No. of Recommendations: 6
Considering picking up some BA in the current 'dip'?

Incredible read on the situation surrounding the 737 MAX 8 debacle.

Lots of direct input from pilots' experience with Boeing's MCAS system, with heavy criticism of Boeing's poor documentation, training.

Taking from their reports, these pilots quickly killed the computer, and "SAFELY FLEW THE DAMN PLANE TO DESTINATION".

A fifteen minute read; worth the time.

https://www.theatlantic.com/notes/2019/03/heres-what-was-on-...

James Fallows
4:47 PM / March 13, 2019
Here’s What Was on the Record About Problems With the 737 Max
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No. of Recommendations: 5
Interesting reading at the link to the Atlantic article.

From one of the reports:

I think it is unconscionable that a manufacturer, the FAA, and the airlines would have pilots flying an airplane without adequately training, or even providing available resources and sufficient documentation to understand the highly complex systems that differentiate this aircraft from prior models. The fact that this airplane requires such jury rigging to fly is a red flag. Now we know the systems employed are error prone--even if the pilots aren't sure what those systems are, what redundancies are in place, and failure modes.

That is about what I have been saying, why does it need an additional stall prevention system when stick shakers and stick pushers have been SOP for years?

Another report quoted in that article noted the autothrottle failed to perform and the pilot had to correct that failure.

Is that the future of being a pilot, correcting for automation system mistakes?

And people think autonomous cars will be feasible?

Steve
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No. of Recommendations: 8
Well, as per the Seattle Times article I posted earlier, the "fix" should come reasonably fast:


On Monday, before the grounding of the 737 MAX, Boeing outlined “a flight control software enhancement for the 737 MAX,” that it’s been developing since soon after the Lion Air crash.

According to a detailed FAA briefing to legislators, Boeing will change the MCAS software to give the system input from both angle-of-attack sensors. It will also limit how much MCAS can move the horizontal tail in response to an erroneous signal. And when activated, the system will kick in only for one cycle, rather than multiple times. Boeing also plans to update pilot training requirements and flight crew manuals to include MCAS. ...



Leaves the question - if MCAS was deemed so essential that it would remain active even upon Autopilot disengagement - will the half-castration of that feature upset the balance the other way?

That is, instead of mercilessly pushing down the plane upon sensor malfunction, will there in future be a hightened risk of the system no longer being powerful enough to deal with the actual stall conditions it was designed to counteract?
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<<Leaves the question - if MCAS was deemed so essential that it would remain active even upon Autopilot disengagement - will the half-castration of that feature upset the balance the other way? >>


Doesn't really matter. It's more important that the news media and social media Xperts (like those on this board) be appeased.



Seattle Pioneer
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That is, instead of mercilessly pushing down the plane upon sensor malfunction, will there in future be a hightened risk of the system no longer being powerful enough to deal with the actual stall conditions it was designed to counteract?


I read the other day that an analysis of thousands of flights among major US airlines showed that the system had never been triggered.

I haven't seen any information on whether in the absence of the system, the plane would actually be "unsafe" or if this just means a few hours of additional flight simulator training.
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Not yet.

There is a distinct chance that the 737 max models will *never* again carry passengers. Software fix or no software fix, if the passengers refuse to flu on them, the airlines will dump them.

So, before I consider investing in BA, I'd like to figure out how much it might cost them to permanently ground all those jets, and lose all those future sales of those models.
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No. of Recommendations: 3
MarkR writes,

There is a distinct chance that the 737 max models will *never* again carry passengers. Software fix or no software fix, if the passengers refuse to flu on them, the airlines will dump them.

So, before I consider investing in BA, I'd like to figure out how much it might cost them to permanently ground all those jets, and lose all those future sales of those models.

</snip>


It only took 3 crashes in the space of 12 months to kill the de Havilland Comet (first commercial jetliner) back in the early 1950's.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Comet#Operational...

I'm looking for an entry point on Boeing below $150. Losing the MAX program will easily chop the company's value in half.

intercst
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