No. of Recommendations: 2
What's super great about TJ's?

In my area and for what I usually buy, Trader Joe's is consistently lower in price and the same to better in quality. For example, we buy zucchini and yellow squash year-round. When we buy it at Trader Joe's, it is packaged in "16 ounce" packages. However, they tend to actually weight more than that, with some variation so it's worth comparing packages. The price works out to be considerably less than I pay at other markets for the same amount.

Their potatoes, as a second example, taste better than the potatoes I get at our regular store. They are creamier, cook a little more quickly, and just... taste better.

The chicken sausage that's comparable to Aidell's is a dollar or so less per package. The eggs are $0.50 a dozen less than the other store.

The grass-fed beef that we get there (frozen) is more expensive than the regular ground beef at the grocery store, but far less than the grass-fed organic beef at other places.

I've found the difference to be consistent enough that we save a few dollars every time we go there rather than other places. We have gradually shifted most of our shopping to Trader Joe's, particularly now that we don't have easy access to the Amish country store where we used to do all our bulk shopping.

ThyPeace, also, I really like the Montezuma 100% dark chocolate. I would say that's just me, but they keep increasing the amount they carry, so it's probably not just me.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
What's super great about TJ's?

They have many custom items you can't get anywhere else. And they are innovators -- they were one of the first to offer frozen riced cauliflower and Halo Top ice cream. I remember stories about people fighting crowds to get what they had in stock at the time, and then being told it would be out-of-stock for months because the supply line just wasn't in place to meet the unexpected volume of the demand.

I haven't been there for years. It was almost impossible to find a parking spot in their lot. And some a-holes would stand/park in the handicapped spots (which we needed for wheelchair access) because "I'm waiting for someone".

I would buy some of their items from Amazon, except that the prices there are at least double the prices in the store. And that would exclude any frozen items. I don't see them as an available merchant on Doordash or Grubhub or Ubereats or ...

Trader Joe's has an active Reddit community:

https://www.reddit.com/r/traderjoes/
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No. of Recommendations: 5
So...what am I missing? What's super great about TJ's?

</snip>


I went there once, looked around, and haven't been back. I prefer to to my grocery shopping at real supermarkets.

intercst
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No. of Recommendations: 2
What's super great about TJ's?

In my area and for what I usually buy, Trader Joe's is consistently lower in price and the same to better in quality. For example, we buy zucchini and yellow squash year-round. When we buy it at Trader Joe's, it is packaged in "16 ounce" packages. However, they tend to actually weight more than that, with some variation so it's worth comparing packages. The price works out to be considerably less than I pay at other markets for the same amount.

Their potatoes, as a second example, taste better than the potatoes I get at our regular store. They are creamier, cook a little more quickly, and just... taste better.

The chicken sausage that's comparable to Aidell's is a dollar or so less per package. The eggs are $0.50 a dozen less than the other store.

The grass-fed beef that we get there (frozen) is more expensive than the regular ground beef at the grocery store, but far less than the grass-fed organic beef at other places.

I've found the difference to be consistent enough that we save a few dollars every time we go there rather than other places. We have gradually shifted most of our shopping to Trader Joe's, particularly now that we don't have easy access to the Amish country store where we used to do all our bulk shopping.

ThyPeace, also, I really like the Montezuma 100% dark chocolate. I would say that's just me, but they keep increasing the amount they carry, so it's probably not just me.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
So...what am I missing?

I am in the same boat as you. Lots of folks rave about it, but there is very little that I find there. I do like their pumpkin jam that they have in the Fall and which I cannot figure out how to make, and I use their 21 Seasoning Salute on everything, but that’s it.

Most of the folks I know who love it buy a lot of prepared foods, and I don’t use that sort of thing.
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No. of Recommendations: 15
I don't buy all my groceries there, but I consistently return for a few chosen items I wouldn't (and couldn't) buy in any super market.

What I do find exceptional is their customer service. There's never a line at the checkouts because if there's more than one person in line at any of them, they immediately open another one. You can approach any of their workers with any question (from do you carry xxx item, to where do I find yyy item) and get a prompt, immediate answer. It's like a family owned store where the proprietor's children had been raised since early childhood to value customers. I admire efficiency and Trader Joe's has it.

RayB
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No. of Recommendations: 0
They have many custom items you can't get anywhere else.

I get this.

I remember stories about people fighting crowds to get what they had in stock at the time


This I don't get.


If a company is offering your quality and value, then I understand customer loyalty. But, getting into fights? That's cult like behavior.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
"I went there once, looked around, and haven't been back. I prefer to to my grocery shopping at real supermarkets." - intercst
--------------------


I've been to Trader Joe's once. Looked like a grocery store for single people.

It wasn't me. I buy big chunks of meat and finish cutting them up myself and stash them in the freezer.

Haven't been back.

Art
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No. of Recommendations: 0
"Most of the folks I know who love it buy a lot of prepared foods, and I don’t use that sort of thing." - 2gifts


Me either. A few months ago I bought a whole lamb from a couple at our church who raise sheep and butchered it myself. Also a guy at church who deer hunts gave me a deer that I cut up and put in the freezer. I buy a lot of fresh produce and cook it or make salads, but I don't buy little all ready cut up produce, I buy bit stuff that I have to process myself.

Art
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No. of Recommendations: 0
If a company is offering your quality and value, then I understand customer loyalty. But, getting into fights? That's cult like behavior.

They were brand new products, highly desired, and not available anywhere else. Nothing to do with loyalty. For the first few months, any time the frozen riced cauliflower was stocked, the shipment was gone within a few hours. For a long time, they limited purchases to two bags per customer.

From 2015:

https://www.popsugar.com/food/Best-New-Trader-Joe-Products-J...

Every month, Trader Joe's comes out with a slew of new products, featured in the company's Fearless Flyer. We're picking up the new products, tasting them, and ranking them from best to worst, so you know which ones are worth putting in your basket and which ones to skip. This June, five cheese Greek spiral, cauliflower rice, chicken balti pies, and peanut butter and jelly Greek yogurt are just a few unexpected things you won't want to miss at Trader Joe's. Read on for the complete list.
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No. of Recommendations: 0
For the first few months, any time the frozen riced cauliflower was stocked, the shipment was gone within a few hours.


That I don't understand either. Put that on my plate instead of a nice steak, and we will be fighting.
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No. of Recommendations: 4
Put [riced cauliflower] on my plate instead of a nice steak, and we will be fighting.

It's not a replacement for the steak. It's a low carb replacement for rice or potatoes or grits or mac and cheese or a risotto or a pilaf or...

The low carb eaters will definitely keep that steak on the plate. A nice thick cut. :)
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No. of Recommendations: 6
I love love love Trader Joe's. It is my first stop on a shopping day. After I have taken my free coffee and their daily sample of whatever, with thanks..

First I choose my flowers for the week, which DH can no longer bring on Fridays, as he has done most of our married life,...then for a typical week I go to the veggies...lovely Brussels sprouts ready to go, fat green peppers, pick up a lettuce ( I still grow my own tomatoes,) an English cucumber,onions/celery/carrots for soup, some fruit that looks good, a small crisp loaf of bread, and then on to cold cuts...their prosciutto, some salami, cheeses, chicken/apple sausage and then to the riced cauliflower with veggies, the Chinese pork buns, the pea and carrot patties, and finally, for DH, tiny chocolate filled crepes, and some coffee ice-cream.

As you know, we live in an Old People's Home with three excellent restaurants with menus that change every day,(60 meals a month is part of our monthly dues) but I love cooking, so although I don't belong to the cooking club here, I do a couple of meals a week. TJs has fabulous prepared meals but I prefer to cook my own stuff...

Consider me a fan of TJ's
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No. of Recommendations: 2
Trader Joe's is my main grocery store. The biggest reason I shop there is price. When I switched to them, my grocery bill dropped by about 20%.

I think if you mostly buy fancy prepared foods there, they seem expensive and not worth it. But I buy mostly produce, grains, beans, soy milk, and nut butters. The flour is $2 a pound lower than the equivalent grocery store package. The soy milk is $1-2 less per package. The produce is usually much less. Plus they have these tiny avocados which are just enough for one person. My son is the only one who eats them now that I am allergic, so it reduces waste for him to eat a whole one in one sitting, rather than half a larger avocado inevitably gong bad.

There are some down sides. Most of their stuff is lower in preservatives, so the bread molds faster than grocery store bread. That means you either have to eat it faster, or buy bread elsewhere. And they don't carry everything.

So usually I plan my menu for the week, go to trader joe's and get what I can there, and then the next day go to a different store to get the rest.

DEG
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No. of Recommendations: 0
If you try to replace my fully loaded baked potato with frozen rice cauliflower, we will be fighting too.

(clearly it will have to be short fight because immediately after it, I will be having a heart attack)
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No. of Recommendations: 0
The flour is $2 a pound lower than the equivalent grocery store package.

</snip>


I don't buy a lot of flour, but Winco has a barrel of the stuff in the corner where you can scoop out what you need for about 75 cents/lb.

https://www.wincofoods.com/shop#/?q=flour

intercst
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Trader Joe's, explained:

http://freakonomics.com/podcast/trader-joes/

IMO, this is a great explanation why the do most everything the opposite of conventional wisdom for supermarkets...but (IIRC) have the highest profit per square foot of all grocery stores.

Mike
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No. of Recommendations: 0
So...what am I missing? What's super great about TJ's?

Probably varies by the size of the store. The local TJ's is small. Half the store is wine. I tried to find something that my DIL buys at her local TJ's and it isn't my local store.
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The flour is $2 a pound lower than the equivalent grocery store package.

</snip>

I don't buy a lot of flour, but Winco has a barrel of the stuff in the corner where you can scoop out what you need for about 75 cents/lb.

https://www.wincofoods.com/shop#/?q=flour


The price I pay for a 5 lb bag works out to just a little bit less than the Winco price, and I bake a ton, so I genuinely need a 5 lb bag.

But until 6 weeks ago, there was no Winco near me anyway. The other stores that have bulk food sections near me tend to be over priced. So that's probably another factor in whether or not people like a given store. It depends on what else is around.

Now that there is a Winco near me, my shopping habits may change.

DEG
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No. of Recommendations: 1
It’s the small footprint and cool factor thing.

The only one near me is 20 miles away and too far out for me to visit, same thing for Whole Paycheck, clear on the other side of town. I have visited both. What I noticed at TJ’s is the wine selection and junk foods...albeit more healthier...and other things that I don’t eat, so even if they were up the street I wouldn’t shop there.

Lucky Dog
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"But I buy mostly produce, grains, beans, soy milk, and nut butters." - 1DEG


You had me snickering and rolling on the floor. Soy milk and nut butters! LOL!

It just goes to prove that humans can eat pretty much anything and still survive. We are completely flexible in our ability to consume almost anything and still survive and flourish.


Art
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No. of Recommendations: 0
"I don't buy a lot of flour, but Winco has a barrel of the stuff in the corner where you can scoop out what you need for about 75 cents/lb." https://www.wincofoods.com/shop#/?q=flour
intercst

-------------


Krogers and Walmart have a whole isle full of different fours and you can buy a 4 lb bag of the stuff for between $1.69 to $1.99 depending on what kind you need. Flour is pretty much pure starch and cheap as hell. That is why when you go out to eat restaurants want to fill you up on bread stuffs.

Art
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No. of Recommendations: 3
You had me snickering and rolling on the floor. Soy milk and nut butters! LOL!

And here I thought peanut butter was a fairly common LBYM food recommendation. Who knew it was so exotic and amusing.

DEG
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Mike, here
https://boards.fool.com/trader-joe39s-explained-34137136.asp...

links to a freakonomics article about TJ's.
I found the article rather interesting. Thanks, Mike! 😀

Here's one such interesting fact:
TJ is owned by one of the Aldi brothers (Aldi store chains). I would never have thought that! The Aldi's experience is SO different from TJ's. TJ was bought by the Aldi bro.

Here's another: TJ focuses on customer satisfaction through customer service. !!! The LACK of "service" at other stores turns me off... So, I think this is a big factor for TJ's success?


🙂
ralph
My dental office has workers EVERYWHERE. There is always someone available to "help". After reading the TJ's article, I thought that the dental company must also have a customer service/satisfaction goal. I get the NPS surveys from them, after every visit.
It's a dental management company with three or four locations and 3-4 dentists per location, and a BUNCH of workers, each specializing in some skill.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Yeah, I knew TJ’s was owned by Aldi. Frankly, I like shopping at Aldi a lot. And TJ’s is okay, but it’s across town for me, and the store feels too busy and too cramped and I have just not been seeing the worth of traveling over there. Their produce, to me, is pretty on par with Aldi, and I have a Sprouts, a Whole Paycheck, and two Krogers very close to me.

So sounds like I’m not missing out on too much by only slipping into TJs once in a while. I have tried a couple of their special things, and I will admit their carrot cake spread rocked my world in the fall, so hopefully that'll come around again.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
What's super great about TJ's?

Well, there was the cheap wine. In CO, that could only be one store and wasn't the one near me. I like their chili sauce and jicama sticks. I go to the one near the good bagel place and maybe only once every couple of months. They can now sell full-strength beer in all of their stores(as of Jan 1) so I suspect they will become even more profitable here. When we didn't have one in state, I also liked to stock up on almonds there. For me, I have a Sprouts that's closer. And closer still(walkable) is Kroger.

I know it is my adult son's preferred store - I think because there's a big one near where he works and it has very fresh produce because it's a very busy one.

I wouldn't say either of us is a fanatic.
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No. of Recommendations: 9
Back when I was in college in the '70s I discovered the original Trader Joe's store in South Pasadena, CA. Its major attraction to a student was cheap prices on wine and cheese. Also, a variety of other things, and I didn't much go for wine, but the cheese was a big deal. Getting bleu or an imported brie for half the price (and better quality) that the supers made it possible to eat better food. Here's their timeline: https://www.traderjoes.com/our-story/timeline. Today, the combination of cheap and good is still TJ's hallmark.

When my wife and I moved away from SoCal to start a family, the only limitation on location we had was that there had to be a Trader Joe's within reasonable driving distance. By that time we did most of our food shopping there. As confirmed LBYMers we found it difficult to buy cheese anywhere else.

Nowadays we shop for food primarily at TJ's, with the produce store next door as a backup. Then Costco for some bulk stuff (like 50 lb. bags of bread flour for baking, at less than $0.25/lb.). It's all good. And the free samples at TJ's and Costco make my day -- there's nothing that tastes better than good free food.

We were worried when Joe Coulombe retired, but have been quite pleased that TJ's has remained true to its roots despite being owned by an international conglomerate. The high quality and great deals continue, especially on wine, cheese, and chocolate. Not only do they have Valrhona chocolate bars, but I suspect their Pound Plus bar (identified as imported from Belgium) is actually made by Callebaut, since it melts so beautifully and tastes great.

-IGU-
(still cheap, and happy to have brought up cheap kids who also shop at TJ's)
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No. of Recommendations: 13
MissEdithKeeler: So...what am I missing? What's super great about TJ’s?
===========================

While I fully acknowledge and respect your anecdotal dis-satisfaction with Traders Joe’s as a shopper (along with Art, intercst and others), I’ll address your questions from an investor’s perspective.

In the U.S., Theo Albrecht (deceased since 2010) owned the Trader Joe's specialty grocery store chain. His brother Karl Albrecht owned the Aldi Süd discount supermarket chain that operates the Aldi groceries in the U. S. Aldi and Trader Joe's, while owned by the brothers, have separate and distinct ownership and operations. Aldi is not traded on any stock markets. It is a private company that to date has not revealed any IPO plans for getting fresh money on the market. If they need to get cash for expansion, they most likely will do it under private investment.

I, however, am praying/dying for the day when the Trader Joe’s entity goes public. If it ever goes public, the opening price will most likely skyrocket to record heights. Why? What's super great about TJ’s? Tons of highly satisfied, loyal customers, quality products, favorable retail prices, and positive upbeat market and financial data and analyses.

According to the latest 2018 dunnhumby’s retailer preference index, quality and price has propelled Trader Joe’s to the top.
https://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Article/2018/01/16/Trader-...

RETAILER PREFERENCE INDEX (RPI) RANKINGS
Based on online survey data from 11,000 U.S. households, coupled with financial performance data that validate what dunnhumby has been saying for years, I.e., “the most customer-centric retailers perform the best financially.”

Top Quartile:

1 Trader Joe’s
2 Costco
3 Amazon
4 H-E-B
5 Walmart
6 Wegmans
7 Aldi
8 Sam’s Club
9 Sprouts Farmers Market
10 Whole FoodsMarket
11 Walmart Neighborhood
12 Market Basket
13 WinCo

2nd Quartile
14 Meijer
15 BJs Wholesale
16 Publix
17 King Soopers
18 Kroger
19 Harris Teeter
20 Target
21 Hy-Vee
22 Fred Meyer
23 Stater Bros.
24 Smith’s Food & Drug
25 Hannaford
26 Stop & Shop
27 Food4LessFoods Co.

==========================

Back in 2014, I made a TMF post at Saul’s Investing Discussions message board about Sprouts Farmers Market as a potential investment candidate and back then included the following comments about Trader Joe’s as a privately held competitor.
https://boards.fool.com/sprouts-a-lot-of-food-for-thought-31...

COMPETITION & GROWTH

Whole Foods pioneered the natural and organic food segment that it still dominates, but recently investors worry that it could lose more share to specialty retailers such as Sprouts, Fresh Market, National Grocers and Trader Joe's, as well as mainstream retailers such as Kroger, Albertsons (which merged with Safeway) and Wal-Mart Stores.

IMO, the most formidable competitor in the natural and organic arena is Trader Joe’s which has successfully gone head-to-head with Whole Foods over the years. Trader Joe’s substantially outpaces its competitors in sales per square foot as shown in following table from survey research conducted by real estate investment firm JLL in 2014:

Average Sales
per Sq. Ft.

TRADER JOE’S $1,723


WHOLE FOODS 937
Publix 552
Kroger 496
SPROUTS 490
FRESH MARKET 443
Harris Teeter 442
NATURAL GROCERS 419
Roundy’s 393
Weis Markets 335
Ingles 325

At a whopping $1,734 sales per square foot, Trader Joe’s sells almost twice as much as Whole Foods and leaves Sprouts, Fresh Market and Natural Grocers behind in the dust. Trader Joe’s currently has 446 stores with an average size between 8,000 and 12,000 square feet versus Whole Foods' 400 stores with an average gross area of 38,000 square feet.

Here’s the geographic distribution by State for Whole Foods, Sprouts, Fresh Market, National Grocers and Trader Joe’s.

Company Whole Sprouts Fresh National Trader
Location Foods Market Grocers Joe’s

California 79 84 0 172
Texas 28 35 6 13 16
Arizona 11 29 4 14
Colorado 20 27 34 7
Oregon 8 8 12
New Mexico 4 6 5 3
Nevada 5 5 1 7
Utah 5 5 2 2
Montana 4
Idaho 1 3 1
Nebraska 2 3 2
Wyoming 2
Washington 8 1 21
Florida 25 40 15
N. Carolina 12 19 9
Virginia 10 13 14
Georgia 10 7 12 7
Illinois 24 9 21
Tennessee 5 2 8 2
S. Carolina 4 7 3
Ohio 6 6 6
Alabama 1 3 6
Indiana 3 5 2
New York 16 4 21
Pennsylvania 10 4 10
Maryland 9 4 8
Louisiana 5 4 1
Kentucky 2 3 4
New Jersey 13 3 11
Connecticut 9 2 7
Wisconsin 2 2 3
Kansas 4 3 2 8 1
Arkansas 1 2 2
Oklahoma 3 7 1 5
Iowa 1 1 1
Mississippi 1 1
N. Hampshire 1 1 2
Massachusetts 30 1 18
Michigan 6 6
Minnesota 6 8
Missouri 2 2 5
D.C, 4 2
Rhode Island 3 1
Maine 1 1
Vermont 1
Delaware 1
Hawaii 3

Total 400 215 166 95 446

Privately-held Trader Joe’s is a formidable competitor in this arena. Renowned for its quirky personality and unique products, Trader Joe’s is a chain of specialty grocery stores at 446 locations in 39 states and Washington, D.C. The company will open soon 11 new stores at the following locations: 1 store in Birmingham, Alabama; 3 in Texas (2 in Dallas and 1 in Houston); 2 in Florida (Davie & Ft. Lauderdale); 1 in Grand Rapids, Michigan; 2 in Washington (Shoreline & Spokane); and 1 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Store sizes average between 8,000 and 12,000 square feet that support and carry fewer than 4,000 items, about which 80% are private label. The company’s greatest edge over conventional chains is the fact that consumers cannot get its items anywhere else. This unique positioning serves as a powerful marketing tool and is effective at insulating the company from competition. According to Supermarket News data, Trader Joe’s 2013 sales were at $11.3 billion, compared to the leader Whole Foods at $12.9 billion.

According to Consumer data from Simmons National Consumer Surveys from Experian Marketing Services:

• Consumers for Trader Joe’s and Whole Food tend to have a higher education; are conscious of labels, ingredients, nutrition, and eating healthfully; interested in natural/organic products, gourmet foods, foreign foods, and the way food is presented; and concerned about environmental issues.

• At Whole Foods, the focus is premium quality and huge selection. At Trader Joe’s, the focus is a sharply edited assortment of great products at great prices.

• There is also a vast difference in their marketing thrusts. Whole Foods promotes the concept that by buying products at its stores, consumers are supporting not just organic foods, but a production model that benefits local farmers, people in third-world countries, and the environment. In contrast, the marketing thrust of Trader Joe’s is that it is here to make shopping fun—and has great products that it searched the world to find just for you, at prices that are a steal.
--------------------------

Since my 2014 TMF post, Trader Joe’s continued to expand rapidly nationwide. While almost everybody in Southern California knows about the Trader Joe’s name brand, there’s a hurdle to overcome when entering and expanding in new out-of-state markets, Trader Joe’s appears to be on the right track so far. Whole Foods decided to target Trader Joe’s market and customers by developing smaller footprint, off-beat “hipper” stores; however, these plans were disrupted by Amazon’s acquisition of the company.

================

Now how does this relate to LBYM? Food price and shopping-wise, Trader Joe’s is a highly competitive lower price alternative to Amazon/Whole Foods. The beauty is if you dislike either one, there’s a vast number of other choices. Since my 2014 post, almost everybody in my neck of the woods in Southern California is jumping on the home delivery bandwagon, e.g., Costco, Von’s/Albertson’s, Trader Joe’s via Postmates, AmazonFresh, yummy.com and Instacart among others. Don’t like to cook your own meals, there’s a huge array of alternatives from home-delivered prepared meals to home-delivered restaurant meals via the likes of GrubHub and Uber.

In my local area of Los Angeles County, I have a Costco store, Sprouts, WinCo and Trader Joe’s within 10 minutes drive from my home and a Von’s within a 1/2 mile walking distance. My usual food shopping ritual is first to stop at Costco to buy the bulk of my fresh perishable meats, seafood (wild salmon, wild mahimahi, no farm raised fish), vegetable, fruit and dairy items, We also shop a lot at numerous nearby Asian markets in Rowland Heights-Walnut for fresh wild whole fish and a wide selection of fresh Asian vegetables, Asian fruits and wide selection of California grown brown and white rice. My wife and I also like to shop at Sprouts for fresh perishables. Traditional supermarket chains like Von's have quickly wised up and matched their competitors in quality and prices and offer smaller quantities. My wife and I occasionally shop at the local Trader Joe's for smaller packaged items. Am I satisfied and content with all this surrounding convenience? Darn right! What am I missing? Trade Joe’s IPO!

Regards,
Ray
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I saw imuafool's reply post on Best of. I just glanced at it because WOW that's a lot of info.

What is funny and why I am replying: Art who doesn't like Trader Joes shops a little at Sprouts for his wife. I think it is fairly new in Middle Tennessee.

Also, BTW I have shopped at Aldi in Germany and other places in Europe. They have Trader Joe products. Not a ton, but several different items. So obviously they have a presence in other places.

Last point: I have a Trader Joes close to my house but don't go often. Still, if I want something which I consider good quality not easy to find elsewhere, I stop by there. For instance, they have really nice bar soap. And my daughter wanted some products not easily found as cheap in town which she was taking to her overseas home (right now, China). I think she spent about $90 at Christmas which included some gifts for some of her friends in China (e.g., essential oils likely a lot more expensive in the other "natural" food stores in town).
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"What is funny and why I am replying: Art who doesn't like Trader Joes shops a little at Sprouts for his wife. I think it is fairly new in Middle Tennessee." Lindytoes
------------------------------


I've been to Trader Joe's over by Green Hills in Nashville. It's a kind of high falutin ritzy part of Nashville. There is no doubt they got some good delicious stuff and I'm sure I'd enjoy eating it only it's a little too posh for my tastes and I thought the prices were a bit high compared to the low rent places I normally shop. I go to one store that sells going out of date stuff and close-out stuff and it is cheap only like one lady said to me yesterday "you got to watch the expiration dates." Not that I care about expiration dates too much?

Remember I'm the guy that worked at the UT Vet Hospital and used high powered hoses to clean animal manure which got volitized up in the air and then we'd breath it in and I'm pretty sure I probably ate at least 2 tablespoons of dog and cat manure every day so I got a high functioning immune system.

Catch my drift? I don't worry about a lot of stuff that normal people worry about. Most of the meat I buy has "manager special" stickers on it and is either closed to or completely out of date.

Art
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"worked at the UT Vet Hospital and used high powered hoses to clean animal manure which got volitized up in the air and then we'd breath it in and I'm pretty sure I probably ate at least 2 tablespoons of dog and cat manure every day so I got a high functioning immune system."

**************************************************************

There are a lot of articles written about drug-resistance and water
contamination - which some have suggested as a cause to what
appears as an increase in childhood and adult allergies.

Most grocery stores go through cycles where they are managed well and
then decline over time. Buildings age as people age - and do not always
react well to age. Good management and a good staff go a long way to keeping
stores at their peak. Keeping grocery stores clean is not easy.

The Trader Joe's near here has a loyal clientele - but has a lot of competition.
We still have a Garner's which emphasized what was then referred to as "natural
foods" - and now there are three or four competitors in that "niche".

Ingles tends to have the lowest meat prices and the best meat cutters. Their
produce tends to be spotty and limited in choice. But there is a local farmers
market where you can find regional and some bulk produce. Over the past 20 years
or so the number of options rouond town have exploded.

Howie52
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<<Remember I'm the guy that worked at the UT Vet Hospital and used high powered hoses to clean animal manure which got volitized up in the air and then we'd breath it in and I'm pretty sure I probably ate at least 2 tablespoons of dog and cat manure every day so I got a high functioning immune system.

Catch my drift? I don't worry about a lot of stuff that normal people worry about. Most of the meat I buy has "manager special" stickers on it and is either closed to or completely out of date.

Art>>


I'm right there with Art on a lot of this. We throw out huge volumes of edible food because people want it to look perfect.


Personally, I look for the outdated cheap stuff, not just to save money, but to eat it rather than waste it.


I have a high regard for food. It's literally the gift of life, and we so often treat it like garbage.

Art has more exotic taste for wildlife than do I, but I have every respect for that.


In my experience women have a much more sensitive nose than do men. My theory is that women developed a sensitive nose in order to separate food that was really inedible from edible food. But most women don't use their nose that way any more. Instead they read the "sell by" date at Trader Joes, which doesn't have anything to do with food that's not edible.


Seattle Pioneer
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Why do we spend so much at Trader Joe's? Psychologist reveals why the store outsells rival Whole Foods by more than double - and it's all down to how much choice is on the shelves

Psychologist and author of the book, 'The Paradox of Choice,' Barry Schwartz has explained how Trader Joe's is raking in the money over its competitors

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6723417/Psychologis...


t
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<<Why do we spend so much at Trader Joe's? Psychologist reveals why the store outsells rival Whole Foods by more than double ->>


Trader Joes and Whole Foods both aim to support and cultivate the food and shopping prejudices of the fashionable middle and upper class. Trader Joes does that at a more affordable price than W@hole Foods.


Seattle Pioneer
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In my experience women have a much more sensitive nose than do men. My theory is that women developed a sensitive nose in order to separate food that was really inedible from edible food. But most women don't use their nose that way any more. Instead they read the "sell by" date at Trader Joes, which doesn't have anything to do with food that's not edible.

WOW sweeping generalizations much?

For a guy who eschews marriage or pretty much anything to do with women, you do seem to consider yourself an expert....

you're not.

Teri
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"Trader Joe's and Whole Foods both aim to support and cultivate the food and shopping prejudices of the fashionable middle and upper class. Trader Joe's does that at a more affordable price than W@hole Foods." - Seattle Pioneer
------------------------

My life's motto: "If it's not on sale I'm not buying."

The couple of times I've been to Trader Joe's I thought the food looked delicious, and I'm sure I'd enjoy eating it, only I'm too cheap to shop there. It was small portions in small serving sizes and those packages were rather expensive for me.

One store I go to downtown, UGO (United Grocery Outlet http://www.myugo.com/ ) is frequented mostly by poor people who are looking for real bargains. I bought a 1 lb box of organic baby spinach for $1.00 and a big box of mixed fancy lettuce for $1.00. Normal price for that sort of stuff is $3 or $4 bucks!

I bought Lindytoes three 1 lb chubs of Jimmy Dean Maple Flavored breakfast sausage for $1.79 each. I looked at Kroger's for the same stuff and it was over $3.00/each.


Art
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"I bought Lindytoes three 1 lb chubs of Jimmy Dean Maple Flavored breakfast sausage for $1.79 each. I looked at Kroger's for the same stuff and it was over $3.00/each.


Art "

***************************************

I thought chubs were a type of fish - but obviously there is an alternative
definition.

Howie52
So ----- what's chub?
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https://www.health.com/mind-body/5-surprising-ways-men-and-w...



<<For a guy who eschews marriage or pretty much anything to do with women, you do seem to consider yourself an expert....

you're not.

Teri>>



Once again we have someone making claims for the absolute equality between men and women, when in fact women DO have advantages in their sense of smell and such, as discussed in the link above.



I used to be a first responder for a gas utility when people complained about gas odors.

It was quite common to go out to someone's home and have the woman complaining about smelling a gas odor, while the man pooh poohed that, smelling nothing.

In the large majority of such conflicting claims, the woman was correct. Women quite commonly could smell things men just couldn't smell, and that could include me, too.


Men are statistically bigger and stronger than women, but women have their practical advantages too, however much liberals want to deny reality.



Seattle Pioneer
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<<"Trader Joe's and Whole Foods both aim to support and cultivate the food and shopping prejudices of the fashionable middle and upper class. Trader Joe's does that at a more affordable price than W@hole Foods." - Seattle Pioneer
------------------------

My life's motto: "If it's not on sale I'm not buying."

The couple of times I've been to Trader Joe's I thought the food looked delicious, and I'm sure I'd enjoy eating it, only I'm too cheap to shop there. It was small portions in small serving sizes and those packages were rather expensive for me. >>



I will admit to shopping at Trader Joes. The only thing I buy though are shelled sunflower seeds. I buy six or seven pounds at the cheap price of $1.99/pound.

I mainly buy them to sprinkle on salads, but I eat more than I should by the handful.

So the next time you wind up in a TJs, check out the nuts ----and I'm not talking about the customers.



Seattle Pioneer
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"Men are statistically bigger and stronger than women, but women have their practical advantages too, however much liberals want to deny reality." - Seattle Pioneer


The part of the brain that controls language and grammar is larger in women than in men. That is why little girls (usually) learn to talk before boys to and they generally (not always) do better in language related skills.

For men it is the part of the brain that has to do with spatial things that is larger which is why men tend to do better at spatial tasks like judging distance.

Language-associated cortical regions are proportionally larger in the female brain (PubMed)
by J Harasty - ?1997 - ?
Language-associated cortical regions are proportionally larger in the female brain. ... DESIGN AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Control neuropathological case ... the superior temporal gyrus (part of the Wernicke area) and its subdivisions ... Volume comparisons between the sexes and between brain hemispheres were ...
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9041858

Sex differences in brain structure in auditory and cingulate regions
by CC Brun - ?2009 - ?
In men, primary visual, and visuo-spatial association areas of the parietal lobes were proportionally larger ... Males are consistently found to have larger total brain volumes (TBVs) and ... have proportionally greater gray matter volumes, partly because substructures do ... sex differences in brain activation during both verbal and spatial tasks [6].
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2773139/

Art
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"I will admit to shopping at Trader Joes. The only thing I buy though are shelled sunflower seeds. I buy six or seven pounds at the cheap price of $1.99/pound." - SeattlePioneer


I buy 10 oz bags of shelled sunflower seeds at Aldis for $1.59. I'll have to do the math to see which is cheaper. The closest Trader Joe's to us is in Nashville which is about 38 miles away so I've only been over to Green Hills a couple of times.

$1.59/10 = 15.9 cents/lb

$1.99/16 = 12.44 cents/lb

Looks like your deal is better than my deal. :(

Oh well next time we're over there I'll look for the shelled sunflower seeds. I eat them very slowly but they are not horribly high in carbs.

Art
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the "sell by" date ... which doesn't have anything to do with food that's not edible.

You are preaching to the choir here.

This is one of my soapbox topics, and as someone who runs a local food bank, this makes me crazy.
I AM GIVING AWAY FOOD.
I would not distribute anything that I would not eat myself
(if it is an item I eat - like creamed corn, I wouldn't ever eat, but having 2015 on the can would not be the reason why) and yet I have folks who tell me that they wont take something because it is expired.

It is a:
BEST BY
Best Taste By
Freshest By
Sell By
date, not an expiration date, not a Turns immediately rancid 2 days after this Date.


peace & digressing
t
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however much liberals want to deny reality.

If you believe I'm a liberal, you have not been listening....

Teri
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<<the "sell by" date ... which doesn't have anything to do with food that's not edible.

You are preaching to the choir here.

This is one of my soapbox topics, and as someone who runs a local food bank, this makes me crazy.>>




My working assumption generally is that "The nose knows." Even the nose of a humble male.

There are occasions where appearance or other factors will outweigh that, but I have a good deal of trust in my nose.



Seattle Pioneer
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And furthermore, some women have a really good nose. Kin to bloodhounds, I'm guessing.


Well, not really. dogs and bloodhounds are at a whole more refined level of olfactory sensitivity.


I recall a veterinarian who waxed almost poetic of the smelling ability of dogs. However, I pointed out, "look where they put their noses."


Seattle Pioneer
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The only thing I buy though are shelled sunflower seeds. I buy six or seven pounds at the cheap price of $1.99/pound.

Exactly the same price I paid yesterday for sunflower hearts at the wild bird food store. Of course I'm not the one who will be eating those.
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It is a:
BEST BY
Best Taste By
Freshest By
Sell By
date, not an expiration date, not a Turns immediately rancid 2 days after this Date.


I've always thought of it as a cover-my-posterior date, as in after that date I don't have to be worried about being taken to court.
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Howie52 ~

A chub of meat:

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&q=what+is+a+ch...

I purchase some that are usually 3, 5 or 10 pound chubs. Separate and freeze.
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SP writes,

It was quite common to go out to someone's home and have the woman complaining about smelling a gas odor, while the man pooh poohed that, smelling nothing.

In the large majority of such conflicting claims, the woman was correct. Women quite commonly could smell things men just couldn't smell, and that could include me, too.


Men are statistically bigger and stronger than women, but women have their practical advantages too, however much liberals want to deny reality.

</snip>


Ladies, appreciate the complement. You'll be waiting a long time before you see another.

intercst
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I used to be a first responder for a gas utility when people complained about gas odors.

It was quite common to go out to someone's home and have the woman complaining about smelling a gas odor, while the man pooh poohed that, smelling nothing.


Called PG&E because the intermittent smell of gas was driving me crazy. They quickly identified that the issue was copper gas lines in the house. Which meant it was my problem and not theirs. At least they confirmed it wasn't my imagination.
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It was quite common to go out to someone's home and have the woman complaining about smelling a gas odor, while the man pooh poohed

Wait....what?
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In my experience women have a much more sensitive nose than do men.

WOW sweeping generalizations much?


Five of the first six Google search results for "do women have a greater sense of smell" shows that they do.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/30/well/family/why-stinky-so...

https://www.education.com/science-fair/article/do-women-have...

http://www.sirc.org/publik/smell_diffs.html
On standard tests of smelling ability – including odour detection, discrimination and identification – women consistently score significantly higher than men

https://www.bustle.com/articles/48277-women-have-a-better-se...
Women Have A Better Sense of Smell Than Men, Probably Because They Have More Brain Cells, Science Says

https://www.health.com/mind-body/5-surprising-ways-men-and-w...
[Women] tend to taste, smell, hear, see colors, and feel textures more accurately than men
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Art:

"You had me snickering and rolling on the floor. Soy milk and nut butters! LOL!"

I smiled, too, but, hey, to each his or her own - right?

We like regular skim milk and regular butter (unsalted for cooking).

As for the TJ thing, we don't have one near us, anyway, but we shop coupons and sales in Hannaford's, Price Chopper or Topps locally. My wife saves a bundle that way -- often about half. The bread outlet locally, especially, offers great deals on name brand breads, bagels and such, especially the last Friday of the month, when everything is 99 cents!

Coupons (store kind and manufacturer's) can save folks a lot; 20 minutes browsing those and then buying what's on sale is well worthwhile, in our opinion.

Vermonter
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I typically do my weekly big shopping at Trader Joe's and another trip elsewhere depending on what I need/want. Often whole foods to get produce or meat items I can't find elsewhere.

My faves at tj's...

+ I don't eat much dairy, but their prices are great. This Greek yogurt and cottage cheese are more delicious than others I've tried.

+ Great nuts & seeds in all sorts of styles...raw, roasted, whole, pieces. I make the most delicious cashew cream from their raw cashews. And pecans and walnuts, which are often rancid elsewhere, are always fresh.
F
+ only brand of frozen shrimp I like (IIRC from Argentina?).

+ great convenience foods like pre-made salads, frozen entrees and sides (we especially love the palaak paneer), fresh and frozen cauliflower rice, broccoli rice.

+ Very good produce, most available both organic & conventional, but not as big a variety as supermarkets or Whole Foods. But improving over time--now I can get fennel bulbs. Cheapest, best quality avocados, cheapest onions, great berries...

+ our fave kombucha fir less.

Mine is 4.5 miles away--and near Whole Foods--and one of their small footprint stores so we probably don't have all the stuff at our tjs that some of you do. Never seen free samples.

Yesterday I got salmon, lamb chops, pork tenderloin, and chopmeat on sale at whole foods.
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In and out of Trader Joe's this morning on my way to work. Grabbed a block of Kerrygold grassfed butter (for my office coffee) and several different types of olives for the occasional snacking urge.

Convenient, on my way, good price on the specific things I wanted.
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"Grabbed a block of Kerrygold grassfed butter"


<snicker!>

Art
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"Grabbed a block of Kerrygold grassfed butter"


<snicker!>


ArtYou can laugh Art but my Yellow Lab agrees with me. She's first in line for sample of my morning coffee.

As for me, I'll laugh all the way to the bank (err blood work review with my Doc -- seriously, the last two checkups he laughed as he read my results and mutter "freaking amazing").

My Omega 6:3 ratio in particular and sex hormones at (almost 59). Clean foods, including clean(er) butter is part of it all. All part of my larger (successful) efforts to avoid endocrine disruptors in foods, and things that go on my body/skin that have borne fruit in restoring sex hormones levels from "yawn, normal" to "Wow, freaking amazing" to quote my Doc.
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