Skip to main content
Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 0
Thank heaven for whisky, cigs, and lolcats.  I strongly recommend that you stock up on your coping mechanism of choice for dealing with what's coming.

Yeah, I'm running low on optimism these days.  Seriously.  If there were an ETF that tracked my level of optimism, shorting it would be an excellent idea.  Unless something very interesting happens between now and morning, the market's going to be down big at the open.  And this is on top of already being down 10% for the year (all three weeks of it).

I'm pretty sure this is just the beginning.

Much of my negativity towards the future of the market comes from my experience with the tech crash.  I made my first attempt at investing back in 2001.  The Nasdaq had dropped about 70% from its high and recovered a bit, so I figured it was safe to say we'd hit the bottom of the tech crash.  If you look at the chart for the following two years, you'll see why it took me until 2006 to work up the nerve to start investing again.

The lesson:  Calling a bottom based on arbitrary numbers is pointless and hazardous to your portfolio.  The best you can do is try to figure out what's driving the market down, and assume that the bottom is near once it's no longer a factor.  This isn't going to be over until fear wins out over greed and transparency wins out over fraud.

By the way, have you ever seen what happens when somebody actually tries to catch a falling knife?  I have.  It's not a pretty sight.  Unless you enjoy bloodshed and stitches, I strongly advise against it.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

I also got into the markets back in 2001 and bought into drops thinking I was getting bargains.  Eventually I exited with what little money I had left and gave up on the markets altogether.

I find it ironic that I am now facing the same situation that I faced back then - just when I decided to get back in!

 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Global markets are in turmoil as I write this.  you're very right, this morning will get very, very ugly.  The U.S. is still the world's number one consumer and weakness here has huge effects abroad.

I however don't believe that a person should completely write of the market in times like this.  Value investors spread their investments out over time and bear markets are honestly when you will get the most bang for your buck.  If you invested in quality companies with strong fundamentals from the very beginning, your companies will survive.  And honestly times like this are the worst time to change that philosophy because this is when value investors thrive.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

I think my first investing experience, under the advisement of a so called expert, was about the same time.  About 1/3rd of 6-8 years of hard savings wiped out in about 3 months...

Wise call... 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Bear, I've been writing about the lack of capitulation.  I bet you'll start to see some now.  I can't imagine what its like to have a couple years worth of gains dashed in 3 weeks.  Poof!

Good luck bottom calling Trojan...

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

If you invest in quality companies spread out over several sectors over long periods of time you don't need to call a bottom.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Anybody remember 1987? I most certainly do and it wasn't pretty. But now as then, the key to thriving in boom or bust is diversification and patience.

 Yes, grasshopper, PATIENCE. 

 Smart money knows when sloth becomes a virtue.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Well, you know, it's true that things sure look dire, but look at it this way -- at least things are much clearer now than they were a couple of weeks ago. If you know (or think you know, anyway :)) which way the market's going to go, you can make money -- it's only when you're not sure that things are bad. 

(P.S. My first investing experience was in 2003, so that may have something to do with my unbridled optimism. :P)

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

This is not the tech bust.  Those companies had NO EARNINGS and were so overbought it was ridiculous.  Fundamentals didn't exist.

This is more like 1987 where the market is actually priced pretty well, but there are external influences on the situation.  1987 had to do with an increase in volatility knocking out the "insurance" premiums on things being set with the futures markets. 

If you bought that dip in 1987 you made a ton, if you tried to buy in 2000, 2001 you got nailed.

There is so much cash sitting on the sidelines at this point that we ARE near a bottom.  I still expect a huge downmove (which today was NOT), but if you get a move over here like you did in Asia, you buy good companies and come out smelling like roses.

 The tech companies WENT AWAY.  The companies out there getting nailed now are benchmarks, bluechips, etc, and they aren't going anywhere, plus they are priced attractively already.

This is manipulation and planning.  Much too coordinated, much too timed.  Options moves last month showed this coming.  They will make a big push sometime soon and then pour their money in because this is not a recession, at least not any type of a serious recession.  So, a few hundred billion in CDO's disappeared, the actual mortgage issue is dissipating.  Rates are LOW and getting lower.  Resets are occurring at LOWER rates than they were previously.  Jobs are not being lost wholesale like they were in 2001.

 7 out of 8 of these busts are buying opportunities.  Bet on the 7.  Make no mistakes, the optimists will have to decline first, but as the gloom and doom shows, there are not many left.  Non-financials are not experiencing cratering in their earnings.  Eventually, that will be obvious and the gloom will be a real hard sell.   By then, the fast money will be in at the bottom.

 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

I have been investing since 1984 so I have had the fun of both making a lot of money and loosing a lot of money. You would think by now I would have learned from my mistakes, and I have some what but the market is still a surprising place and there is always opportunity to loose money. I'm supposed to say there is lots of opportunity to make money but things look rather bleak.

The one silver lining in all this is that it is an election year and I am hoping history repeats itself. October of 1992 was about the same prospect as we are seeing now, the market plunged below the begining of the year which is a stong indicator of recession. Then of course the first President Bush was elecected out of office and come Jan. - Feb. 1994 the market had one of the largest upswings in history followed by years of good growth. Lets see if history repeats itself. Stuff your money in a matress and wait for that upswing!

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

i've made more money in january than i did all of last year.. mainly because i stupidly was in cash for the first half of last year because i knew the housing bubble was going to crash only to see stocks go up....

so this year i have taken the approach of buying into extreme weakness and unloading same day to within one week....  this morning was very good to me on the gap down as several solar stocks that were already in free fall for several weeks bounced back 16% by this afternoon for a nice one day return...

the only piece of crap i still have long is FEED... #%#@ those chinese pigs... and SDTH another ag stock that i bought this morning at the gap down...

I understand your reasoning, and if the market rolls for a week I'll dip into an ultrashort..... but if your nimble and sitting at work with access to the net.... these one day crashes sure can be profitable if you understand basic technicals....

now i just need the chinese stocks to bounce tomorrow so I can unload FEED and SDTH

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Nobody answered better than STKITT. Read what he has to say over again then APPLY!

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

hey, you guys all sound like you've been arround a while I' 3 months in and what the hell, just as I start the whole damb thing falls to shit.  I watched for a while and put money in India, South America and China so I'm not that bad off but I hear things like sell short and the like.  I'm lost.  Now for the real question, I know that TTM will swell but I don't think it will happen for a while.  When do I buy?  I dont do day tradeing, or even weekly, but a year is a bit long for me, so how long befor the swell begins do I buy?  I think it will happen mid/ late 09.  Does any body out there see the same thing coming?  I also am vested in vices and long hawl co. now

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

I'm hesistant to try and call anything that the market is going to do, but I would point out that we're looking at a completely different situation than during the dot-com crash. While some of the economic consequences of what's going on right now may be more pronounced right now, the potential for the stock market to decline to the same extent seems highly unlikely.

In 2000 you had the twin attacks of a softening economy and sky-high valuations -- valuations the likes of which had really never been seen... Cisco at 100x earnings? Sure!

Our market wasn't particularly undervalued heading into this downturn, but the fact that it wasn't overvalued to nearly the same extent should keep losses within a relatively reasonable range.

A 50% drop in Cisco at 100x takes it to 50x, still overvalued at the time... A 50% drop in most stocks in this current market would leave them pretty cheap (not that I'm rooting for a 50% drop in anything!)...

matt

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Probably few recall 1974. It is worth a look, for inflation was beginning to roar. I knew that things of value went up in times of inflation, and it seemed that stock was an ownership of value. My holdings were decimated, for the market looks for earnings. OK, today's market hasn't even yet discovered just how much has been lost, and those who think they are looking at a bottom, now that the FED has spoken, have failed to listen for the dropped coin to hit the bottom of the chasm. I think we have a way to go and will hold cash. Our economy floats on a river of cash which flows through the banks, largely as directed by the investment bankers and brokerages - and until they can get their gps working again and get reoriented, I will be hesitant to accept their directions. In short, we are in deep dung.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Kopp: there is another fundamental difference this time that is worse than last time.  Back in 2000-01, we had a budget SURPLUS, the national debt was actually decreasing, and individuals and the country had built up equity.  Tax cuts and huge stupid credit expansions later, we have no room to stimulate the economy.  Also, banks are leveraged up way more than they were then, which will intensify losses.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

You guys say "be patient" and "long term" but you tell me to buy here.  Screw you.  I mean it.  Screw you for dishing out bad advice intentionally.  I know all about patience and diversification, that's why I'm calling B.S. on you bottom callers.  What man in his right mind is going to buy here only to watch his money wither?  So I can what...double down tomorrow and hope for twice the gains to break even?  No thank you.  I'll go short to hedge or cash to sit before I listen to you regurgitate partial Warren Buffet bullshit. 

P.S.  How's AAPL working out for you bandwagon-short-bus riders? Down 18% today...don't worry I'm sure it'll recover today.  HA HA HA

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Aapl?  Working out great since bought at $129 today.

Let's put some numbers on it...$20 Billion in cash approximately for about $25 in cash PER SHARE.  So, yank that out of the price of the stock and you are buying a company for about $100 that has earnings of $5/share growing at 30 to 40%.  Even if you slow growth down, you are getting in at a great price.  Add to that the fact that at SOME POINT, the cash will either be paid back via buybacks or via dividend or via buying some uber cool company with accretive earnings and you gotta think Aapl at $125 ish is a steal and a half. 

Furthermore, the earnings from iphone this quarter was $250 million or so.  But wait, they DEFER earnings on iphones over 24 months, so already you can bake in another $250 per quarter for the next 2 years, even if they sell not ONE MORE PHONE.  But they will.  So, when they've sold 10 million phones at the end of this year, they will be recognizing....over $700 million income just from the damn phone.  Just the phone is worth $20 per share. 

 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Nothing has changed in the last two days!

The housing bubble has burst and all the effects are yet to be felt. New home construction is at a 30 year low and layoffs in the ancillary industries are just now about to happen.

The wealth effect from percieved home equity gains has vanished and the housing consumer (who was responsible for much of the last 6 years of growth) is about to quit spending.

The market did a classic "dead cat bounce" today, but will continue its downward spirial tomorrow.

 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

I don't believe ANYONE can forecast these days, even an educated guess.  We have never, even in Canada, been so world wide connected in every respect from who we buy from, who we sell to, where we travel, where companies buy raw materials, how it affects their overall costs and selling value where applicable.

 I totally blame the high priced idiots who loaned all this money to people with nothing down for houses, obviously overextended with other debt- paying one credit card off with another at 18% int. on that money.

When we bought our first 3 houses you had to QUALIFY for a mortgage, after they investigated your credibility, and put down a DOWN PAYMENT !  This house we paid cash for, tho bigger was outside Metro Toronto area, so much less.  Not today, want it and want it now is the philosophy.   Does anyone sit down and do cash flow check before saying "Can we afford it"   Cars had down payments and credit check and even getting a credit card meant a credit history check.

Think the U.S particularly has "gone to hell in a handbasket".!   What surprises me is how many people fell into this trap. 

I could not sleep at night if were in this situation.  No mortgage, no debt, but no company pension and am OK.  Mostly fairly conservative investments so am doing basically nothing, except maybe dump a couple of stocks that have not done well, or badly over 5-10 yrs and don't see a great future.

Just my perhaps ultra conservative outlook.  This will not be solved easily and don't feel bailouts for the companies that screwed this up.  As well fire all those responsible for these decisions!  Buy the booze and cigarette stocks, they should do well!

N Lewis   (Toronto)

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

strongly agree with you, SpecBear.

This week is only technical rebound.

As per my deduction, after S&P 500 touchs 1,370 ; Nasdaq to 2,360 & TSX to 13,100 (I am from Canada), i.e. the short-term roof, the market will go down deeply again.

Bottom Signals are as followings,

1. Fed Benchmark cut down to 2% ;

2. Jobless rate worst in 20--25 yrs ;

3. At least after May 2008 ;  

4. some VIP (very important pig) in wall street in jail .

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Huh. I'm just going to keep putting money into things like FMD, ACAS, PCU, ESEA, TBV, UUU, and PED, and see which one trounces expectations first. I think it will be ACAS, but PCU is awfully tempting too. Anyway, the parallel with the tech crash is good, as long as you realize that 2001 really was an opportunity - just not for most tech stocks. Likewise, 2008 is an opportunity except for most homebuilders, subprime lenders, mortgage insurers, Citi, and the like.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
As much as I believe that the worst is yet to come, the world markets and China especially, our market will be OK this year. Not fantastic, but OK. I am saying this because this being election year and whoemever is in the office will make sure that economy is sound. That being said, if Democrats get elected then they have emphasis on domestic agendas, this include economy. If Republicans come then still there will be enough stimalus to keep it going. My 2 cents (if I can bank it I would be quite wealthy :)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Bear, re: your thoughts on shorting optimism - i was just thinking myself today that Pro Shares ought to introduce an UltraShort Planet Earth ETF.  that'd be really helpful as i rebalance.  does that make me a bear too?   ;)  
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

There is quite a bit of information about the actual and illusionary preventive measures taken months and weeks prior to the market crash of 1929.  There are numerous reflections written on every aspect of  each economic downfall the world has experienced.  I try to heed the lessons of the past, but, unfortunately, this historic economic disaster is sailing within extremely harmful unchartered waters.  I will play and gamble with shorts, but the next year will bring global bankruptcy and cause money to be a useless piece of paper. 

    

    

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

This is a bear market rally and will probably reverse sometime next week.

The banks have more big losses coming after some credit insurers have been downgraded, and I don't think all of this has been priced into the stock market.  And I don't believe for a minute that the downgrades are over.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
in response to FourthAxis; day tading is best left to the "professionals" who sit by the phones in NY. investors like us who buy and sell thru scottrade or the like - our best bet is to buy fundamentally sound stocks when they are cheap (i.e. now) and hold them for 3-5 years or more. even if these stocks do drop a bit more than from when you buy them, you are still getting them at a deal, and if given long enough, they will rebound and meet or beat what you put into them. the stock market always goes back up. patience IS key. sounds to me like you lost some money in the markets recently. i wonder if you will be feeling the same way about AAPL in 5 years?? i bet not. $120 something a share will be a steal. good luck with your bleak, short-term point of view.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Mr. SpecBear,

 I agree with the poor forecast for the US market. I also started at 2001, only to came back at 2006, but with far worst intelligence as you, judging by numbers.

   Nevertheless I want to share with you my thougts on the global economy. I just wrote about VWO (Vanguard's Emerging Marktes ETF).

   Basically, as Alvin Tofler said it, there are three waves, Gave one is agro and produces U$S:12000 per year per person. Wave two is industry and produces U$S:80000 per year per person, and wave three is knowledge and produces U$S:300000 per year per person.

   As I see it, USA, Europe and Japan have lots of people in the thrid wave, while third world countries have most of their population in the first and seond wave. The problem is that it hasn't yeat appear (to my knowledge) a fourth wave that can help the first world to keep growing, but for "emerging markets" they still have lot of people to move from the first and second to the third wave, thus outgrowing by far the first world.

   I really expect this trend to continue for 10 or more years, that's why I really thing VWO is a top choice for someone like me (32 years old) that want to invest thinking on a 20 years scope.

   So don't be pessimistic, just invest in emerging markets, sure they are more volatile, but in the long run the will outperform all other markets... at least this is how I see it...

 

 My two cents. 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Honestly, these markets just plain confuse me along with all the so called experts dishing out advice.  

Its just so damn volatile.  Huge swings to the upside and down with little to no reason.  Days you have bad news the markets go up?!  Days when companies report good earnings their stock price goes down!?  Even the FED is giving out mixed signals!

 I had wanted to buy SRS for a long time.  I noticed Specbear bought a little while back at 104 but today SRS looks to be head lower.  IF FED cuts tomorrow it may bottom out - strange, just a few months ago there was a story here on fool.com that stated SRS was a stock even critics liked... 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Honestly, these markets just plain confuse me along with all the so called experts dishing out advice.  

Its just so damn volatile.  Huge swings to the upside and down with little to no reason.  Days you have bad news the markets go up?!  Days when companies report good earnings their stock price goes down!?  Even the FED is giving out mixed signals!

 I had wanted to buy SRS for a long time.  I noticed Specbear bought a little while back at 104 but today SRS looks to be head lower.  IF FED cuts tomorrow it may bottom out - strange, just a few months ago there was a story here on fool.com that stated SRS was a stock even critics liked... 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

What part of "averages 8-10% annual return" don't you people understand?

 If you can't make 10% a year in the stock market, why not get out?  Buy an ETF that tracks the S&P and you'll never have think again in your life, and you're basically promised 10% if you stay in for 10 years or longer.

 Me, personally - I'm taking this opportunity to buy large company stocks with Forward P/E's of about 10.  They might go down 20% before they hit the bottom (and that's okay too because that means I can buy even more!) but eventually they are going to get to around 15 at least, and that means 50% gain (nevermind that the company is growing!).

 Everyone who thinks WFC is a sell at this point - send me your email address and I'll mail you an e-card next year when the company is making more than it was last year, and the stock is 30% higher than it is today.

 Guaranteed money in the bank.  (and it pays better than a T-bill!)

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

I've been fully invested through the crash of 1987, the downturn 1998 and 2001-2003 and the key thing is to do nothing-if you've already been invested for a long time.  Which is what I did in each case.  I was lucky in that I had made the majority of my purchases over a long period of time in companies like Merke, Intel, Walmart, McDonolds, Pepsi etc.  Companies with dividends that had been in existence nearly forever.  If you look at the behavior of any of these major companies from 1990-2008, the gyrations hardly matter.

 That said, I now have over 2/3 of my investments funds in cash because I believe the problem of overleveraged debt is so enormous it will take years to unwind.  I agree with Jim Rodgers that only commodities, energy and agricultural stocks are worth owning since their earnings and cash flow are very predictible (unless people stop eating, driving and heating their houses).  Which might happen!  Then I recommend investing in guns and ammo.  This is the ultimate security measure for the U.S.

 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I keep reading folks that talk about timing the "market" . . . YOU CAN'T DO IT!  In the short term the "market" is a random walk, so how do you hope to time it.  Do your due diligence, buy quality companies (not gambles), balance with some good dividend stocks, periodically review, and change holdings when you no longer believe what you hold is a buy.  Long term investing is boring, but profitable. 
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I am a bear myself. I just started getting into investing over the last 3 or 4 months. Suffice it to say that I am cautious because I am new, but I have also been learning about the FED and how it actually works, and about gold. I am toying with the market with a few hundred dollars to get a feel for it, but will not invest heavily for a little while. I think this is going to be a serious recession.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Some of the best advice I've seen anywhere up to now I saw only a few weeks ago, and it ties into the analogy you give for catching a falling knife.  It goes like this:  When taking long positions, only invest in stocks that are rising and are undervalued.  When they are rising it shows they are allready moving in the direction you want them to and have momentum to continue.  If a stock is going down, who is to say where the bottom is.  Plus it will have its momentum to the down side.  In a nutshell, don't try to catch falling knives, you'll probalby get hurt and regret it.  Mainly advice for the long term investor, not a day trader who can't hold a stock longer than it takes to say "hi".
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Some of the best advice I've seen is in the book, "The Warren Buffett" way.  He would say waiting to buy a company until it is already going up is stupid.  Who would want to buy a company for a higher price if you could have had it for a lower price? 

When you are looking at a company currently at $30, who would really say "I like this company but I want it at $33"?  If you think it is a good buy at $30 and you want to hold it long, who cares if it goes down first - you still have the same company you had before, it's not like your shares actually decreased if you're still waiting for whatever the price will be at the end of FY2009 or 2010.

If you buy a great company for a good price and it goes down more, you now have an opportunity to buy a great company at a great price.  2007 was the only year momentum "investors" did better than value investors since the tech bubble (and we all know how that turned out when it ended) so it isn't exactly a winning strategy.  Check out Warren Buffett.  I'd call that a winning strategy.

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
that is the longest blog ever
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
The same thing happened to me except I had to portfolios. One was me picking and trading stocks the other was Vanguard basic SP 500 index. The result, I lost most of the money in the market and left the SP 500 index alone. After all those years I have all my money in that fund and a profit of $74k. Started with a flat 100K and left it. Perhaps there is something to be said about simple investing afterall.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Investing is a long term project, while trading stocks short term is more like gambling.  Historically, the majority of the big gains happen on a few days and if your on the sidelines waiting for the market bottom your portfolio will underperform. 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Lol, I bought my first shares ever, Apple at $178.00, pressed the buy button and watched as it dropped $50.00, I never had a minute to enjoy it going up, it went down down down,  I bought more at $132.00.  I want to buy more but am waiting, I am not sure how much further it can go.  $85.00 is the low of the year.  I love the iphone, amazing gadget, Best computer I have ever seen.  Learning here and your comments are helpful.  Thanks
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Guys, I truly believe we are soon going to see the start of a major bull market in US equities.

The fed have devalued the dollar and put the sale sign up. foreign investment is pouring in (myself included).

Lets face it, where is all that sovereign cash and retirement money going to go? real estate? I dont think so, its going to flood into Microsoft, Coke, Disney, Citi and all the other US icons.Especially when China starts to stumble on inflation and social unrest develops.

Dont worry about all the debt, inflation will take care of that. No majoy financial institutions of bond insurers will fail, the fed will see to that, after all it is an election year!

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Some sectors are still looking good.

 Energy/oil/mining  as well as the engineering companies that supplly them.  ie fluor (flr) foster wheeler (fwlt) chicago bridge and iron (cbi)

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

SpecBear,

 I'm as green as they come.  No not the dollars I've been losing, I mean in stock evaluating experience.  I was told about TMF by another enlisted man while I was at the NCO academy in Colorado.  I've read most of the school section on here and thought I'd get the hang of things.  Well a week into the CAPS section and I'm beaten by nearly everyone.  I've yet to red the power of the red thumb as well.  Any chance others on here help us newbies learn without going through the school of hard knocks?  Basically I've given up on other types of money managers as my real world portfolios are down 18%, including my Roth IRA.  Granted much of that is attributed to the realestate and financial sector purchase a couple years ago.  Any honest guidance to help me better evaluate long term investment choices would be appreciated.  I've always been interested in the stock market and economy.  I'm just now getting the time to learn.  Thanks from a USAF guy serving in Baghdad, Iraq. 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

someone please check out and opinion AQUA (Aquacell).  I like the inventors solar powered air conditioner. 

http://www.solarschoolhouse.org/solareclips/2005.08/20050809-4.html

Pruitt sold his patent to Aquacell I believe.  I know he is working there at this moment.  Might be a partnership with him.  They will be changing their name to something like Greencore soon they tell me.  Apparently they have put one into an India Company recently. 

Moneycentral comes up with the info of this pink sheet company under AQUA

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
SEE my blog after this one I think it will explain some of this and pass it on if you want.
BANKRUPT by 2057. Now with the CENTRAL BANK 'S more Debt is it now 2020 we will be BANKRUPT?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I was 5 when I saw JFK shot.  THIS IS WHERE WE ARE    THIS IS WHAT IS HAPPENING AROUND THE WORLD SANCTION BY ALL GOVERNMENTS THAT INCLUDES ME and will I change? REAL CHANGE ?   /param>                                          AND ALL BUT ONE WAS KILLED                    THE UNITED STATES OF THE WORLD BANK?????? OR THE UNITED STATES OF AMERCIA!!!!!!!!    IN GOD( WHO HAS 76 NAMES ) WE TRUST. IS THIS THE END For US?  Will the World GOVERNMENTS  control or will  WE THE PEOPLE?  I will do as Mother Theresa,Gandi,Mendella did with peace and my vote.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

"Thank heaven for whisky, cigs, and lolcats."

 

hilarious

 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
G-7 Says Outlook `Weakened,' Warns on Currency Swings (Update3)

By Simon Kennedy

April 11 (Bloomberg) -- Finance chiefs from the Group of Seven nations said the global economic slowdown may worsen amid an ``entrenched'' credit squeeze and signaled concern over the dollar's slide.

``Since our last meeting, there have been at times sharp fluctuations in major currencies, and we are concerned about their possible implications for economic and financial stability,'' the G-7's finance ministers and central bankers said in a statement after talks in Washington today.

The officials downgraded their outlook for the world economy from that of two months ago, blaming the U.S. housing recession, credit-market turmoil, commodity prices and inflation pressures. The dollar has lost 8 percent against the euro and 6 percent versus the yen since the G-7 last met in Tokyo in February.

``They're trying to discreetly throw a lifeline to the dollar,'' said Sophia Drossos, a currency strategist at Morgan Stanley in New York, who used to help manage the Federal Reserve's foreign-exchange holdings. ``Had they not said anything, the dollar would have resumed its sell-off. This acknowledges there has been increased volatility.''

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
specbear! post another blog dammit!  i see you adding picks and stuff.  let's keep a dialogue eh?  you are kicking ass right now so keep it up let's have some fun with it.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
hey not bad for the 2nd inning is it.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

congrats on 10k specbear!  First to get there and well-deserved.

Now post another blog dammit!

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Congratulations on regaining first place, spectacled one. Now if you could please comply with our collective wishes for a new blog it would be appreciated. Personally, I like mineral and natural resource plays at the moment, but don't feel I'm alone in being a bit confused and frightened by the current environment.

Thanks, B

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

Kudos to you and to anyone fortunate enough to read this. 

Yeah, I was in that boat to burned in '00-'01 but oh how the tides have turned...

even after nonstop, market obsession since then and picking up an econ degree at top honors during the time passed, all my reading/knowledge/curriculum didn't teach me the most crucial & relevant facts about our world which you can now fortunately learn in mere minutes:

A simple 10 minutes to understand our world today & whats happening:

www.fedupusa.org/

.....

there, do things make a bit more sense?

Here's a voice from Feb 2008 ( too bad i didnt get word then):

http://wallstreetexaminer.com/?p=2280

.......................

did you read it?

surprised?

Well... as you may understand from past experience, assets can go up forever or down forever and if you dont know if the faucet is on or off, then you'll be BURNED in the process (no matter the fundamentals or the "soundness" of the investment). Common sense will be ignored until we destroy the single faucet system & have competing backed-currency issuance & effective transparency over the nominal/credit expansion/contraction of our currency (for a change).

WOW, almost impossible to imagine as that would tackle major world issues AND restore prosperity to well deserved hard working citizens.  

.....

Talk, communicate, email these ideas with coworkers, friends, family, educate the young, spread the knowledge & power!!!!

 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
hello! my username is southwestjack. I am a self-taught investor. I have done ok, but now I am in a conundrum,lol. I tried to creat a portfolio of stocks that would do well in an economic down turn. I have things like PWE, POT, CALM. I also have 2 funds in latin american stocks. I have some C, but I trade that up and down with the market. I have a few hundred shares that I trade, selling at about 18.50 or so, and buying again at under 17.00. Its fun and puts from 300 to 800 a month in my account. My problem is i am insecure about guessing which way the market is going. Any thoughts on this? 
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0

 

What happens to you or me if we were to manipulate the stock market??

Who's bailing out the american public when the crooks (GS, LEH, ML, AIG, etc.) shorted our call positions and sucked the bankroll into their fat-cat pockets?

What happened to the 'FREE' in Free Market?

Who's on watch!?

They all deserve to reap what they have sown!!!

 

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
SpecBear,

You first caught my attention with your blog post talking about the risks of getting in too early in our current downtrend vs. the lost reward of getting in too late even against Buffett’s recommendation.  It made a lot of sense to me.  Following this I noticed that you were in the Fool top 5 members and have since risen to #2.  Now I come across this posting and I feel a need to know more.  You obviously hit the nail on the head here clear back in January but it's not immediately clear from your posting what led you to this conclusion.  If your standing in the Fool community is based on more than just some lucky pessimism at the right time then the answer to this question could be very valuable to many of us.  Can you expand on the reasons for your warranted pessimism?

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
we have bad news after bad news after bad news and the dow is still around 8500, ill mortgage the house to buy under 8K again, the news is shittier everyday and the market is still holding ground, when we get more bulls than bears watch out, the joys of a short squeeze are almost upon us, BUY THE F'IN MARKET
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
i can haz bailout package, but i no want. Halp! Teh market iz no cheezburger.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I could not agree more with your pessimistic view. I have followed your stock picks, or should I say stock shorts with much admiration! The Economy and our government as I see it "We are a nation of consumers", have you heard this line before? It is so true that it is scary! We buy Chinese and other foreign goods for almost nothing, but at what cost? Wal Mart and Best Buy are a couple of companies that have capitalized on this trend. As with any trend we should have put a stop to this many years ago. Buying American made goods would greatly help our economy. This would be a great idea if there were many products still made here. Want proof? go to the stores above and look for the "Made in USA" tag. Many Americans use the excuse that foreign products such as Toyota are higher quality. They are higher quality because our own automakers have stymied change by spending money on lobbyists, corporate jets, and insanely high CEO pay. This pay should have been tied to performance. The CEOs and millionaire board members did this instead of making the necessary changes and investments to secure their and our future. Once again the elite have been greedy and everyone will pay. Trickle down economics? This means we all we be pissed on a few drops at a time until we all stink like urine. Manufacturing jobs have been steadily lost to other countries for years with nothing being done to address the problem. Our government and the lobbyists for the corporations that pay our Senators and Congressmen allowed this too happen. They can make a better profit by using the cheap labor of people living in cardboard boxes. The demise of Lehman Brothers and the decline of Citi, Morgan Stanley, and Bank of America have been shocking. Think about the loss of high paying jobs in this sector! Along with this has come a steady wave of layoffs at banks and mortgage lenders across the country. All of this equates to everyone being scared of losing their job and our consumerism has come to a screeching halt. Who is left supporting a big part of our economy? People that have retired from companies that will soon file for bankruptcy. I will give the government credit for seeing the problem with the "Big Three" going out of business, but you can not plug the hole in the dam with a piece of chewing gum. Will change happen under Obama? Most of our Senators and Congressmen are as greedy and inept as the CEOs were at Enron and Worldcom. Why are we going to be the last country to make changes that others have made such as running the entire country with renewable power? Because again our Corporations have lobbyied against change that would cost them money with no regard for the environment or the future. Most should be locked up with Ebbers and Schilling. Healthcare in America? As our tax base dwindles and Medicaid and Medicare are ripped off by corrupt companies the whole sector will be swallowed up in a black hole just like everything else. Social Security? As even less people are working the funds will dry up even quicker than originally projected. It has been too many years of the same thing over and over, and our future has already been stolen by the corrupt politicians and companies that have been nearsighted. There are some bright spots in our economy, as the price of everything continues to spiral downward money will be spent again and we temporarily will rejoice and say the recovery is under way! Many will go out and buy more Chinese made goods, and if you invest in the right foreign countries you may actually have enough to retire by the time you are 75 or 80.
Print the post Back To Top