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I've often been asked, "What do you old folks do now that you're retired?"

Well..I'm fortunate to have a few friends who have chemical engineering backgrounds, and one of the things we enjoy most is turning beer, wine, Scotch, and margaritas into urine.

And we're pretty damn good at it, too.

<BG>

Horace
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I've often been asked, "What do you old folks do now that you're retired?"

Well..I'm fortunate to have a few friends who have chemical engineering backgrounds, and one of the things we enjoy most is turning beer, wine, Scotch, and margaritas into urine.



and you're pretty good at turning -something- into BS



(>:
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one of the things we enjoy most is turning beer, wine, Scotch, and margaritas into urine.

If you drink Bud, it would be more accurate to say that you turn it back into urine.

--fleg
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Well..I'm fortunate to have a few friends who have chemical engineering backgrounds, and one of the things we enjoy most is turning beer, wine, Scotch, and margaritas into urine.

And we're pretty damn good at it, too.


I've chosen to pursue an extensive study of the juniper berry in all its uses. So far I haven't gotten past number 2, but I expect to be published someday.

Phil
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""What do you old folks do now that you're retired?" "

I get up each morning and enjoy the sunrise.

Take a short walk, and then make breakfast and read the WSJ from end to end.

Then I check the email and boards. Maybe watch Jeopardy! on TV.

A few times a week, I go to the gym and work out without gigantic crowds.

I have hundreds of ham radio friends, travel all over the country. THe first five years, I traveled all over the world.

I drive about 25,000 miles a year having fun, attending conventions that interest me (I have two main hobbies, plus 3 or 4 other major interests).

I got roped into being officers in two local clubs.....but that is interesting and really doesn't take that much time.....

I can play my music insrument a few times a week and learn new songs.

I watch some TV......

I'm usually taking about 8 weeks of travelling a year now..slowed down a bit, but in the past 8 years, been in 48 states. SPend a week with sister and family at thanksgiving....

The nice thing is you don't have to rush, rush rush....

I eat breakfast with former co-worker who is much younger than I....about every 3-4 weeks.

Most of my co-workers got laid off and are off doing other things in other places. Don't miss the job...it left me, I didn't leave it.....the telecom meltdown.

I don't need their money. Why work for free? I'd just pile up more money and pay another half million in taxes if I worked till 66. I couldn't spend it all.

t.
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<<Thoughts on retirement >>


Working is overrated.



Seattle Pioneer
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Probably the best thing about being shed of the rat race is that I get along much better with DW than I did while I was busy traveling all over the country and other parts of the world. I used to work all the time, as in all the time. Now, I have time to enjoy the mornings, afternoons, and nights. More sex with DW has been one unexpected benefit. Few arguments with DW has been another. Doing things together with DW is another. Yes, I go they gym and work out. I also eat a little more and drink a little more. We moved to the mountains, where most of the urine flows downhill. Life has been good, even with the market going to hell.
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One great thing about being retired in this economy is not having to constantly worry about losing my job. OTOH, another investing year like 2008 and I can start worrying that I won't be able to find a job.
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One of the best things about retirement is the drop in my blood pressure. It is unbelievably relaxing to have no one constantly pressuring you to do something, go somewhere, deal with somebody, etc. And thanks to no more driving in traffic I've become a much calmer driver, too.

The greatest benefit is just to be able to stop and smell the roses ... or not ... as I see fit.

-drip
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I wake up every morning with nothing to do and by bed time I find I only got half of it done.
Bob
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I wake up every morning with nothing to do and by bed time I find I only got half of it done.



very true.

but never feel bad it didn't get done.


-
.... spend much of the day with nothing to do but wonder why i'm not bored.
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The greatest benefit is just to be able to stop and smell the roses ...

It's great to have a wife who likes to grow them:
http://grumpypix.multiply.com/photos/album/3/Online#246

Regards,

Grumpy
--has to wait again until Spring for the roses...
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I wake up every morning with nothing to do and by bed time I find I only got half of it done.
Bob

--------


Workaholic! :)

AM
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Grumpy,

In Santa Barbara, the suburb of Montecito actually, roses seem to bloom pretty much year round. Our gardener prunes them, and that arrests the blooms temporarily. By then my wife's daffodils and my agapanthus are blooming.

db
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Retirement is like going back to the childhood you left 40-50 years ago and not having a care in the world. It's a blast and I highly recommend it. My typical activities follow:

Mass on Saturday night
Golf 3 days a week
Gym 2 days a week
Volunteer at hospital 1 afternoon a week
Volunteer marshal at golf course 1 afternoon a week
Read the paper every morning
Watch the news every afternoon
Browse the internet daily
Ham Radio a lot and radio contesting a lot
Professional football fan and tailgater during the season

As long as I keep the wife happy and supplied with money for her cross-stiching and needlepoint life is great. You should try it sometime.

Regards,

ImAGolfer (retired '03)
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A big part of my retirement has been about returning to my first love, Spanish. It was my favorite subject in school and I even won a trophy for being best Spanish student in my high school. That got me an all-expense-paid summer in Mexico on a sister-city student-exchange program. Unfortunately the teaching methods of that era (1965) were not geared toward speaking and understanding, but rather to grammar and reading. So I could barely communicate to my host family or anyone else, something I spent my working years wishing I could remedy. And unfortuantely when I went back to that same Mexican city a year ago for the first time since then, the sister-city program had just been discontinued the year before.

After a year of college Spanish I gave it up since back then the only thing you could do with a foreign language was teach, as far as my limited knowledge went, and I was not teacher material. If I had it to do over again, I'd take the academic route, studying Spanish and Portuguese, probably medieval literature and/or linguistics.

35 years later I wasted no time. I headed down to Costa Rica for a three-week immersion program just three months after retiring. Then I enrolled in the BA program in Spanish at the local university, interrupting my studies for a month in Guatemala and a month in Honduras. (Immersion programs are a very economical way to travel and study. It was $165/week for room and board with a family plus four hours of private lessons per day in Guatemala.) I graduated in 2003 and it was by far the most fun I ever had in college.

I also got certified as a medical interpreter at the local community college and for a couple of years volunteered doing that at a couple of free medical clinics and later took the H&R Block class and got state-certified to do taxes, so I could do more work with Spanish-speaking folks.

Since quitting work in 2000 I've been to Latin America nine times for a total of over seven months, mostly on my own, with DW coming down to join me for part of several trips. The most recent trip was a year ago with a cultural exchange group where folks from OR spent a month living with Costa Rican families in various parts of the country, after which we hosted a Costa Rican couple in our home for a week last September. That month cost less than $900 (plus air-fare) and I had a family of my own to practice with for hours every day. I'm planning another trip to CR soon to tutor English in a CR high school.

In the meantime I've started going to Spanish conversation meetups I found online and taking intro Portuguese.

Other than all that, I mainly devote myself to loafing.

--fleg
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