Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 0
I'm back. Another "how the heck do you do that" sort of question.

Recently i've developed a fondness for making "Bacon Egg & Cheese McMuffins" at home. English muffins.

I did it a few times just cracking the egg into a small skillet and frying freeform. But of course, the egg spreads to a larger diameter than the muffin, so you end up having to fold it over and one side of the muffin has more egg than the other yadda yadda. I wanted something a little neater.

So i was walking through a kitchen type store and noticed a set of two stainless steel egg rings for 3 bucks. Not bad, what do i have to lose? So i picked em up.

Well, apparently they aren't as simple as they would appear at first glance. I tried to use one a couple days ago, and it was a miserable failure. I heated the skillet to about medium with the egg ring in the center. Once it was hot, i broke the egg and dumped the contents into the ring. After most of it was cooked, i wanted to flip it and finish cooking the other side.

It broke into many pieces when i tried to flip it, and large bits stuck to the side of the ring. So much for a neat little circle of fried egg.

What did i do wrong? Will it help if i spray the ring with cooking spray? Can it not be flipped it all? Is there a trick to this?

Thanks!

Bon
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
RE: Bon: "What did i do wrong?"

I use my English Muffin Rings for this, but the procedure should be the same.

Grease the ring well. Once the egg is done on one side it should have set well enough for you to remove the ring and then flip it over.

SB (uses the rings for molding all kinds of stuff)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
I used to manage a McDonald's, so I am an expert on making the eggs you are wanting for your homemade McMuffins.

The first thing you have to do is generously butter the inside of the ring and the bottom of the pan. At the restuarant, we had an egg ring that held 8 at a time, so we set it on the grill and used a butter brush to douse the entire works liberally.

Next, you crack your eggs into the ring. We ised to puncture our yolks, as per MCD standards, but I personally prefer a whole yolk.

Then we covered it with the special top, which was a big metal plate with a funnel on the top. Water went into the funnel and dripped down over the eggs, thus poaching them fromt he top while frying them on the bottom.

When they were done, we would lift the egg rings and the eggs would fall out. If any stuck, we would run a knife along the ring and release it.

After that, for best MCD duplication, set the eggs on a plate for 10 minutes and them microwave them to heat them back up. ;) Just kidding.

I have tried to duplicate the process at home without success. The best thing I could come up with was to use a normal egg poacher (since these eggs really are more poached than fried) and then when they are almost finished, dump them into a fry pan and brown one side slightly.

I hope this helps

RJ
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I make mine with a regular egg poacher also. Of course, I already owned the poacher so it seemed a natural solution to me.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
i've developed a fondness for making "Bacon Egg & Cheese McMuffins

You can nuke the egg.

I put a dab of butter into a fairly flat-bottomed cup. Nuke that for 10 -15 seconds. Then put the egg in. You must pierce the yolk well (otherwise it explodes!) I use a fork - don't mix the egg, but be sure that the yolk is broken. Nuke for 15 - 20 seconds and then turn the egg over and nuke again, depending on how hard you want the yolk.

Depending on the power of your microwave, you might have to experiment a little to get the egg cooked the way you like. But all in all, it takes less than a minute from beginning to end.

Christina
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
You can nuke the egg.

I put a dab of butter into a fairly flat-bottomed cup. Nuke that for 10 -15 seconds. Then put the egg in. You must pierce the yolk well (otherwise it explodes!) I use a fork - don't mix the egg, but be sure that the yolk is broken. Nuke for 15 - 20 seconds and then turn the egg over and nuke again, depending on how hard you want the yolk.

Depending on the power of your microwave, you might have to experiment a little to get the egg cooked the way you like. But all in all, it takes less than a minute from beginning to end.


I use a 4 oz. ramekin coated in cooking spray and nuke for about 45 seconds. Works very well, but frying does have a better flavor.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
You can nuke the egg.


I can attest to this. I use a small ramekin and spray it with Pam rather than use butter, but the idea is the same.

I also go ahead and add salt and pepper while using the fork to make sure the yolk is broke.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
frying does have a better flavor

I actually find that using butter instead of cooking spray helps with the flavor. (I also like not having the frying pan to clean!)

Christina
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I use egg rings often - here's what works for me:

I let the egg ring warm up in the pan first, before cracking the egg into it. If I'm cooking sausage or bacon in the pan, then there's usually enough fat in there already and it splashes up into the ring so it doesn't seem to need extra greasing.

If I'm just cooking eggs, I'll spray the egg ring with cooking spray or grease with butter, then heat the ring in a lightly greased pan over moderate heat. Crack the egg into the ring and cook over low/moderate heat - the white of the egg will shrink away from the sides of the ring a little bit when it's ready and I never seem to have a problem with it sticking to the ring. If you need to flip the egg, just slide the turner under the ring with the egg in it and flip it. You should be able to hook the edge of the flipper between the egg and ring and remove the ring easily that way. If you don't want to flip the egg, baste it with a little fat from the pan and it will help set the yolk.

A
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
If you don't want to flip the egg, baste it with a little fat from the pan and it will help set the yolk.

In recent times, whenever I fry eggs, just before they're "done", I add a couple of drops of water to them (and I mean two or three drops), put a lid on the pan, cook for a few seconds and then turn the heat off and let them steam for a couple of seconds. This sets the yolk and yet doesn't result in the browned bottom - which I detest.

Christina
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Well, apparently they aren't as simple as they would appear at first glance. I tried to use one a couple days ago, and it was a miserable failure. I heated the skillet to about medium with the egg ring in the center. Once it was hot, i broke the egg and dumped the contents into the ring. After most of it was cooked, i wanted to flip it and finish cooking the other side.

It broke into many pieces when i tried to flip it, and large bits stuck to the side of the ring. So much for a neat little circle of fried egg.

What did i do wrong? Will it help if i spray the ring with cooking spray? Can it not be flipped it all? Is there a trick to this?


Okay, I'm late to the party on this one, and the answer, I'm sure, has already been offered. If this is the case, then the yolk's on me. :-)

Anyway, I have a few of these egg rings, and I love 'em. I never have a problem. I bought mine in Bed,Bath and Beyond. They're non-stick coated which makes it easier. I still even give them a quick spray with Pam, and I never have the problem of them sticking.

Hope this helps!

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Anyway, I have a few of these egg rings, and I love 'em. I never have a problem. I bought mine in Bed,Bath and Beyond. They're non-stick coated which makes it easier. I still even give them a quick spray with Pam, and I never have the problem of them sticking.

I also got mine at BBB, but they don't seem to have the non-stick coating.

I've attempted this several times since my original post on the topic, and i've finally got it down. I do have to grease the rings with Crisco, but then i'm golden. I let them get almost done on one side, remove the ring, then flip to finish cooking. Goes pretty smoothly now. I even tried pouring some water in the pan for poaching, and that worked as well.

As for the folks who say they nuke eggs in the botton of a cup for this effect, i'm gonna hafta give the big thumbs down on that one. Tried it, didn't like the taste.

Bon
Print the post Back To Top