No. of Recommendations: 4
Mom still in rehab center. She doing a little tiny bit better but still needs a wheel chair behind her to walk. She can walk at times. She doing hand excersices in the rehab room.

Dad is having hand bars put in the bathrooms and get that done tommorow. He took 2 quotes and took the lowest one. I'm letting dad decide if an when mom comes home. I have no business trying to get mom in and out of bed. Last Sunday I went to the facility and fed mom . I wheeled her back to her room and she had a seisure spell that scared the hebby gebbys out of me. She did not respond to anyone including the nurses. I almost had to have her put back in the hospital emergency room again. She ok again but still needs assistance. I see her every night as I come home from work.

Last week I had 11 teeth pulled and got a top denture put in. I have $254.00 worth of debt still from this on my slate card at 0% for 12 months. The insurance is still pending. I'm hoping most of it will be adjusted to the negotiated fees they agreed to.

The intermediate denture cost me $800 I paid this off by taking money out of my HSA account and paying AX off.

Next year I have to get a perm denture taken. I will cost over $1400 plus the $267 reline fee.

I have $61 in check which I'll pay the minimum of $25 on the Freedom card which has a balance of $240 on it.

My balance on AX ==$0

I have $40 in efund at AZFCU

My Nissan Sentra car balance = $10920.

My stock loan balance $380
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Thanks for the update! I've been worried. Keep your chin up.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
My Nissan Sentra car balance = $10920.

Vehicles I've owned since I was 18 have cost me an average of $250/year, excluding gas, oil and insurance - Some have been pretty nice, and collectible. All have been reliable, after some work (included in the $250/year average.)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Among some of the nicer/collectible cars I've owned:

1956 Chevrolet BelAir Convertible, fully restored.
1964 MG Midget, fully restored.
1970 MGB Convertible, needs carburetors rebuilt, but otherwise, pretty, fully restored:

http://m229.photobucket.com/albumview/albums/NoIDAtAll/70%20...

http://m229.photobucket.com/albumview/albums/NoIDAtAll/70%20...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
I wheeled her back to her room and she had a seisure spell that scared the hebby gebbys out of me. She did not respond to anyone including the nurses. I almost had to have her put back in the hospital emergency room again.

You and your father need to talk to her doctor about the seizures. You need to know how to judge the difference between a seizure that would require a trip to emergency and one that is best handled with just TLC until she recovers.

Seizures are very scary, and she isn't going to respond during or for awhile after a seizure. A first seizure is unconditionally an emergency room and requires a full evaluation. For someone with a history of seizures, an emergency room visit for an "average" seizure is likely useless and may just be stressful.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 13
NoIDAtAll,

You wrote, Vehicles I've owned since I was 18 have cost me an average of $250/year, excluding gas, oil and insurance - Some have been pretty nice, and collectible. All have been reliable, after some work (included in the $250/year average.)

I see only two ways anyone could swing $250/year in maintenance and repairs on a vehicle. 1. They live in a city where they can walk, bicycle or ride the bus most of time (so the car sits idle most of the time); or 2. They buy low-cost, high-mileage cars and do all their own repairs. I suspect you're talking about the later.

I know a guy that actually tends to make money on his cars. He used to be a race car mechanic. He buys car models he knows well, that have some problems and he can get parts cheap. He buys them cheap, fixes them up over time, drives them when they're running (he usually has two or three at any given time, so one is always drive-able) and almost always sells them for more than he puts into them.

But that's really a hobby for him. He doesn't make enough money doing it to make a living. His regular job doesn't make him a bundle and this is a way for him to cover his transportation costs, earn gas money while doing something he likes. And sometimes he winds up owning some cool cars for a while.

But not everyone is mechanically inclined (or talented) enough to do their own car maintenance. In fact, without a mentor it's easy to pick the wrong car or to create more problems with a car than you solve. The result can actually wind up costing as much or more than if you'd paid someone and you're still out your time and the money you spent on materials.

So it's great that *YOU* are able to get away with $250/year on a car. Most people can't and I'd be reluctant to suggest they try unless they're already motivated...

- Joel
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
So it's great that *YOU* are able to get away with $250/year on a car. Most people can't and I'd be reluctant to suggest they try unless they're already motivated...

Thank you for saying this. Every time I hear someone say they bought their last car for $500 and it runs great, I think about the number of cars I've sold for scrap because they were no longer running and was paid $500 for them.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Thank you for saying this. Every time I hear someone say they bought their last car for $500 and it runs great, I think about the number of cars I've sold for scrap because they were no longer running and was paid $500 for them.

I know this story isn't about the kind of repair work you do, since this is a full restoration, I love reading this message board for the comments and updates. One of the things that struck me was the number of people lamenting that their kids weren't interested in cars, and only wanted to play video games.

People with your skills are becoming fewer and fewer every year. Even the mechanics with real understanding of cars seem to be in fewer numbers. But this young woman is really remarkable.

http://www.fiero.nl/forum/Forum1/HTML/085309.html

Nancy
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
I see only two ways anyone could swing $250/year in maintenance and repairs on a vehicle. 1. They live in a city where they can walk, bicycle or ride the bus most of time (so the car sits idle most of the time); or 2. They buy low-cost, high-mileage cars and do all their own repairs. I suspect you're talking about the later.

I bought my last car in 1996 for $2200. It was a 1992 Ford Escort with 55,000 miles on it. The clutch was slipping, but otherwise it was in very good condition. I use to work on cars quite a bit, but no longer care to. I paid a good shop $500 to replace the clutch, which I thought was fair for the front wheel drive car. I've had the front brakes redone 3 times and the rear brakes twice. A couple of months ago I had the A/C compressor replaced with a good used one for $200... He quoted me $150, but I thought he did a good job and gave him an extra $50. (Another shop had quoted $1,000... which might not had been too far off, IF metal fragments had gotten into the system when the compressor went, but they hadn't.) It's now 17 years old and has around 185,000 miles on it. It gets me where I'm going reliably.

Over the years I've rebuilt around 16 car engines. I learned on the first one to disassemble the engine, take it to a machine shop, have them hot tank it, replace the freeze plugs, check the rods for straight and the big ends for size, bore the cylinders to the next size to get them straight, replace the pistons and wrist pins and go through the head, checking the springs and valves, replacing as needed and, usually, bushing the valve guides and then grinding the valves and seats with a 3-angle grind. I then reassemble, clecking bearing clearance with Plastigage, using a name brand gasket set and sealer and a torque wrench to tighten all of the fasteners. It usually cost me around $1200 to $1500 to redo an engine, but they ran great. I cost me around $150 to $200 to have (3-speed) automatic transmissions rebuilt by a shop, if I removed and replaced the transmission.

I sell insurance for a living. A foreman at a body shop I referred a lot of insured to showed me how to replace a quarter panel and do some body work. I also took a class in body work at a local trade school.

It was an enjoyable hobby for me. I sold some cars I wish I hadn't, among them my first car, a 1956 Chevy convertible.

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
It was an enjoyable hobby for me. I sold some cars I wish I hadn't, among them my first car, a 1956 Chevy convertible.

Another car I liked was a 1964 MG Midget. I bought the car from an Insurance client for $75 - It didn't run and the body was pretty banged up, but solid. The guys daughter's boyfriend had an argument with the daughter and drove the P out of it, leaving the car parked parked on a street, after disconnecting the fuel line. I had it towed to my home, reconnected the fuel line, backed out of the driveway, shifted to first gear and drove about 3 ft before the transmission locked up... I backed up and drove forward another 3 ft, when it locked up again - I backed into the driveway and later pulled the engine and transmission - The car had a plate under the transmission, so I couldn't remove them separately. After removing the engine and transmission, I dismantled both. The insides of the transmission were in good condition, but the bearing flanges were wallowed out. I bought a used transmission with a sound case, but the synchronizers were badly worn, so I swapped the insides of the one into the case of the other - done, for $85, plus some sealant, lubricant and around 6 hours of rebuild time.

I went pretty cheap on rebuilding the motor - The was an arc on the crankshaft. I took it to a local machine shop to regrind... When I picked it up, there was a little bit of arc left on the journals, but I figured the machine shop knew what their work, and used it - I rebuilt the engine, installed the transmission on it, and put it back in the car... The engine started knocking after 75 miles. *sigh*

I pulled the engine and transmission, again, removed the transmission and clutch, disassemble the engine, took the crankshaft to the machine shop and asked for a refund, of the $25 they charged me to grind the crankshaft - I thought that a simple request, all things considered. The shop foreman refused the refund. I asked him why, and what else could have caused the motor to fail in such a short time frame - He responded, "Dirt"... I had cleaned the engine and its oil galleries pretty extensively, at a car wash, but not had it hot tanked. He had also checked the rods, found 2 bent and straightened them. I took the parts to a machine shop that machined engines for race cars. They machined the crankshaft and check the rods - found 2 still bent, and straightened them. I told them that I did not want to pull and rebuild the engine again, and asked if there was a way to assure that the rods were perfectly straight - Their reply was that they could ream out the old bushings, in the upper end of the rods, as the piston wrist pins floated in the upper end of the rods, rather than the pistons, in the particular motor, and then the lower and upper ends of the rods would be perfectly perpendicular. I axed them how much that would cost - $40. I asked if there was anything else they could do to assure that have to rebuild the motor again. They recommended balancing the motor (crankshaft, rods, pistons and flywheel), as doing so would "add to longevity." I asked how much - $80... I didn't blink an eye at accepting that - When I put it back together, it ran like a sewing machine.

I replaced the convertible top and installed new upholstery - pretty simple.

The owners of a body shop wanted to go on a vacation, and keep their accomplished sons out of trouble, so they charged them with straightening and repainting the car with a white acrylic enamel and black rocker panels, with a hardener that was impervious to bird droppings, bugs and tree sap, or eggs, for that matter. The car looked, ran and cornered exceptionally... The reason I sold it was that pickup trucks and SUVs tended to tailgate, at the level of my head, to an extent that could/would decapitate me.

That's some of my background, FWIW.

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
My former/estranged spouse gave me a 1970 MGB Roadster that she paid $3500 to buy. Her only request was that I leave it to our Grandson. I have it, pretty much, restored, except for rebuilding the SU carburetors - I will have to think about leaving it to our Grandson, unless I get time and funds to install an adequate protective cage and decent safety belts - IMHO, the car is a death trap, otherwise.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
So it's great that *YOU* are able to get away with $250/year on a car. Most people can't...

- Joel


"Can't" is something I was trained and educated a fallacy, and a negative perspective to assume. I find it VERY hard to say "I can't", if/when I can.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
My former/estranged spouse gave me a 1970 MGB Roadster that she paid $3500 to buy. Her only request was that I leave it to our Grandson. I have it, pretty much, restored, except for rebuilding the SU carburetors - I will have to think about leaving it to our Grandson, unless I get time and funds to install an adequate protective cage and decent safety belts - IMHO, the car is a death trap, otherwise.

Give it back and let her save it for the grandson.

PSU
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
IIRC, you included GAS in that $250/year figure, and that's what I can't figure out.

I know I drive a lot less than some people, because there are days/weeks I don't leave the house. But I still spend ~$80/mo in gas at the current prices, that's almost a grand per year right there.

But no, not everyone can do $250/year for a car.

All the work you say you've put into it? What if you had no tools and lived in an apartment that forbid working on cars in the parking lot?

And I'm someone who drives a car that's more than 20 years old. I've done some of my own work, but I'm not up to pulling out an engine or a transmission by myself, mostly because I don't have the tools or the space. I've done work I've had to do because there was no choice, but mostly, I've had to pay other people to work on it. Sometimes I can do that payment as a trade off of skills, but still.

Ishtar
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
ishtarastarte,

You wrote, IIRC, you included GAS in that $250/year figure, and that's what I can't figure out.

I don't think you recall correctly. (Actually you could just look.)

What NoIDAtAll actually wrote was, Vehicles I've owned since I was 18 have cost me an average of $250/year, excluding gas, oil and insurance ...

He explicitly excluded gas, oil and insurance from that figure.

You should also take his statement a little tongue in cheek, because that's probably an average that spans a few decades. The cost and complexity of cars have gone up over those years the same as everything else, so it's extremely unlikely NoIDAtAll's cars will continue to cost him $250/year going forward.

Even so, it's a pretty bold claim. Even if you adjust for historical inflation (I don't really know his time frame, so I can't really adjust) and say that going forward he's only expecting to pay $500/year, that's still quite cheap.

- Joel
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Ah, thanks, I did read it wrong - I should have looked.

Ishtar
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
IIRC, you included GAS in that $250/year figure, and that's what I can't figure out.

You recalled what I posted incorrectly, Ishtar.

I've done some of my own work, but I'm not up to pulling out an engine or a transmission by myself, mostly because I don't have the tools or the space.

I collected a lot of tools over the years, including a compressor capable of operating pneumatic tools and painting a car - The pneumatic tools make work a lot easier and faster, and I also bought a MIG welder. I bought the bigger stuff a little at a time, and pneumatic tools didn't cost me a great deal - There's not a whole lot to many of them - An air compressor does the work. I also just rented some tools, like an engine hoist.

I know what you're saying about the space. I live in an apartment, too. Fortunately, my employer has allowed me to use the spacious garage at the back of the office. He realized that letting me use it saved me quite a bit. You can see the garage in this slideshow taken when I was doing some work on my MG: http://s229.photobucket.com/user/NoIDAtAll/media/1970%20MGB/...

I've done work I've had to do because there was no choice, but mostly, I've had to pay other people to work on it. Sometimes I can do that payment as a trade off of skills, but still.

As I grow older (I'm now 64) I am leaning more and more in that direction, too. When I was 19, I removed and replaced an engine in my 56 Chevy in the middle of winter on my back in 18" of snow... brrr! Now I prefer to have someone else do The work. I can, usually, find someone to do needed work reasonably, and I can usually tell the guy's workmanship, by listening to him, and by watching how he handles himself working.

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Even so, it's a pretty bold claim. Even if you adjust for historical inflation (I don't really know his time frame, so I can't really adjust) and say that going forward he's only expecting to pay $500/year, that's still quite cheap.

- Joel



I gave you an example, Joel:

1992 Ford Escort purchased in 1996. 2013 - 1996 = 17 years.
Original cost of the car: $2200
Cost of replacing the clutch: $500
I also had to have the time belt replaced once (I forgot to mention): $500
5 brake jobs (3 front, 2 rear jobs), $75 each: $375
2 sets of tires: $550.

I think that totals around $4,125, and dividing that by 17 years I think totals a little less than $250/year.

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Whoops, I forgot the air conditioner compressor: $200, so a total over 17 years of $4325, or around $255/year.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
Hmmm, I'm thinking you should include the cost of the tools in your estimation of the total/average cost.

Ishtar
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Hmmm, I'm thinking you should include the cost of the tools in your estimation of the total/average cost.

Ishtar



Fair enough - Add, say, $4000, over 46 years... And, I (or my surviving family) should be able to recover 1/3 to 1/2 of that, realistically, when I decide to hang it up and no longer work on stuff - not just vehicles, but also lawn equipment, chainsaws, computer workstations and servers I've built from scratch that my employer paid me for, other people's vehicles I've work on and have been paid decently for - a Dodge Super Bee, a high performance Dodge Charger, both with blown engines, a couple of neighbors' cars, an Olds Cutlass that my Mother owned with a diesel engine that blew head gaskets, so I bought a core Olds gasoline engine from a salvage yard, rebuilt it and replaced it and had the transmission rebuilt for $150 + $25 for a rebuilt torque converter. The car lasted her the rest of her life, about 15 years, w/o a problem.

I also forgot that I replaced suspension parts on the 92 Escort - inner and outer tie rod ends, ball joints, rear struts and rear anti-sway bar end links. The ball joints ran around $25. The end links around $5. The struts around $95. The inner and outer tie rod ends around $25, so around $150 in parts and I paid a friend $80 to help me for the 4 or 5 hours it took - Call it $250.

I also did quite a bit of body work on a car my Dad owned - I think he drove by feel. <g> I straightened all of the dents out, sprayed it with a lacquer primer/surfacer, wet sanded it, puttied in some small imperfections, sprayed and wet sanded it again and took it to a shop to spray with a primer sealer and Sikkens polyurethane base coat/clear coat, for the cost of materials, around $250... The car looked like it had just rolled off the assembly line when I gave it back to him (The shop that painted the finish coats on the car redid a significant number of GM's paint problems, and did over $1.5 million/year in auto body repair work - They also did a 1981 Nissan 280ZX Turbo - Painted it with a 1995 Ford Currant Red - think Cranberry... beautiful appearance), but D.O.D. still drove by feel. ~ ~

What else would you care to add? I liked the projects and they, pretty much, paid for themselves, either from payments from people whose vehicles I worked on or in cost savings on my own vehicles, plus I learned enough to know a good mechanic from a bad one and we share common interests, so I was and am given some breaks, and know when to walk, but w/o being disrespectful.

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
I liked the projects

This right here is the key.

This was a hobby for you - one you enjoyed.

I don't think other people would enjoy it nearly as much as you did - so expecting others to get an average of $250 per year for maintenance and upkeep is unrealistic.

I mean, it's really cool that you've done it. Awesome - more power to you.

But it's not a path for everyone.

You look at your cars differently from the majority of people.

It's your hobby - it's something to do.

Other people don't see that when they look at the car. They want to sit down, turn the key (or press the button) and have it take them where they need to go.

When it doesn't - well, most people aren't going to be ripping it apart themselves.

I mean, my current car is over 20 years old, but I only bought it two years ago. I've replaced a tire, alternator, starter, clutch, and battery. It needs a new compressor for the a/c, but that's not happening any time soon.

I had to have a mechanic do the clutch - it just wasn't feasible for me to even attempt it. That was $600 (and I talked him down from $800).

Just that repair puts me over your $250/year for this vehicle.

Ishtar
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
He realized that letting me use it saved me quite a bit. You can see the garage in this slideshow taken when I was doing some work on my MG: http://s229.photobucket.com/user/NoIDAtAll/media/1970%20MGB/......

When I checked that, I didn't get what I thought I would - Let me try this single picture. I hope it works.

http://m229.photobucket.com/albumview/albums/NoIDAtAll/70%20...

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I mean, my current car is over 20 years old, but I only bought it two years ago. I've replaced a tire, alternator, starter, clutch, and battery. It needs a new compressor for the a/c, but that's not happening any time soon.

I had to have a mechanic do the clutch - it just wasn't feasible for me to even attempt it. That was $600 (and I talked him down from $800).

Just that repair puts me over your $250/year for this vehicle.


Well, you bought your 20 year old car only recently, Ishtar - I bought mine when it was only 4 years old and had only 55,000 miles on it, and drove it 17 years. It had a known defect, that I knew and knew how to get repaired at a reasonable cost. I have bought cars 20 or more year old cars and kept them running reliably and safely for far less than the cost of a new or late model car. Some people, perhaps a number of people, like to trade their cars in every 2-3 years for new ones. I think (pretty sure) doing so will cost quite a bit more than costs I've experienced, but maybe they need the new models to transport clients or company reps, and impress them, reasonably - I don't... I've had/have my collectible cars to do that, or my employer's late model vehicle, if I wanted (or needed) to do that - more funner. <BG>

D.O.D. (Dear Old Dad) once told me, "A car is transportation." - I listened and heard what he said.

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Give it back and let her save it for the grandson.

PSU


She can't do that.

Also, our Grandson is not "the" Grandson, it's ours.

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Also, our Grandson is not "the" Grandson, it's ours.

Meaning HE is one we both care about, but you will probably understand "it" better, as that is the way you often tend to project your thoughts.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I liked the projects
------
This right here is the key.

This was a hobby for you - one you enjoyed...


Yes, I understand and realize that.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
It needs a new compressor for the a/c, but that's not happening any time soon.

Maybe you will get lucky like I did, Ishtar, and find a decent mechanic to replace the compressor for you with a sound used one for $150, including evacuating and recharging the system. I thought he did quite a bit, and did a good job, so I paid him an extra $50, and added his phone number to my list of contacts on my cell phone. I would have liked the serpentine (and timing) belts replaced while he was at it, but he said there weren't any cracks in the serpentine belt on the car, and it has a non-interference type engine, so no major engine damage will result if the timing belt should break, again - If the timing belt should break, it will cost me a tow, but, if it breaks here, I know where to have it towed - Otherwise, if the timing belt should break, it's around a $400-$600 repair bill. IF the car had an interference type engine, a new engine would be required if the timing belt breaks, because, in all probability, the valves and pistons will collide, causing severe internal engine damage. In those types of engines, the timing belt should be replaced every 80,000 or so miles, as you risk having to replace the engine, vs just replacing the belt - You can verify that information on TMF's car board http://boards.fool.com/buying-and-maintaining-a-car-100143.a... or with any qualified mechanic, if you wish.

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I had the car's serpentine belt replaced at a local Valvoline oil change shop a few years ago - It took the lady mechanic who did it less than 5 minutes - She removed the old/cracked belt by inserting a screw driver between the belt and a pulley, while the engine was running. It cost me around $100 to have the belt replaced, IIRC, but ii was interesting to watch her technique.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
She can't do that.

If she is unable to financially afford to store it, she can then dispose of it. She gave you a conditional gift. If the conditions no longer are suitable, then you return the gift. I've seen other posts where your finances are tight. Spending more funds to try to improve the safety of a car that is marginally safe in good condition doesn't seem like a good use of funds.

Also, our Grandson is not "the" Grandson, it's ours.

Yes, it is your estranged wife and your grandson. He isn't my grandson. Therefore, using the word "the" would be correct in my posts.

PSU
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Meaning HE is one we both care about, but you will probably understand "it" better, as that is the way you often tend to project your thoughts.

Huh?
Print the post Back To Top