Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 1
Which would, by itself, support our contention that some trades earn more than some degreed professions: at the very least, electrical linemen earn more on average than elementary-school teachers.

Not on a per-hour basis, which was the original contention to which you responded.


From the source - YOUR source, by the way - http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_nat.htm

Power-line installers have a median hourly pay of $24.41 for regular time. We provided documentation of a GROUP of these people who routinely earn more than $100,000 per year, which at 70 hours per week for 50 weeks comes to an average rate of $28.57.

Elementary school teachers have a mean annual pay of $48,700. At 50 hours per week (and the teachers I've known well enough to comment on, ALL worked longer hours than that) for 40 weeks that's $24.35 per hour worked.

Perhaps you need to consult one of them about which of these hourly rates is greater.

But I would add:

Construction managers move up from the TRADES of construction workers, more often than they come from college. They earn, directly reading of the BLS chart (so no allowance for overtime), $35.43 median per hour.

First-line supervisors of construction workers, even more likely to be promoted from the trades (actually, often an in-between position that both manages the trades and practices them): $25.89 median.

Elevator installers/repairmen: $30.59 median per hour.

Power-plant electrical-equipment repairmen: $27.60.

Power-plant operators: $26.44.

Gas-plant operators: $25.80.

Locomotive engineers $27.88.

Railroad conductors and yardmasters $26.70

Plainly, according to the BLS, there are trades that routinely get paid more for hour - STRAIGHT TIME - than some college-education-required jobs.

Yes, there are many more trades that get paid less. But the only one insisting on a universal statement was you.
Print the post  

Announcements

When Life Gives You Lemons
We all have had hardships and made poor decisions. The important thing is how we respond and grow. Read the story of a Fool who started from nothing, and looks to gain everything.
Contact Us
Contact Customer Service and other Fool departments here.
Work for Fools?
Winner of the Washingtonian great places to work, and Glassdoor #1 Company to Work For 2015! Have access to all of TMF's online and email products for FREE, and be paid for your contributions to TMF! Click the link and start your Fool career.