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We are hiking the high Sierra loop this summer.

If anyone has any advice or suggestions, my wife and I would appreciate it.

PF
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'We are hiking the high Sierra loop this summer. If anyone has any advice or suggestions, my wife and I would appreciate it." - PF


Don't get bit by a rattlesnake. I've watched a lot of cowboy movies and from them I've learned that there are deadly varmints everywhere up there, including the two legged kind! Be sure and take your six shooter with you! I recommend a Colt double action revolver because that is what cowboys use!

Art
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1. Don't skimp on the boots. All leather - no Goretex. Waterproof them. I like Vasque myself, but they fit my long skinny feet.

2. Hiking poles. You want a pair each. Get a set that breaks down into a shorter length. Three section poles are good. http://www.rei.com/product/831553/komperdell-compact-titanal...

3. Good rain gear. Coat and pants, plus one for your pack. Ponchos are OK for a one off, but not for serious weather.

4. Water purification filter

5. Start hiking now for conditioning

3. Have a great time.
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Congrats!

One recommendation -- if either of you are prone to altitude sickness, consider arriving a day before the hike.

I found out the need for this advice the hard way :-(
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Thanks, Volucris.

I should have mentioned to those who are not hikers that the High Sierra loop in Yosemite NP is so popular that to reserve campsites, hikers have to participate in a lottery.

We're in pretty good shape on the equipment. We will have to upgrade our packs. We have daypacks and will need something that can handle at least 4 days with sleeping bags. Taking a trip to the nearby REI this week. We won't have to worry about carrying food; the cooking will be done by the campgrounds' staff.

Being lowlanders, we've built a few days of day hikes into the beginning of the trip to acclimate to the altitude. We've been hiking 3-6 miles a day and we'll begin bumping that up as the weather improves and the date of the trip (end of July) approaches. The altitudes will be in the 7-10,000 foot range so we figure the temps will be anywhere from freezing to the 80s F.

PF
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We've always been very fortunate that we've adjusted quickly to altitude, but we've got a few days of day hikes built in to allow us to acclimate.

PF
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We have daypacks and will need something that can handle at least 4 days with sleeping bags. Taking a trip to the nearby REI this week.

I like Gregory packs - they have a suspension system that allows your back to breath. I have a Z35 day pack. I have an old Dana Designs back pack. If I didn't have that, I'd get a Gregory. Z65 is probably the size you want

http://www.gregorypacks.com/products/mens/technical/82/z-65#...

I can't recommend poles enough. Awesome hiking investment.
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LOne recommendation -- if either of you are prone to altitude sickness, consider arriving a day before the hike.

I found out the need for this advice the hard way :-(


Actually, if you really are prone you need more time than that. Part of the weakness you feel is your body going into overdrive trying to produce red blood cells. It some ways it is like recovering from an injury. You need a few days for that happen.

One old mountain bike racing trick for people who train at low elevations if you don't have time to acclimate is to show up immediately before the race so that does't happen.
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Thanks for the pack recommendation. I'll check it out. If REI doesn't carry it. We have another good hiking store that might. I've used a Dana daypack for probably 15 years.

I can't agree with you more about the hiking poles. My beaten up knees appreciate them on the downhill sections and my hips appreciate them on the uphills.

PF
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Being lowlanders, we've built a few days of day hikes into the beginning of the trip to acclimate to the altitude. We've been hiking 3-6 miles a day and we'll begin bumping that up as the weather improves and the date of the trip (end of July) approaches. The altitudes will be in the 7-10,000 foot range so we figure the temps will be anywhere from freezing to the 80s F.

PF


You folks realize that you are nuts, don't you?

Count No'Count
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Once you get your new packs, fill gallon milk jugs with water an load up your packs to the weight you'll be carrying (or a little more) while doing conditioning hikes. This has the virtue of being able to lighten your load quickly, by emptying a jug or two, if you need to.

FWIW: a gallon of water is 8 pounds.
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We're in pretty good shape on the equipment. We will have to upgrade our packs. We have daypacks and will need something that can handle at least 4 days with sleeping bags. Taking a trip to the nearby REI this week. We won't have to worry about carrying food; the cooking will be done by the campgrounds' staff.

I recommend contacting this guy about a pack:

http://www.mchalepacks.com/letter/index.htm

He's not cheap, but he makes by far the best packs you buy. I have two of them, and I've used them from Alaska to South America. He's kind of a curmudgeon and his website sucks, but his packs are legendary.
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One old mountain bike racing trick for people who train at low elevations if you don't have time to acclimate is to show up immediately before the race so that does't happen.

This might be the most awkward sentence I've ever written.
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