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Does anyone know the times involved. Is it the end of this year, the next or the financial year?

Thanks,

Simon
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<<Does anyone know the times involved. Is it the end of this year, the next or the financial year?>>

Simon --

I'm not sure there's any universal answer. Usually if a price target is given, a time frame is also supplied. For example...

[hmm...]

The first example I pulled from a random news search is this:

<<NEW YORK, Sept 30 (Reuters) - Credit Suisse First Boston said Thursday it is starting finance and transportation company GATX Corp. <GMT.N> with a buy rating and setting a $46 per share price target. >>

So no time frame there.

Another example:

<<NEW YORK, Sept 30 (Reuters) - Lehman Brothers said on Thursday it raised AmSouth Bancorp to buy from outperform. ... Lehman's 12-month price target of $30 assumes a current regional bank composite multiple of 15.6 times the 2000 estimate, implying upside of 29 percent from current levels. >>

This one does include the time frame.

Selena
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Selena,
I had a question similar to the original one, but your answer doesn't really tell me what I'm trying to find out. Here's a specific example: Today, Lehman Brothers set a 12 month price target for Intel (INTC) of $175 a share. My question is, do they mean that they expect INTC shares to be $175 exactly 12 months from today (i.e., June 19, 2001)? Or do they mean December 31, 2000? Or some other date entirely? Please be specific, if possible....I am a total fool! <g>
Thanks!
Laurel


<<Does anyone know the times involved. Is it the end of this year, the next or the financial year?>>

Simon --

I'm not sure there's any universal answer. Usually if a price target is given, a time frame is also supplied. For example...

[hmm...]

The first example I pulled from a random news search is this:

<<NEW YORK, Sept 30 (Reuters) - Credit Suisse First Boston said Thursday it is starting finance and transportation
company GATX Corp. <GMT.N> with a buy rating and setting a $46 per share price target. >>

So no time frame there.

Another example:

<<NEW YORK, Sept 30 (Reuters) - Lehman Brothers said on Thursday it raised AmSouth Bancorp to buy from
outperform. ... Lehman's 12-month price target of $30 assumes a current regional bank composite multiple of 15.6 times the
2000 estimate, implying upside of 29 percent from current levels. >>

This one does include the time frame.

Selena
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Laurel --

<<I had a question similar to the original one, but your answer doesn't really tell me what I'm trying to find out. Here's a specific example: Today, Lehman Brothers set a 12 month price target for Intel (INTC) of $175 a share. My question is, do they mean that they expect INTC shares to be $175 exactly 12 months from today (i.e., June 19, 2001)? Or do they mean December 31, 2000? Or some other date entirely? Please be specific, if possible....I am a total fool! <g>>>

Well, I'm not 100% sure (but I'm pretty sure) -- so anyone who thinks diffrently is more than welcome to weigh in with additional thoughts.

I think that if they set a 12-month target, they mean 12 months from now. This stuff can't really be that precise, though, so I wouldn't be thinking about any exact day. If I hear "12-month target", I just think it's roughly a year away. Of course, often times when a report like this is issued, the market gets excited and bids the stock up to the target in very short order... which some might cynically think was the point of the target report in the first place.

Selena
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