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No. of Recommendations: 7
What does the dealer say according to Honda's published service procedure? If Honda suggests turning rotors rather than replacing along with pads there will be a minimum thickness specification. If they are turned below that they are much more likely to warp and not be able to dissipate the heat from friction.

It sounds like you are getting different answers because no one is actually comparing apples to apples.

In all likelihood, both jobs will probably be very similar in price. With one you have a higher parts cost with less labor, but the other a higher labor cost with fewer parts. I would probably lean toward replacing the rotors with the pads, especially with that mileage, even if Honda's specification says they can be turned safely.
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No. of Recommendations: 7
What does the dealer say according to Honda's published service procedure? If Honda suggests turning rotors rather than replacing along with pads there will be a minimum thickness specification. If they are turned below that they are much more likely to warp and not be able to dissipate the heat from friction.

It sounds like you are getting different answers because no one is actually comparing apples to apples.

In all likelihood, both jobs will probably be very similar in price. With one you have a higher parts cost with less labor, but the other a higher labor cost with fewer parts. I would probably lean toward replacing the rotors with the pads, especially with that mileage, even if Honda's specification says they can be turned safely.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
After 75k miles, it is time to replace the discs.
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The brake rotors/disks should have the minimum thickness allowable stamped onto their hubs.

I would turn them only if...

1. They are currently still thicker than that (which I expect to be the case at only 75k miles, with the usual blend of casual highway/city driving), and...

2. There is some obvious need to try doing so, such as a vibration in the brakes.

And with all the possible problems associated with turning well-used rotors, I think I would just replace them with new instead, again only if they have reached the minimum thickness. Otherwise I would leave them alone.

xtn
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Not needing brakes done until 75K miles sounds perfectly normal to me.

Turning the rotors might cause them to warp, which will cause a pulsing or shudder during braking. If you have no shudder now, it would be preferable to not turn the rotors, but in my experience, most shops will refuse this request.

Be aware that if you replace the rotors at an independent shop, they are likely to give you a non-OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer, i.e. Honda) part, since it's cheaper. Unfortunately, you may wind up with a warped rotor in this case too, since non-OEM parts often don't exactly conform to the manufacturer's standards.

I've experienced both problems. Replacing the rotors with new Honda rotors will give you the best chance of a trouble free outcome. An independent shop will put on new Honda rotors if you ask, you don't have to go to the dealer for this.
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Thanks all for your input. I appreciate all your responses.
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Turning the rotors might cause them to warp

Rotor warping is a little bit complicated. I learned all of this the hard way. It is possible to warp any rotor. Obviously all of the heat is generated on the faces of the rotor, but the rotor mass is nearly evenly distributed through its thickness. As the rotor face heats up, it will attempt to expand, but the cooler material deeper in the thickness of the rotor resists this expansion. This conflict of expansion causes stress in the rotor, which can cause it to warp. It takes the heat some time to travel through the thickness of the rotor, which will reduce the stress.

The first brake application in a while is a lot harder on the rotors than the second one is. Panic braking is the most likely to warp a rotor due to the high rate of heat input. Drag racing can be just as bad because the brakes are stone cold at the finish line. Carbon rotors save drag racers a lot of money because the carbon material has a coefficient of thermal expansion that is very near zero, so the rotors and pads (made from the same material) are impervious to thermal shock.

Neil
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Fireballs,

I think it should be pointed out that a high percentage of "warped" rotors (or rotors that the driver THINKS are warped) aren't actually warped at all. Rather, they have developed hard spots in the steel, or possibly just have pad material built up on them unevenly.

Also, somebody else said that non-OEM rotors can be cheaper and inferior to OEM rotors. So I would like to point out that not ALL non-OEM rotors can be described that way. There are SOME non-OEM rotors made to higher standards than OEM. Sure, they aren't likely to be installed by Brakes-R-Us or similar shop, but they are available.

On my Exige I use an aftermarket steel rotor that is NOT drilled or slotted, has non-directional venting vanes, and the disk is mounted on an aluminum hat, and they are lighter in weight. I have found them to be quite superior to the OEM units that came with the car, with regards to consistency of feel and life expectancy. Not surprisingly they are more expensive though.
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