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What books have you read more than once? Fiction or non-fiction

A few come to mind immediately for me:

Skinny Legs and All & Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins
Several different Robert Heinlein books and stories
A Three Lord of the Rings


In the business arena:
* The One Minute Manger
* Good to Great by Jim Collins


Others will come to mind later...
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I read each of the Harry Potter books more than once: at least once by myself and then once with my kids.

I have gone back to read with my kids books that I enjoyed as a youth:
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
The Chronicles of Narnia books

I've read The Hobbit more than once (one time was with my older son).

I'm sure there are others, but those are what I can think of off the top of my head.

- KG
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Definitely Lord of the Rings. I have re-read that every 2 years or so since childhood.
Because I'm a teacher, I have read the (excellent) children's book "Holes" for at least 5 years in a row. I find something clever I didn't notice every time I read it.
I have read some Arthur Upfield mysteries more than once, but I enjoy those as a release.

I have read some Pynchon more than once because I didn't understand it the first time around.
I've read the Electric Kool Aid Acid Test more than once, and enjoyed it. Also "One flew over the cuckoo's nest," although once was for a class.
The Years by Virginia Woolf and another of her books.
I've read at least one Joseph Conrad novel twice.
In the Tennesse Country by Peter Taylor (and some of his short stories) and many Flannery O'Connor short stories.

This is a good idea for a thread, but I'm going to have to give it some thought and browse my bookshelf.
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Off the top of my head...

Into Thin Air by Krakauer
Millenium by Jacque Attali
Dracula
The Hobbit
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I cant even begin to write a comprehensive list...

Little Women
Little Men
Jo's Boys
Eight Cousins
Under the Lilacs
Rose in Bloom
The Forgotten Daughter
The Coming Down Time
Black Beauty
King of the Wind
The Black Stallion
The Last Unicorn
Beautiful Joe
White Ruff
Old Yeller
White Fang
Call of the Wild
Rabbit Hill
The Star Rover
The Outsiders
Wind in the Willows
Island of the Blue Dolphins
The Cricket in Times Square
Charlotte's Web
Caddie Woodlawn
My Side of the Mountain
A Wrinkle in Time
A Swiftly Tilting Planet
A Wind at the Door
Many Waters
From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler
The Chosen
The Promise
My Name is Asher Lev
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Robinson Crusoe
Watership Down
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
The Hobbit
Lord of the Rings
The Silmarilion (twice)
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Through the Looking Glass
The Jungle Books
Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH
The Never Ending Story
Animal Farm
Jonathon Livingston Seagull
Fluke
Flowers for Algernon
The Forgotten Door
The Education of Little Tree
The Adventures of Pinocchio
Podkayne of Mars
The Stand
The Talisman
Dark Half
Eyes of the Dragon
The Fountainhead
Anthem
Atlas Shrugged
The Count of Monte Cristo
Les Miserables
EVERYTHING by H. P. Lovecraft
Trixie Belden Books (original 26)
Chronicles of Narnia
Charlotte Sometimes
The Witch of Blackbird Pond
Stardust
Neverwhere
Sea Horse in the Sky
Overman Culture
When the Legends Die

That isnt even close to what I know I have read more than once...

Moonglade
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Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
Anything by Agatha Christie
Your Money or Your Life

Patricia Cornwall, Jonathon Kellerman, Faye Kellerman - I've started
to re-read all their novels, from first to latest.

I've been known to order books from the library that I have already read. I'll get halfway thru a book, and wonder why it seems so familiar.
I've come to the conclusion that if I read in bed until the wee hours, I don't retain what I am reading. Does anyone else have the same problem?

Peg
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I have to say, the One-Minute Manager is pretty horrid. I had a boss who tried to follow it, and the entire staff quit over a period of a year.
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If it's on my bookshelf, I'm going to end up reading it more then once. That's why I buy hardbacks. Currently rereading the Sword of Truth series.

Lara Amber
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OK, Moonglade,

What have you read more than 3 times?

:-)
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I have to say, the One-Minute Manager is pretty horrid. I had a boss who tried to follow it, and the entire staff quit over a period of a year.


I disagree. I think it is a great book to introduce the idea of actually letting people know what they are doing right and what they are doing wrong. That doesn't mean you should follow ANY book, or process, or procedure exactly as written and expect it to work well. As a source of ideas, it is a very simple book with some very simple ideas that way too many managers never even think about. Would I follow it to the letter? Not a chance. Does it have some very valuable information? Most definitely.
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What have you read more than 3 times?

:-)


Actually, most of the stuff on that list....

The Louisa May Alcott set of books were a hardback gift from my aunt and uncle and I read them repeatedly over the years, except for Jack and Jill which I disliked. That one I read twice. Nope, still didn't like it.

The myriad animal books (oops, just realized I should have added Brighty of the Grand Canyon), Trixie Belden books, and other standard classic kids literature were just a love of mine, and very enjoyable. They needed to be read repeatedly. :)

There were several books at my high school library that I checked out repeatedly over the four years I was there. I now own most of those books as well (and it wasn't always easy finding a copy!), since I loved them so much.

I was on a Stephen King as well as an Ayn Rand kick in early college, and read most of each author's stuff once a year for several years.

I brought two books with me on a four week trip to Russia in 1991 (The Talisman, and The Dark Half) and proceeded to read each one once a week for the next four weeks because there was nothing else in English to read! One of the other Americans on the trip took pity on me and lent me Clear and Present Danger. I can categorically state that that is one book I know that I have read only once. :)

I started reading at age 4 almost 5 (my sister was age 6 almost 7 and taught me what she learned each day at school so I had a headstart before there was a Headstart). I am now 44 and read at least 2-3 books a week. I read VERY fast. My sister takes 4 hours to read a book that I can read in 45 minutes. Once I get involved in a story, I want to know what happens, and I simply devour the book. First time I read Anthem, it was during a one hour dinner break while working at Monkee Wards in college, and I had time to discuss the book a bit with the fellow who'd lent it to me. First time I read Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, I stayed up til 3am to finish it.

Moonglade
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If it's on my bookshelf, I'm going to end up reading it more then once. That's why I buy hardbacks. Currently rereading the Sword of Truth series.

You have to try George R R Martin's series A Song of Fire and Ice, starting with A Game of Thrones. That is one set I own in hardback, others being the Pullman series His Dark Materials, and Jonathon Stroud's Bartimaeus trilogy.

Moonglade
(and those Louisa May Alcott books....)
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What have you read more than 3 times?

Actually, most of the stuff on that list....


I am impressed. I read a lot, but certainly not that fast. I usually consume about a book a week...and maybe another half a book on tape during my commute.


First time I read Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, I stayed up til 3am to finish it.

Those are ones that should be on my list as well. Those are two of my favorite books in the world. I periodically revisit them, but it's been a few years so they didn't jump to mind. I should revisit them again soon.

That also reminded me of another of my favorite sets of books...all the Sherlock Holmes stories by A. Conan Doyle. I have read the series through completely at least twice and several of the individual stories more than that.

I was recently told that the character "House" in the TV series of the same name was based on Sherlock Holmes. I had never seen it before, but started watching several of the episodes this season and have enjoyed it very much. I can definitely see Sherlock in the character from the attention to detail, to the love of the puzzle, to the chemical dependency when the puzzles aren't engaging enough. It's a good show.
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First time I read Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, I stayed up til 3am to finish it.

Those are ones that should be on my list as well. Those are two of my favorite books in the world. I periodically revisit them, but it's been a few years so they didn't jump to mind. I should revisit them again soon.


I have the Annotated Alice which has commentary about the original poetry that Lewis Carroll was satirizing, which political figures of the day are represented by which characters in the book, info about the Liddell girls and their family, where you are in the chess match at each point in the book (Looking Glass of course), etc. Primo stuff....

That also reminded me of another of my favorite sets of books...all the Sherlock Holmes stories by A. Conan Doyle. I have read the series through completely at least twice and several of the individual stories more than that.

Never was all that fond of mysteries. I did read all the Agatha Christies in high school but only once.

I was recently told that the character "House" in the TV series of the same name was based on Sherlock Holmes. I had never seen it before, but started watching several of the episodes this season and have enjoyed it very much. I can definitely see Sherlock in the character from the attention to detail, to the love of the puzzle, to the chemical dependency when the puzzles aren't engaging enough. It's a good show.

An excellent show even. I knew Hugh Laurie from his British comedy shows so I tend to spend time marveling at his American accent but he is a great actor and I can see the attention to detail and the addiction problem being reminiscent of Holmes. Once again, it sort of also shows Hollywood's inability to actually be original. :)

Moonglade
(been playing LOTRO more the last year than reading, sorry to say...)
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That also reminded me of another of my favorite sets of books...all the Sherlock Holmes stories by A. Conan Doyle. I have read the series through completely at least twice and several of the individual stories more than that.

Never was all that fond of mysteries. I did read all the Agatha Christies in high school but only once.


I am not a big fan of mysteries either, but there is something about Holmes that I always loved. I have a read a few other mysteries over the years. Some of them were amusing or interesting, but I can't even bring any to mind now. Never read Agatha Christie. That much I do remember.
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Already read the George RR Martin books and love them. Can't wait for the next one to be released.

Lara Amber
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I was recently told that the character "House" in the TV series of the same name was based on Sherlock Holmes. I had never seen it before, but started watching several of the episodes this season and have enjoyed it very much. I can definitely see Sherlock in the character from the attention to detail, to the love of the puzzle, to the chemical dependency when the puzzles aren't engaging enough. It's a good show.



Law & Order: Criminal Intent is along those same lines. And of course, the Jeremy Brett portrayal of Holmes on the PBS series of the 80s and 90s was the first time the actual stories of Doyle were put on film. Brett did a great job over a ten-year period, despite the periodic obstacles of his wife's death, a nervous breakdown, and impending heart failure.
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Almost forgot Shaara's Killer Angels. Have read that three times now, I think.
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Almost forgot Shaara's Killer Angels. Have read that three times now, I think.

I read that once and listened to the books on tape version once... I guess that qualifies
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The Chronicles of Narnia:

* The Lion, the Witch & The Wardrobe
* Prince Caspian
* The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
* The Silver Chair
* The Horse & His Boy
* The Magician's Nephew
* The Last Battle

I have read all 7 books every summer since 1981. (And yes, I can quote entire passages from them by now!)

I still find them magical.
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Harry Potter books twice.
The Road, by Cormac McCarthy

~Birgit
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Green Eggs and Ham. Seriously! I have a son who will turn two in 12 days, and I (usually) read him a book or two every night before bed. If one of them isn't Green Eggs and Ham he's not a happy camper! He likes the train (or perhaps it's me going "Chugga-chugga-chugga-chugga WOO WOO! when he points to it...)

As for "books" The Hobbit is definitely on the list, as is Atlas Shrugged and The Stand. I mostly read non-fiction (I was a history major for a reason!) but as a kid I read the Hobbit over and over and over again. I never read any of the LOTR books until after I saw the movies interestingly enough...

/Yes, I do have "nice" copy of The Hobbit that will no doubt be my son's one day, and maybe his son's too God willing.
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Just like LaraAmber said, if it is on my bookshelf, chances are I have read it more than once. I get a book and if I like it, I put it on my shelf. If not, I pass it on to someone else or give it to the local library for their book fair. Also, if I like one book by an author, I will read almost all the books by that author. My favorites (but not the whole list):
Mark Twain
Tom Clancy
Dale Brown
Dan Brown
James Rollings
Patrick Robinson
CS Lewis
Jon Land
Jim Butcher
JK Rowling
JRR Tolkien
Robert Ludlum
Agatha Christie
Len Deighton
Robert Dahl
John Grisham
Sidney Sheldon
Matthew Reilly
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a great list. I would add Ed McBain aka Evan Hunter ("Blackboard Jungle" fame) for his 87th Precinct series.
And Michael Connelly with his Harry Bosch series.
Julie Smith had a few interesting "Detective Skip Langdon" books awhile back, but I don't know if whe is still writing.




BK
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