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No. of Recommendations: 8
Only 13 years old.....a star is born on the X-Factor. Prodigiously talented for her age.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU_dBDccruI
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No. of Recommendations: 3
BTW, don't be fooled. On the X-Factor, they made her out to be new to being in the spotlight.


As a 10 year old, she already had a big solo part on Broadway in Les Miserables


Hard to believe this is a 10-year-old's voice.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFU5cvtUM7g&feature=relat...
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No. of Recommendations: 1
inherently incredibly stage savvy -- clearly, some are born with it.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
At first I was afraid you meant someone who looked like Susan Boyle, but then figured I can keep my finger on the mouse and quickly shut it off if it is.

~aj
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No. of Recommendations: 1
inherently incredibly stage savvy -- clearly, some are born with it.

I have no doubt there's some innate ability there.

I also have no doubt there's already years of training and practice there as well to bring out that ability and make the most of it.

I suspect she's been taking song and dance (and probably acting) lessons since she was 5 or 6. And maybe as young as 3. And working hard at them.

--Peter
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No. of Recommendations: 0
And even knowing nothing about her I have no doubt that you are right.

But I was on stage continuously for 10 years in a group that I co-founded
years ago, and i can say with certainty that some folks who "decide to try
acting" simply do NOT 'have it'. It matters not how hard they work or how
dedicated or how much they 'believe in themselves' -- their sense of finesse
and of the 'flow' of natural interactions is pedestrian and awkward and
seemingly cannot change even after show after show and hundreds of hours
of training and rehearsal. And some others will breeze through town, fill
in a part having never stepped on stage in their lives, and blow the audience
and other actors away with their sense of authenticity and 'presence'.
I do believe that a LOT can be learned and utilized -- and, perhaps more
importantly, or at least as important, bad, self-defeating habits realized and abandoned.
From my experience though, someone like 'little Carly' here, felt at home
on stage from the very start. I did from my first moment, and It feels, literally,
like stepping onto the stage is like stepping into a warm pool of an utterly
positive medium that completely supports your every move. Nothing
quite like it.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
But I was on stage continuously for 10 years in a group that I co-founded
years ago, and i can say with certainty that some folks who "decide to try
acting" simply do NOT 'have it'.



I tend to agree with the "inherent" ability explanation. Certainly practice can sharpen and hone what you have. But if you don't have it, you don't have it. No amount of practice will help.

Same thing with sports. Like pitching in baseball. The ability to throw 90+ mph fastball is a very rare trait. If you can do it consistently, you have a decent shot at the Majors. There are people who have pitched for years and years, and will never be able to hit 90 mph. Same can be said for speed. Jay Leno also said once that being a funny comedian is also a have it or don't have it trait.
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No. of Recommendations: 8
But I was on stage continuously for 10 years in a group that I co-founded
years ago, and i can say with certainty that some folks who "decide to try
acting" simply do NOT 'have it'.


Yep.

I come from the other side - music. I sang and started to learn an instrument in grade school. After showing some aptitude, I took private lessons. I continued through high school, sitting first chair clarinet in my junior and senior years. I went to college to continue my music studies.

It was there I learned that I really didn't have that innate ability. What I have is the ability to learn things quickly - which is a good thing, but it's not a substitute for that bit of raw talent.

I quit music as a profession in my sophomore year of college. But I continue it as a hobby. I can sing in time and on pitch. But I don't have a voice people would pay to listen to. I can play a couple of instruments decently, even picking up a couple new ones just in the last 5 or 6 years. Right now, I'm playing bass and singing in front of people on a weekly basis.

But I'm no professional. I don't "have it". I could quit work and practice for hours each day and I have no doubt that I'd improve. I might even be able to make some money at music. But I still wouldn't "have it".

But all is not lost. I still enjoy making music even if I can't WOW a judge on X-Factor. I do have a lot of fun with it.

And I've recently discovered that I may "have it" in another area. I seem to do really well at public speaking and teaching. I do feel extremely comfortable there, and get a lot of positive feedback. I'm working on that part of things now.

--Peter
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