No. of Recommendations: 0
No doubt this trend was spurred along by the economic devastation of the Chickenhawk Years of Bush & Cheney

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2716297/Have-house-t...

intercst
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I thought this was a post about the housing industry coming to its senses and building homes young couples can actually afford.

Guess I'll wait for that one.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Sure it was.

http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/products/cypress

Imagine spending $383 per square foot, or half that if you DIY.

Have you ordered a 200 square foot house for your family yet?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
To be affordable, it becomes a combination of income and location. When I see young people looking for starter homes, and hear their demands for stainless and upgraded cabinets and floors, I wonder what they'll end up in. One thing young couples never discuss is the carrying costs.

It's quite a shocker when people have been taught to look at the purchase prices and monthly mortgage, but forget about utilities, property taxes, HOA fees if they apply.

They should watch some HGTV and learn about expanding your search area.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
They should watch some HGTV and learn about expanding your search area.

I used to watch HGTV's "House Hunters" regularly, but have backed off considerably because of young couples buying their first home on a budget of $150,000 in, say Atlanta. They routinely expect all rooms to be large and open with hardwood floors, and all appliances, cabinets, and fixtures to be upgraded. Only once have I heard a Realtor tell a couple, "In your price point, you have to understand you can't have everything new." Maybe they say it off-camera.

Chili
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Chili, I see just the opposite. I may have the names wrong, but there are some shows like "Househunters" or "My First Place" where you see young couples - he's a tattoo artist, she works in a bakery - shopping for homes, but confessing "we only have $600K to spend".

The only reasonable show is one set in Waco, TX where the agents help the customer buy and renovate an older or rundown home. They buy in the price range of about $80K to $200K then fix it up.

HGTV seems to go in waves/fads -- French Country, Tuscan, celebrity restoration (star buys & rehabs homes), "buy and renovate" (Property Brothers & the like), now it's "tiny house". [DW is addicted to HGTV; my knowledge of it is collateral damage.]

The one show I do like is Rehab Addict. They take on major projects in older homes, explain what they're doing and why, and the star/host gets in there and does the work herself (not just pointing to contractors and flitting around like some other diy shows).
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
HGTV is the only place where you can put money into some renovations, and Always turn a profit by increasing resale value. Of course, a large chunk of their "renovations" usually end up being massive repairs to electrical, plumbing, code violations and the like. That's because they fail to properly inspect the house before making their wild assumptions. Although the original estimate of a home's worth never includes the repairs required, they still end up with a house worth dramatically more.

And yes, I do know that the shows are scripted and that the decisions were made long before the show taped. Love it or List it is a prime offender on both counts.

Many variables go into the value of renovations and upgrades. I've looked at a place that I know needs a roof in 5 years, and a new AC unit. That's why it's priced the way it is. But my sig other can't get around the fact that that the fridge is 10 years old and it's not a brand new house. I've priced the renos, and it's about half the cost of the difference between that house, and another that's newer and needs no renos, but also is minus one key room.

On another note, it's humorous to see the HGTV shows where a 2,000 SF home that's older is listed at $750,000, below their budget ;)

I just know they're usually looking north of the border.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Imagine spending $383 per square foot, or half that if you DIY.

Have you ordered a 200 square foot house for your family yet?


What about something like this:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Best-Barns-Arlington-12-ft-x-24-f...

If you just want tiny and have a limited budget, it could be customized and brought up to code for a fraction of that price.

Personally, I want a Barndo. Once DH and I have DS out of the house, we're buying land and having one installed.

LWW
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Chili, I see just the opposite. I may have the names wrong, but there are some shows like "Househunters" or "My First Place" where you see young couples - he's a tattoo artist, she works in a bakery - shopping for homes, but confessing "we only have $600K to spend".

Yes, BG, I see this, as well, and it is also jaw-dropping and annoying and is, IMO, a whole 'nuther ball of wax. They may be in for a serious financial wedgie. Don't know why the kids with small budget and huge expectations just annoy the daylights out of me.

The only reasonable show is one set in Waco, TX where the agents help the customer buy and renovate an older or rundown home. They buy in the price range of about $80K to $200K then fix it up.

Fixer Upper is the name. Chip and Joanna Gaines host. Yes, I'm a fan. Almost makes me want to move to Waco to take advantage of such incredible prices. My mother's family originally settled in that vicinity, but I can't imagine actually moving to the land of Baptist nutjobs.

The one show I do like is Rehab Addict.

Nicole Curtis is the host and it's filmed in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area. I love watching her go into salvage stores to find things and have learned a number of things from her.

Chili
HGTV lover
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Love it or List it is a prime offender on both counts.

Cannot watch this show at all. Homeowners AND hosts are annoying beyond words.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
I think these little houses would be great for just ONE person. I can't imagine living with someone else in one of them. Absolutely no privacy. That would drive me mad in short order.

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1

I used to watch HGTV's "House Hunters" regularly, but have backed off considerably because of young couples buying their first home on a budget of $150,000 in, say Atlanta. They routinely expect all rooms to be large and open with hardwood floors, and all appliances, cabinets, and fixtures to be upgraded. Only once have I heard a Realtor tell a couple, "In your price point, you have to understand you can't have everything new." Maybe they say it off-camera.

Chili




I still watch it periodically. I do a lot of eye-rolling, though.
I wish I had a nickel for every time someone said the phrase, "I can see myself...." (in this room / in this yard / on this deck / in that tub / cooking in that kitchen / whatever )

I also do a lot of eye-rolling at people choosing a house based on the most frivolous of things - like whether or not it has ceiling fans. For the love of FSM! You can add ceiling fans or take them out at will!

Then there are the people that just can't be pleased no matter what. Or the ones where one of the couple wants modern and the other wants traditional.

People just sort of amaze and puzzle me. Some want the kids rooms right next to their own room. Privacy, I guess, is not an issue. Maybe they don't plan to ever have sex again once the kids are big enough to hear them. :)

Or some little twitlet just has to have the washer and dryer upstairs - or downstairs - or anywhere other than where they currently are.

And all the hoopla over double sinks in the bathroom just cracks me up. If you have double sinks you lose tons of counter space. I want that space. Let hubby get his own bathroom. ;o)

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Love it or List it is a prime offender on both counts.

Cannot watch this show at all. Homeowners AND hosts are annoying beyond words.




Whoa! I thought I was the only one who thought that.
They just annoy the crap out of me arguing with each other.
And the couples (homeowners)! Gah! You just want to shake them till their teeth rattle. :)

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Nearly every show on TV is 'scripted'...

From American Pickers to all the House Hunting shows......and fixer uppers....

Even PBS This Old House series was well scripted.....but at least you got the inside view....and no punches pulled when problems arose....but of course, giant budgets and giant contributions to even offset the giant budgets.

Every 'reality' show is scripted. Did you really think that Survivor anywhere was nothing but TV engineered 'eyeball time'?

You realize the business model of TV is 'attracting eyeballs' to 'watch ADS' that are sold to 'advertisers' for large quantities of money while minimizing expenditures on 'programming' and TV stars.

You get shows like COPS...no 'stars' in them....some cash to the departments involved for the 'time'......but even they are somewhat scripted and controlled and very edited..... or Alaska State Troopers...or Bering Sea Gold....and similar..

Remember, the main purpose of TV is to get you to watch the ads. Programming is just something they have to come up with to get you to watch the ads. the programming is filler between the advertising time.

OOps. Judge Judy coming up in 45 minutes...time to think about making the big lunch salad....that takes 20 minutes.....but it's probably a re run....




t.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Remember, the main purpose of TV is to get you to watch the ads.

The beauty of DVRs is no need to watch ads.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Oh! I forgot to mention that one of the things I learned while watching "House Hunters International" is that Australians raise their voice a note on the last word of nearly every sentence. It was so weird once I realized it that I just couldn't stop waiting for that rising inflection.

"And here we have the living ROOM"
"Here's your bath TUB"
"Let's go through to the bedROOM"

It was so annoying that it became laughable.
Every. Single. Sentence.

Another Australian on another of the shows kept saying the word "here" in the most annoying way possible. I can't even begin to spell the noise that came out in place of the word. But it was something like "hyaah" being pushed through the nose with an "n" sound to the whole word.

People are weird. :)

AM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Remember, the main purpose of TV is to get you to watch the ads.

The beauty of DVRs is no need to watch ads.


Eventually those two ideas are going to cause a massive game-changing conflict.

Companies will one day tire of ponying up for commercial time knowing that their ad is unwatched by DVR zippers. They'll take their advertising budget elsewhere. Notice the proliferation of ads played in theaters before the movie starts? You can't fast-forward those.

Already TV studios are offering 'exclusive content' on their websites. I can see studios offering multiple tiers of access. So imagine watching a stripped-down 30-minute episode of, say, Hell on Wheels, along with your standard 8 minutes of commercials, which zippers will fast-forward past. Or, you can watch the full one-hour episode online, expanding the plot line and making the episode more enjoyable, but without the ability to zip past commercials.

Or perhaps they'll put the expanded episodes on a pay-per-view channel, but commercial-free.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<<Remember, the main purpose of TV is to get you to watch the ads.>>


<<OOps. Judge Judy coming up in 45 minutes...>>


Heh, heh!



Too bad Reagan didn't nominate Judge Judy for the Supreme Court...



Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I also do a lot of eye-rolling at people choosing a house based on the most frivolous of things - like whether or not it has ceiling fans. For the love of FSM! You can add ceiling fans or take them out at will!

Then there are the people that just can't be pleased no matter what. Or the ones where one of the couple wants modern and the other wants traditional.

People just sort of amaze and puzzle me. Some want the kids rooms right next to their own room. Privacy, I guess, is not an issue. Maybe they don't plan to ever have sex again once the kids are big enough to hear them. :)

Or some little twitlet just has to have the washer and dryer upstairs - or downstairs - or anywhere other than where they currently are.

And all the hoopla over double sinks in the bathroom just cracks me up. If you have double sinks you lose tons of counter space. I want that space. Let hubby get his own bathroom. ;o)
__________________

It's scripted to create dram for 39 minutes. 60 minutes less 21 for commercials. It's an act.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
<<I also do a lot of eye-rolling at people choosing a house based on the most frivolous of things - like whether or not it has ceiling fans. For the love of FSM! You can add ceiling fans or take them out at will!
>>


American consumer society has following fads and fashions at its core. There tends to be a lot of that in liberal politics, too, in my experience.



Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Chili: "Nicole Curtis is the host and it's filmed in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area. I love watching her go into salvage stores to find things and have learned a number of things from her."

I watch Nicole Curtis for other reasons.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
LWW: "Personally, I want a Barndo."

If I may ask, what leads you in that direction?

I had to look up the term since I'd not heard of it before, but it seems like it's a metal shell. You need to put in a floor, insulation, plumbing, etc. It's almost as if you just bought a shelter so a house can be put inside it.

But like I said, this is my only acquaintance with it so I may be 100% wrong.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I had to look up the term since I'd not heard of it before, but it seems like it's a metal shell. You need to put in a floor, insulation, plumbing, etc. It's almost as if you just bought a shelter so a house can be put inside it.

But like I said, this is my only acquaintance with it so I may be 100% wrong.


We've had several friends who put them up. The main reason is we plan on buying several acres in a rural area and they can be built pretty quickly and to our preferred specs.

http://texasbarnbuilder.com/texas-barndominium-builder.html

I'd like to have one that looks like the picture at the top of the page.

LWW
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
American consumer society has following fads and fashions at its core. There tends to be a lot of that in liberal politics, too, in my experience.
SP


I guess the Tea Party is neither fad nor fashion. Or Bomb-Bomb-Iran. Or flag lapel pins. Or "Country First" as a cover for all sorts of mischief. Not to mention "War on Christmas." I guess being anti-gay is a dying fad, but being anti-choice is a rising one. Oh, those faddish, waggish conservatives!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 6
American consumer society has following fads and fashions at its core. There tends to be a lot of that in liberal politics, too, in my experience.

Perhaps, but fads in liberal politics tend to become mainstream politics. Fads on conservative politics tend to be viewed as on "the wrong side of history."

As evidence, I enter in worker protection laws, equal rights for blacks, equal rights for women, the minimum wage, Social Security, Medicare, and now equal rights for gays and the ACA.

All of those things were originally opposed by conservatives, and none of them will be rolled back. Maybe some quibbling around the edges, but as whole, no.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<<
As evidence, I enter in worker protection laws, equal rights for blacks, equal rights for women, the minimum wage, Social Security, Medicare, and now equal rights for gays and the ACA.

All of those things were originally opposed by conservatives, and none of them will be rolled back. Maybe some quibbling around the edges, but as whole, no.


>>



A hundred years ago socialists and anarchists expected the imminent destruction of capitalism. Instead, it is socialism that has been destroyed in its Communist variants.

The one big goal of the left 0--- still not achieved.

"We will bury you!" Heh, heh!



Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top