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My wife's surefire method for years has been to just roast the turkey (no stuffing inside), all sealed up in foil, at a high temp; she then uncovers it briefly toward the end, I think, to brown. Comes out juicy, nicely done.

But do NOT roast a turkey with stuffing inside. Not safe.

Have a lovely Thanksgiving, all! We hope everyone gets to/got to their destinations safely. Looks awful out west!

Vermonter
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Wishing y’all a happy T-Day.

But do NOT roast a turkey with stuffing inside. Not safe.

I been eating stuffing cooked inside of turkeys, chickens, ducks and turduckens for about 75 years now and never had a problem yet, me. The secret is to know the temperature of the bird and also the stuffing. This year I roasted a 5-pound turkey breast (Big bird boob) that I stuffed. Using my “Thermopro” (See; https://buythermopro.com/product/thermopro-tp-17-digital-mea...), I had one probe in the thickest part of the meat and the second probe in the center of the stuffing. The USDA recommends that poultry be cooked to at least 165 degrees F but it is known that salmonella bacteria will die within 30 seconds at a temperature of 160 degrees F. In this case, the temperature of the meat reached 167 degrees and the stuffing got up to 165 degrees before I pulled the bird boob from the oven. Came out quite good IMHO.
;-)

C.J.V. - an unstuffed bird is a hollow bird and if it ain’t cooked in da bird it ain’t stuffing, No
;-)
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Some years ago, maybe 10 or so, I learned about cooking a turkey upside down for the first 1/3 of the cooking time (1/2 is a wee bit too long). THis melts the bottom fat into the meat. Then flip over to crisp the top skin. No basting or covering needed, although flipping the bird(!) is a trick in itself.
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I been eating stuffing cooked inside of turkeys, chickens, ducks and turduckens for about 75 years now and never had a problem yet, me. The secret is to know the temperature of the bird and also the stuffing. This year I roasted a 5-pound turkey breast (Big bird boob) that I stuffed. Using my “Thermopro” (See; https://buythermopro.com/product/thermopro-tp-17-digital-mea...), I had one probe in the thickest part of the meat and the second probe in the center of the stuffing. The USDA recommends that poultry be cooked to at least 165 degrees F but it is known that salmonella bacteria will die within 30 seconds at a temperature of 160 degrees F. In this case, the temperature of the meat reached 167 degrees and the stuffing got up to 165 degrees before I pulled the bird boob from the oven. Came out quite good IMHO.

I bought a Thermopro TP-20 shortly before Thanksgiving and used it for the turkey this year. I like this thermometer because it has a separate unit that you can place anywhere in the house to monitor the temperature. I don't have to go into the kitchen or outside to the grill to read the temperature. Great with a turkey because I could watch football and not worry about the turkey.

I placed one probe in the turkey breast and used the other probe to monitor the temperature of my grill. I found that my in-the-lid grill thermometer is way off on its temperature reading. I took the turkey off as soon as it hit 165F. It's the best turkey we had in years. I'm assuming that in other years I was overcooking it. Also cooked a good rib roast the next day.

PSU
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I bought a Thermopro TP-20 shortly before Thanksgiving and used it for the turkey this year. I like this thermometer because it has a separate unit that you can place anywhere in the house to monitor the temperature.

I bought one of them wireless thermometers for use while smoking pork for pulled pig 7 or 6 years ago. Problem was that it didn’t have a long enough range and I have too much metal in the house for it to work inside. I threw it out last month when I bought the new Thermopro.

I found that my in-the-lid grill thermometer is way off on its temperature reading.

Many years ago, I found that them in-the-lid thermometers be about as useful as mammary glands on a boar. For checking the temperatures in my smokers, I use dial thermometers like (https://www.amazon.com/Escali-AHC1-Listed-Thermometer-Silver... ). The local hardware store has them by Taylor for around 6 bucks. I check their accuracy with boiling water and have one with the probe mounted below the cooking grate and a second one with the probe in the lid.
;-)

C.J.V. - works great, yes
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Many years ago, I found that them in-the-lid thermometers be about as useful as mammary glands on a boar. For checking the temperatures in my smokers, I use dial thermometers like (https://www.amazon.com/Escali-AHC1-Listed-Thermometer-Silver...... ). The local hardware store has them by Taylor for around 6 bucks. I check their accuracy with boiling water and have one with the probe mounted below the cooking grate and a second one with the probe in the lid.

One reason I liked monitoring the temperature of the inside of the grill remotely is that I didn't have to open the lid. If I had to check the temperature with a dial thermometer, I would be opening and closing the lid multiple times. The temperature inside would be bouncing up and down.

PSU
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