).

1poorguy (hasn't been to a Broadway play, just seen the movies)

P.S. I note that music also used to suffer this. Songs used to be limited to about 3 minutes because otherwise radio stations wouldn't play them. The Beatles changed that. They had long songs, and if you didn't play them you would lose listeners because it was The Beatles. I forget now which song specifically changed that policy. Maybe "Hey Jude"? In those days you had to play The Beatles or you were dead.
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P.S. I note that music also used to suffer this. Songs used to be limited to about 3 minutes because otherwise radio stations wouldn't play them. The Beatles changed that. They had long songs, and if you didn't play them you would lose listeners because it was The Beatles. I forget now which song specifically changed that policy. Maybe "Hey Jude"? In those days you had to play The Beatles or you were dead.

Richard Harris’ “MacArthur Park” was released in 1967. “Hey Jude” came in 1968.

Mary Hopkins “Those Were The Days” and “Hey Jude” were released at almost the exact same time. (They chased each other up the charts.)

Heck, Dylan released “Like A Rolling Stone” in 1965, although the record company sent edited versions to radio stations on single for play.

Part of the reason for the shorter single was radio play, of course, but part was technology. As you record longer songs you need more “grooves” (well, there’s really only one, of course) and that means they have to be spaced closer together. Since stereo records achieved the effect by having one track oscillate up and down, and the other back and forth - and then turning the whole thing at 45 degrees, the “width” of the groove dictates how much much you can jam into a 45 before you start impinging on the next groove.

The physical limit is about 7:30, although with deft engineering and precise cutting equipment you can get a tiny bit more than that, but you begin to lose dimension as the grooves space ever more closely together. And skipping becomes easier.

Other long songs which came after: “Bridge Over Troubled Water” “Bohemian Rhapsody”. I’d include “Sympathy for the Devil” but that was only released as a single in Europe.

I remember playing MacArthur Park as a DJ, loved it because it was a good bathroom break record, but it was prone to skipping; you’d have to have somebody watch the studio while you were gone in case it happened. Often we’d just put a penny on the tone arm to weigh it down, but that destroyed the plastic pretty fast.
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Almost every Broadway show we go to has significantly more music before intermission than after.

This phenomenon is not confined to musicals. Modern plays, dance performances, comedy acts, and other forms of live entertainment all tend to have a shorter second act than first. I always thought this made sense from the viewer/audience perspective since peoples’ energy and attention span often wane as the show goes on no matter how good it is.

Pete
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I did put a "?" after "Hey Jude". I recall seeing a documentary which dealt with that, but can't remember the song that broke the <3 min limit. I see "I Am The Walrus" was released in '67, and it was a longer one (4:33). Maybe that was the one?

To this day I HATE it when they play the truncated version of Light My Fire. Released in '67, the "radio version" cuts out the instrumental portion and is very jarring if you know how it's supposed to sound. The proper version is 7 min long, but the radio version is under 3.
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I’ve noticed that many musicals are frontloaded with songs. I think it’s because as the dramatic pace picks up as you roll to the conclusion it’s hard to stop everything for a tune and then pick up again and regather that momentum. Almost every Broadway show we go to has significantly more music before intermission than after. Having never written a musical (ah, something I could do as Covid relief, if only I had talent), I wonder if that’s the reason.

The first tune after the intermission is called the "10:40 number" because it occurs at about 10:40 at night and reminds the audience they are still watching a musical.
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