No. of Recommendations: 0
Well.... I'm not sure if being in bonds would have helped during the Great Depression... 
No idea what bonds were paying, but let's say a whopping 6% (which is probably way high)

So in a 75/25 split.... $300,000 in stocks, $100,000 in bonds.

$12,000 a year taken from stocks, $4,000 a year from bonds
(until the stock money runs out, at which point all $16,000 has to come from the bonds)

End of Year	DJIA	% change	Stocks	        Bonds
1928	        300		        $300,000	$100,000
1929	        248	82.67%	        $238,080	$102,000
1930	        164	66.13%	        $149,505	$104,120
1931	        78	47.56%	        $65,398	        $106,367
1932	        60	76.92%	        $41,076	        $108,749
1933	        100	166.67%	        $48,460	        $111,274
1934	        104	104.00%	        $37,918	        $113,951
1935	        144	138.46%	        $35,886	        $116,788
1936	        180	125.00%	        $29,858	        $119,795
1937	        121	67.22%	        $12,005	        $122,983
1938	        155	128.10%	        $6	        $126,362
1939	        150	96.77%		                $117,943
1940	        131	87.33%		                $109,020
1941	        111	84.73%		                $99,561
1942	        119	107.21%		                $89,535
1943	        136	114.29%		                $78,907
1944	        152	111.76%		                $67,641
1945	        193	126.97%		                $55,700
1946	        177	91.71%		                $43,042
1947	        181	102.26%		                $29,624
1948	        177	97.79%		                $15,402
1949	        200	112.99%		                $326
1950	        235	117.50%		
1951	        269	114.47%		
1952	        292	108.55%		
1953	        281	96.23%		
1954	        409	145.55%		
1955	        488	119.32%		
1956	        499	102.25%		
1957	        435	87.17%	

So you still run out of money after 20 years... And note it's just a straight $16k every year.
No increase for inflation in this model.

Thanks for the REHP link... I see they are using the S&P 500 instead of the Dow...

I wasn't able to easily find historical data on the S&P 500 going back to 1928..
Did it exist back then??

I did find this link

http://www.forecasts.org/data/data/sp500M.htm

which puts the S&P 500 at 17 in 1950. I don't know what it was in 1928.

I apologize for my harsh words before, and for the confrontational tone of even this post...

I just think all of us should know better than to ever use the word "certain" when 
dealing with the stock market.

However, I will examine the REHP in more depth... 
I do think most people who retired in December 1999 are not very re-assured by any historical 
models at this point, though... 
4% a year for the last 6 years has been leaving their accounts, and the stock market is still 
not where it was when they retired...


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