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We have never owned a house with a pool before and are seriously considering one with an inground pool. Vinyl liner at the end of it's age and a local pool co gave us a range of $3000-4500 to replace. Trying to get a handle on just how much of a PITA having a pool is, and how much money we can expect to flush down the filter every year. Also wondering if anyone has an idea of how much it would take to convert the pool from chlorine to salt. Does that require different systems, like the filter, heater or circulator? Clearly we are newbies on this, but I do believe the pool, which we did not set out searching for, would be an asset in this case.

TIA,
IP

hoping all you pool owners are enjoying this heat
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Salt water is way more corrosive than chlorine. Unless you know otherwise, you should assume all metal parts of water circulation system will need to be replaced - pumps, heaters, tanks, pipes, valves. The 55+ community we live in has two pools - one salt and one chlorine. Both will built at the same time about 7 years ago. In the last 18 months (since we moved in) there has been exactly zero issues with the outdoor chlorine pool. The temporary short closures of the indoor salt pool have average once every 6 weeks or so. I suspect the equipment is nearing end of life and will need replacement - but I don't know or care. (I don't use the pool.)

I suggest you put this to your real estate agent. Have them find a couple of people with salt water pools and ask those people. Real Estate agents can look at databases of old sales. Certainly pools will be lists and I expect if the pool is saltwater, that would appear in a notes/comment section.

Be sure to speak with local pool people who have multiple salt water pools.
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I have a 15k gallon in ground pool - plaster, not vinyl. I do prefer plaster to vinyl - more durable surface. I converted mine to salt about two years ago, and would do it again in a heartbeat. I kept my same filter (no heater here), but installed a new variable speed pump at the same time. The pump has to be circulating water to make chlorine, and a variable speed lets you run at a low speed to save on electricity costs. Between the pump and saltwater chlorine generator it was about $1600 for the new equipment, salt was maybe $50 (my pool had about 2/3 of the necessary salt from years of chlorine dosing). Probably another $50-$100 in PVC, valves, fittings to DIY re-plumb my equipment pad.

Salt levels for pools really aren't terribly salty - perhaps 10% of the salt content of seawater. I haven't noticed any real differences as far as corrosion, or had any issues to speak of. The saltwater chlorine generator tends to push your pH upwards a little, which means you'll probably add acid more regularly. But that's pretty minor, I end up dosing 15-20 oz of acid every few weeks.

Here's how I look at the cost. The chlorine generator was just under $1k, and the cell should last 4-5 years if the pool is properly maintained. I'll probably save $200/yr that I was spending on liquid chlorine. A replacement cell will run $400-$500, and get me another 4-5 years. Even with the cost being near a wash, the convenience is well worth it. No more regular trips to the pool store, lugging 2.5g jugs of chlorine, no more chlorine splashes on clothing.
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Be sure to speak with local pool people who have multiple salt water pools

Waiting for the pool cos to open at 9AM to call, but looking for feedback from owners as well. Would really like to know how much of a PITA owners feel their pools are, as well as cost issues. Since we were chemist/chemE, I would think water testing would not be beyond our skills, but we also wish to travel. Would our pool own us? Would we need to have a pool person to maintain the pool while we were gone? Is it like owning a boat...great idea in theory but a complete money pit?

We are retired and would use the pool for exercise. The season is mid April-mid October as it is a heated pool.

IP
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we also wish to travel. Would our pool own us? Would we need to have a pool person to maintain the pool while we were gone? Is it like owning a boat...great idea in theory but a complete money pit?
I haven't hired a pool person yet, and we also like to travel. Chlorine dosing is the most important thing, and a saltwater system automates that for you. Spent 16 days in Europe last summer and came home to perfect blue water. The chlorine is on autopilot. I also have a suction-side cleaner that runs when the pump is on high - which it's programmed to be for an hour or two each day. With no leafy trees in the backyard (we're tropical, so it's all palm trees), I find our pool is pretty easy to maintain.
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Very helpful Jeff, thanks. Beyond the cost I confess I much prefer swimming in salt pools over chlorine.

How much time do you find you spend maintaining your pool?

IP
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How much time do you find you spend maintaining your pool?

My style is like Warren Buffet's investment style - lethargy bordering on sloth.

I have a cartridge filter, which means it typically needs me to pull the cartridge and spray it with the garden hose every couple of weeks. That's a 10 minute job. If I don't do this, as the filter clogs, flow is reduced, and my suction cleaner doesn't move around. It's a remarkably effective indicator when it's time to clean the filter.

I test the water once in a blue moon - great test kit from tftestkits.net Chlorine and pH are the ones to check most often, but once you have a feel for your pool and everything dialed in you really don't do it very often. I might check calcium and alkalinity twice year. pH and chlorine once a month, maybe a little more. CYA (stabilizer) once or twice a year.

The more regular stuff - clean the skimmer baskets once a week or so. I tend to net the pool any time I'm getting in. Brushing the walls is more physical, and something you probably need to do once or twice a week during the hot months. Keeps algae from growing a film on the sides (even with proper chlorine levels). I don't do this quite as often as I should. Again, it's a 10 minute job, but varies depending on the size of the pool. Mine is a typical 15x30', about 6 feet deep.
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Strongly recommend looking into Bioguard salt offering-- particularly their 'mineral springs' line.

It will be a little more money initially, but will help to protect the equipment over time.

(I used to work in the industry, a lifetime ago)
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Would we need to have a pool person to maintain the pool while we were gone?

I would. Our pool experience was pretty bad, since we didn't live right there, it was older, in a wooded area, etc. One thing I learned quick--thousands of gallons of water can turn bad faster than you think, even with checking it every couple of days. If you had a really good cover and really good advice on leaving the pool for a week or so (chemical treatments,etc.), maybe you could get away with DIY, but I'd rather pay a professional to come out 1-2 times to check than come home after a week to green cloudy water.

cm,
still twitches when walking past the Costco pool chlorine area
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I have a 20k gallon pool with a salt system on it. I had it built about 11-12 years ago. It is a salt water pool. It has a vinyl liner. Around age 9, I had to replace the liner. It was about $4500. I replaced the pool pump a year ago with a variable speed pump for the lower cost of operation.

https://poolstoponline.com/Service-or-Repair/Pool-School-Und...

The salt levels in the pool are usually between 2800 to 3200 ppm. I never have to add salt unless there has been a lot of rain. I have a sand filter and heat pump on my system. The maintenance on the system isn't that bad. I throw the Polaris pool cleaner in the pool once a week to vacuum. You can test the water yourself or take it to a pool supply place for testing if they are not far away. I prefer a Taylor testing kit over test strips because it uses liquid reagents which I feel are more accurate.

Generally, I only need to add cyanuric acid, a chlorine stabilizer, in the spring when I open the pool. Sometimes the pool can go a month without any needed chemicals but if there is one outside of normal range, it is the pH which gets too high so you need to add some acid to lower it. I would have no concern traveling for several weeks.

I never have to brush the sides of the pool for algae. In the 12 years, I've only had one algae bloom in the pool and I attribute that to getting some soap in the pool when I powerwashed the concrete around the pool. The phosphates were way off the chart and it took several bottles of phosphate reducer to get the levels back down. Over the years I have had to replace the heat pump, salt cell, circuit board to salt system, and pool pump. I also needed to replace the anchors in the concrete to my hand rails and ladder because the original ones corroded because they were metal. Today they install plastic ones.

Due to my wife's arthritis, the pool is the main source of exercise for her during the spring, summer, and fall. She swims one hundred laps every morning. The pool is 17'x37'.

Since I know you like to do extensive research, visit Trouble Free Pool where they have sections on Pool School, PoolMath and forum.
https://www.troublefreepool.com/blog/

I cannot say how much the pool costs me. The main costs are the electricity cost for the heat pump in spring and fall and the pump during the pool season. It's hard to isolate that cost from the cost increase for the AC in the house during the same time period.

PSU
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Trying to get a handle on just how much of a PITA having a pool is,...

Depends who you ask. I found it to be a major PITA. You need to check the chemistry every few days (unless you like algae). As you live someplace colder it may be slightly less frequently. In Phoenix evaporation is significant, so you need to stay on top of it.

You need to keep it clean (skimming, sweeping, AND the filters). Besides making for nasty water, it can damage the equipment ($$$$). Here in Phoenix it's a lot of dust/dirt that blows in. Back east where you are it may be more bugs, leaves, cottonwood puffs, or whatever.

The pump equipment is an energy hog.

Since I had one they have more strict laws about safety (e.g. you have to have a locking fence/gate around the pool even if you don't have any children yourself...your local laws may be different).

If you live someplace colder you will either need to heat the water, or plan to drain the pool every winter. Heating is expensive, draining is a PITA.

Sure, splashing around in a pool is nice. But there's a lot required to make that possible. I would never have one again.

FWIW.

1poorguy
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If you live someplace colder you will either need to heat the water, or plan to drain the pool every winter. Heating is expensive, draining is a PITA.

I turn my system off from November through March every year and don't have to drain the pool.

PSU
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It doesn't freeze?

It's been a few decades, but freezing was always a concern because it could crack the pool walls (and the pipes). Maybe newer pool design has addressed that?
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It doesn't freeze?

It's been a few decades, but freezing was always a concern because it could crack the pool walls (and the pipes). Maybe newer pool design has addressed that?


It's not cold enough here to freeze all the way from top to bottom. So there is plenty of room for expansion. Also the skimmers have a Gizzmo in it to protect from freezing water.
https://www.amazon.com/Gizzmo-MWUG-Skimmer-Protection-Blowou...
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Not a pool owner but a pool user...

In the winter we rent a Florida home with a pool that the owner has professionally maintained. In the past 11 years the pool heater and pump (twice) have been replaced.

Spring to fall we use our city's community facilities including indoor and outdoor pools for a senior couple monthly fee of $30. The only hassle is a 2 mile drive to the indoor facility or a less than a mile walk to the outdoor aquatic center.

My next door neighbor has an in-ground pool which he maintains except for winter close-up. I hear his mumbling...

Good luck with your choice.

George
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We have a salt water pool and love it. We are in Florida and have a pool heater. We use the pool 12 months a year. In the perhaps 3 "Winter" months, we pull the cover over it in the evenings to keep the water from losing too much heat in the evenings. Then we pull the cover back in the daytime. We spend perhaps 30 minutes per week skimming it and cleaning out the filters. Where we are, I would estimate maybe 50% of the houses have a pool. Because of so many pools, we have pool stores nearby. We have a plastic bottle that we dip into the water and take a water sample (perhaps 1/2 pint of water) to the pool store every week or 2. They run it through a machine that analyzes the water in about 10 seconds. It then tells us if it needs anything added to the water and quantities to add. Probably half the time, one or 2 things need to be added. They have in their computer how many gallons our pool is.

We could hire a pool company to come once a week and do all this. That price is about $50 to $80 per month. (Depending on the size of the pool, if it has an adjoining hot tub, etc.)

When people go to sell their houses, buyers want a salt water pool. A chlorine pool is kind of old fashioned in the world of real estate around here. The fact that it is called a "salt water pool" doesn't really mean the water is salty. It is not salty like the ocean at all. It just means it is not a chlorine pool. I think if we were to ask pool construction companies where we are, they haven't sold a chlorine pool in a few years. Everyone wants a salt water pool now.

Our electric bill and water bill have not gone up very much. It is very slightly on both of them. In fact, we have been surprised, that the electric has not increased much and also the water bill has not. We love our pool and wish we would have bought one sooner. I am sure it is a different scenario to weight the pros and cons if you are in a Northern climate, but we would not have a house without one. Best of luck!

Footsox
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Thanks everyone for your input. In the end we decided against the home, though not because of the pool. We are no longer prejudiced against pool ownership, however, thanks to the education here. Also appreciated those who said they would never own a pool again. Honesty always good.

IP
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I have a 600 gallon steel tank I got thirty years ago with the vague aim of making a hot tub out of it. Instead, it's been serving as a cistern (rain barrel) making me independent of the city water supply.

On especially hot days, I'll dunk myself in the tank to cool off, and it serves that purpose very well. It's in the shade, so the water is a refreshing temperature rather than being hot.

It's also a main source of water for my garden and washing machine. During our seasonal summer drought, that can and has lowered the water level too much to use as a dunk tank, but summer showers have kept the level up to withing 4" of the top. What we haven't had are hot temperatures which would make me use it as a dunk tank.

Still no really hot temperatures in the forecast:
https://weather.com/weather/tenday/l/98108:4:US


Seattle Pioneer
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When people go to sell their houses, buyers want a salt water pool. A chlorine pool is kind of old fashioned in the world of real estate around here. The fact that it is called a "salt water pool" doesn't really mean the water is salty. It is not salty like the ocean at all. It just means it is not a chlorine pool. I think if we were to ask pool construction companies where we are, they haven't sold a chlorine pool in a few years. Everyone wants a salt water pool now.

Technically, salt pools are still chlorine pools....it's just a different source of chlorine. A "SWG" system is a saltwater chlorine generator. It uses special coated plates and electrical current so separate the sodium and chlorine molecules of the salt through electrolysis. The chlorine is still the sanitizer. You're just making your chlorine from salt instead of pouring in liquid chlorine (sodium hypochlorite), or adding granules of dichlor or pucks of trichlor or other forms.

The beauty of the saltwater system is that the salt isn't used it. It's separated, the chlorine does its job, and the sodium and chlorine will later recombine back into salt. You may lose a bit over time to splash out, leaks, and rain overflow (if you're tropical like me), etc. I tend to add a 40# bag once a season to keep it topped up.
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The other nice thing about SWG pools is that the level of chlorine can be lower than traditional chlorine pools. Since the chlorine is added continuously any time the pump and SWG are running, it takes less to keep the water clean.
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Owning an In-Ground Pool, by xtn

Chapter 1: PITA Level

Owning an in-ground pool, and staying on top of the maintenance of it, carries an upper-mid PITA level. Imagine you bought a pair of personal water craft (Jet Ski, Wave Runner, or similar). Now you know durn good and well that you're going to use them a lot those first two months while the weather is good and the excitement of newness still exists. Yay!

But hold on. Two months later, the lake weather is gone, and you've got ten months of payments to make on them before you use them again. Then you're only going to take them out three times the next Summer. And only twice a year thereafter. But you're still going to be paying for them every month.

Every July, you're going to spend $800 and 8 hours of your time getting them ready, in exchange for forty-five minutes of fun. By about the fifth or sixth year, you'll be begging a friend to buy them off you for ten cents on the dollar. You would have been way better off just renting them once is a while.

Owning a pool is worse than that.
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<<But hold on. Two months later, the lake weather is gone, and you've got ten months of payments to make on them before you use them again. Then you're only going to take them out three times the next Summer. And only twice a year thereafter. But you're still going to be paying for them every month.

Every July, you're going to spend $800 and 8 hours of your time getting them ready, in exchange for forty-five minutes of fun. By about the fifth or sixth year, you'll be begging a friend to buy them off you for ten cents on the dollar. You would have been way better off just renting them once is a while.

Owning a pool is worse than that.>>



That's the Way of Most Stuff.

It explains why our basements and garages are usually stuffed with stuff, and it explains why I don't bother with TRAVEL, which is buying stuff when the garage is already full.



Seattle Pioneer
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Owning a pool is worse than that.

I can certainly understand it being like that for some people but, in our experience, having a pool has been a heck of a lot of fun and not too bad to maintain.

Considering that we have active children and love to swim ourselves, we would've ended up joining a neighborhood pool/club at a cost of ~$1000 per year (and just thinking about the crowd there gives me heebie-jeebies.) Certainly we will never make up the cost difference to build our own pool but the privacy is so, so worth it to us.

Our property is a little unique and the pool is a bit removed from the house - a plus in some ways as safety is easier... We also built a separate entrance to that side of the yard and have told of some of our closest friends and family to come and go as they please. It has been the best and primary source of exercise for our aging parents (who live close by and drop by most afternoons) for the past few years. We just spent the whole weekend in and out of the pool with various friends and family and had a blast. My teenager is just realizing the joys of having her friends over to swim and my little one will swim with anybody, anytime.

Maintenance is not bad... like some others here, we have a salt water system. Some years have been under $100 for chemicals/salt for the season. We leave the automatic Polaris cleaner in all the time (and run it a few hours a day) and just pop it out when we swim. We never need to vacuum the bottom or scrub the sides beyond start-up for the season. Just empty the skimmer baskets as needed. We built the pool 12 years ago so we've been through replacing a lot of the equipment once now -- liner at year 9 ($4000), salt cell a couple years back (can't remember $$), etc. Surprisingly the heater is going strong and it extends our season significantly. Right now there are some leaks at the pool equipment and a board that needs to be replaced but we're going to baby it until fall when we shut things down and replace several things -- DH is a licensed plumber and handy in general so he is able to do most fixes to the equipment himself, saving us tons of money on maintenance labor.

Last year we swam into October and a warm spring let us start again in early April this year. The pain doing yard work in high summer is greatly mitigated by knowing there's a refreshing pool to jump in afterwards. And when football season starts again in late August we will roast ourselves at tailgates and then bring all the family back for a swim parties to cool off after the games. My biggest complaint of pool ownership is that is make the summer seem like it goes by too fast!

sjfans
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Having your own pool is more expensive than belonging to a private pool club. Having your own pool is more labor intensive than belonging to a private pool club. But my pool is open before Memorial Day and after Labor Day, open at 5am and 10pm if that's when I want to use it, and I can use my favorite float in the pool while enjoying my favorite beverage.

PSU
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Having your own pool is more expensive than belonging to a private pool club. Having your own pool is more labor intensive than belonging to a private pool club.

And most importantly, more private than swimming with all the members of the pool club. If I am going to swim in a pool, (and it looks as though I am as we decided to buy the house after all and just came back from inspection,) it won't be at a swim club or public pool.

No screaming kids unless we've invited them, dog can hang out poolside with us so no guilt of leaving him behind YET AGAIN, no need for perfectly shaved legs. Added plus...skinny dipping. The soon to be ours yard is fabulously private.

Thanks again for all the info.

IP
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My gym is open 24/7/365, and they have a pool. Indoors, so weather is irrelevant. I can use it almost any time (except for the two or three times per week they do "aqua zumba").
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My gym is open 24/7/365, and they have a pool. Indoors, so weather is irrelevant. I can use it almost any time (except for the two or three times per week they do "aqua zumba").

When I belonged to the local YMCA (which was a high end one), there are a number of days during the summer when either the pool was closed before I got there or was closed down while I was there because some young parents decided to bring their infant into the pool without a swim diaper (or the diaper failed). Closed until the next day.

PSU
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Ewww.

Not allowed at my gym. Little ones have to go to the day care center while the parents work out. I don't know what the age limit is (hasn't affected me...adult daughter), but there is one. No little kids past the front desk.
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Not allowed at my gym. Little ones have to go to the day care center while the parents work out. I don't know what the age limit is (hasn't affected me...adult daughter), but there is one. No little kids past the front desk.

One older kid or adult having a sudden barf attack will also close the pool.

PSU
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If solo exercise is your primary pool use a gym/club is a good way to go for sure...

Personally, I use my pool for some exercise plus relaxing/reading, wearing my children out, taking a break from work (I work from home,) chilling with a couple friends/family most afternoons, and hosting get-togethers with 10-20 people on any given weekend day, or 30+ on holidays. We often do potluck or takeout dinners or grill. All while listening to our choice of music, floating with our beverages of choice, etc.

YMMV... other friends of ours have chosen to put disposable income towards a lake house, mountain condo, hot tub, boats for the lake, etc - none of which is our sort of thing, though we all enjoy partaking of each other’s hobbies. To each his own!

sjfans
(Currently poolside :) )
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<<Last year we swam into October and a warm spring let us start again in early April this year. The pain doing yard work in high summer is greatly mitigated by knowing there's a refreshing pool to jump in afterwards. And when football season starts again in late August we will roast ourselves at tailgates and then bring all the family back for a swim parties to cool off after the games. My biggest complaint of pool ownership is that is make the summer seem like it goes by too fast!

sjfans>>


It was nice to read of someone who uses their luxury so often that it makes it worth while. Too often we are overloaded with luxuries and can't find the time to play with them to make them worthwhile.



Seattle Pioneer
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<<Having your own pool is more expensive than belonging to a private pool club. Having your own pool is more labor intensive than belonging to a private pool club. But my pool is open before Memorial Day and after Labor Day, open at 5am and 10pm if that's when I want to use it, and I can use my favorite float in the pool while enjoying my favorite beverage.

PSU>>


How do you deal with the risks of drowning accidents, horseplay and bad judgment by children and such?

Ever have any safety incidents that have been a worry?



Seattle Pioneer
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How do you deal with the risks of drowning accidents, horseplay and bad judgment by children and such?

Ever have any safety incidents that have been a worry?


5' privacy fence.
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No screaming kids unless we've invited them, dog can hang out poolside with us so no guilt of leaving him behind YET AGAIN, no need for perfectly shaved legs.


Fair points, all. But I've got to ask...why are you okay with hairy legs in front of your husband, whom presumably you want to find you attractive, but not in front of strangers, whom presumably you wouldn't care about? Trivial, I know. Just struck me as curiously odd.

xtn
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...some young parents decided to bring their infant into the pool without a swim diaper....


Was it a Baby Ruth situation?

xtn
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How do you deal with the risks of drowning accidents, horseplay and bad judgment by children and such? Ever have any safety incidents that have been a worry?


Oooo. When I was seventeen, my GF dove from the edge of a pool into the shallow end. She failed to dive in a mostly horizontal, shallow manner. Instead, she dove deep, and didn't even put her hands ought in front of her.

I knew what had happened before I saw the blood. I carried her out of the pool, folded her scalp back up over her skull and tried to stave off shock while somebody else called an ambulance. She was fine after 146 stitches and a month of recovery.

It wasn't the pool's fault though. The pool was all like, "Hey, you attacked me. I just defended myself."

xtn
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But I've got to ask...why are you okay with hairy legs in front of your husband, whom presumably you want to find you attractive, but not in front of strangers, whom presumably you wouldn't care about? Trivial, I know. Just struck me as curiously odd.

We take each other as we are and happily so. I met him playing on a co-ed corporate sports league and probably never looked worse than then, being all sweaty and grimy from playing hard. A friend and co-worker was appalled I was going to play and not just sit in the stands and look pretty like she did, (and IIRC I was the only female in that "co-ed" league,) but I figured if I just was myself and did what I liked doing, there was a better chance to find my soul mate. Try to be who you aren't and you're forced to pretend for the rest of your life. We see past the outside. And honestly, after decades of ripping the hair out by the roots, it's not that bad. Shaving is a futile never ending process. If you keep ripping the hair out, it eventually stops coming back. Hey, I don't fault him for his receding hair line. He can certainly deal with a few strays here and there.

Heh, bet you are sorry you asked now.

IP,
very happily married
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Makes sense to me.

My thinking was from the other side: why would you care what other people think? If they don't like hairy legs that's their problem, not yours.

JMHO

1poorguy (doesn't give a crap what other people think; if I'm not hurting anyone or breaking a law I'll do as I please)
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My thinking was from the other side: why would you care what other people think?

The longer I live the more I realize it's not always good to thumb your nose at convention. At least not in public.

IP
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Heh, bet you are sorry you asked now.


LOL not at all. I appreciate your nice explanation. It makes a good story, it's got some philosophical wisdom in it, and highlights the quality of your relationship. Thanks.

The only bit it doesn't address is why then would you care about it in front of a bunch of stranger kids at a public pool.

xtn
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Heh...as I get older I care less and less what others think about me. I come to realize it just doesn't matter.

Interesting how we're going in different directions as we both are aging.
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The only bit it doesn't address is why then would you care about it in front of a bunch of stranger kids at a public pool.

I don't really, but it was kind of a generic explanation of why private is so much better than public. Any reason not to exercise that can be eliminated is a good thing to toss. I have always hated public pools. It's one reason why we rent homes with pools for vacation, rather than hotel rooms with shared pools. I have my own exercise equipment too. If I have to get in the car...way easier to be lazy if you have to drive there.

If I want to be social, I'll invite people over to share my pool. Sometimes other people are a joy but often I find I prefer my solitude or family only. Makes sense to me but no doubt not to everyone. According to a Meyers-Briggs analysis done during a management training class for work, I have a very unique personality. Literally 50% introvert, 50% extrovert. The guy who was testing us actually retested me one on one to make sure I understood the questions. He had never seen that before.

IP,
I/ENTJ
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Heh...as I get older I care less and less what others think about me. I come to realize it just doesn't matter.

Yeah, I am mellowing with age. Kind of front loaded the attitude early on and am learning to chill a bit. Probably came with happiness and leaving anger behind. Mostly though, I simply try to avoid convention. I can do that with my own pool. And while I have found clothing optional beaches, it's tougher to find a YMCA that is OK with that.

IP
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According to a Meyers-Briggs analysis done during a management training class for work, I have a very unique personality.


I've never taken such a test, but I seem to be quite polarizing. People seem to either really like me or they really, really don't. And it seems to lean to about 75% don't. I should have a T-shirt that says, "Trigger Warning!"



xtn
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According to a Meyers-Briggs analysis done during a management training class for work, I have a very unique personality

There is no such thing as “very unique.” Unique means “one of a kind”. You can’t be more unique than unique.

Yes, I know this belongs on the Nazi grammar board, but no one here would see it there.
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There is no such thing as “very unique.” Unique means “one of a kind”. You can’t be more unique than unique.


So helpful. Thank you ever so much for your selfless efforts to improve my command of the English language.

Yes, I know this belongs on the Nazi grammar board, but no one here would see it there.

Then perhaps that was the right place for your comment.

IP
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So helpful. Thank you ever so much for your selfless efforts to improve my command of the English language.

You're welcome.

Then perhaps that was the right place for your comment.

Then you never would have seen it. Now you know. How else do you learn, except to learn? You should try not to be offended when someone helps you.

I learned this on an episode of "The West Wing." I did not get mad at the TV.
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You should try not to be offended when someone helps you.

Offended? No. A little sorry for you that you feel the need to point out someone's minor error? Yes.

There. Hope you take that with the intent to help you with which it was offered.

IP,
suggesting you feel free to correct my posts if you REALLY desperately feel the need to do so, since I don't take the time to proofread them or spend time agonizing over sentence construction
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To say nothing of all the rest of us who benefited from this useful reminder. 8-)
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RH, did you mean to post an 8 in your smiley face? :)
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RH, did you mean to post an 8 in your smiley face? :)

I assumed it meant glasses.

IP
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RH, did you mean to post an 8 in your smiley face? :)

Yes, I always use an 8 in my smiley faces. Just as I always wear glasses. 8-)
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Ohhhh! Now I get it. :)
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