Skip to main content
No. of Recommendations: 0
I’m starting college and I have no idea what I want to study. Anyone love their job and would recommend it?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
How about we start with what your interests are. Surely you had interests in High School, subjects you enjoyed, things you were good at?

Fuskie
Who notes it doesn't matter if he loves his job or not if it's not something that your talented at...

-----
Premium Home Fool: Ask me a Foolish Question, I'll give you a Foolish Response!
Ticker Guide: The Walt Disney Company (DIS), Intuit (INTU), Live Nation (LYV), CME Group (CME), MongoDB (MDB), Trip Advisor (TRIP), Vivendi SA (VIVHY), Mimecast (MIME), Hain Celestial (HAIN), Royce Micro Capital Trust (RMT)
Disclaimer: This post is non-professional and should not be construed as direct, individual or accurate advice
Disassociation: The views and statements of this post are Fuskie's and are not intended to represent those of The Motley Fool or any other sane body
Disclosure: May own shares of some, many or all of the companies mentioned in this post (tinyurl.com/FuskieDisclosure)
Fool Code of Conduct: https://www.fool.com/legal/the-motley-fools-rules.aspx#Condu...
Invitation: You are invited to interactively watch Motley Fool Live online television: https://livechat.fool.com
Call to Action: If you like this or any other post, Rec it. Better yet, reply to it. Even better, start your own thread. This is YOUR TMF Community!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
What I tell my oldest child, who’s a few years behind you, is that there are lots of ways to make a living. What matters is that you find something legal that you enjoy, that you can take pride in, and that you can be satisfied with the lifestyle that it supports.

I happen to have two jobs that I enjoy very much. Neither of which bear much resemblance to my primary major in college (Electrical Engineering). My oldest thinks he wants to be a dentist or orthodontist, which never interested either my wife or myself.

Whatever you choose, recognize that there are a lot of miserable people in high paying jobs who are ‘stuck’ there due to high debt levels or high cost lifestyle choices. Also recognize that every career field has people who thrive in it, people who barely survive in it, and people who ultimately don’t work out in it. Certain fields might have higher average salaries than others, but even that’s no guarantee of success.

Take advantage of being undecided in your first year to take classes across multiple fields that might interest you. Consider applying for summer internships and ask your interviewers what they like most about their jobs and their companies. You’ll certainly learn something and might even get a job or a career field out of it.

Regards,
-Chuck
Discovery/HR Home Fool
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Did you really have to tell dd to keep it legal? What kind of a household are you running! :-)

Fuskie
Who notes majors don't have to be declared in your first year but if you have an idea of where your interests lie, you can make sure your coursework includes electives you find appealing as opposed to the requirements you are forced to take...

-----
Premium Home Fool: Ask me a Foolish Question, I'll give you a Foolish Response!
Ticker Guide: The Walt Disney Company (DIS), Intuit (INTU), Live Nation (LYV), CME Group (CME), MongoDB (MDB), Trip Advisor (TRIP), Vivendi SA (VIVHY), Mimecast (MIME), Hain Celestial (HAIN), Royce Micro Capital Trust (RMT)
Disclaimer: This post is non-professional and should not be construed as direct, individual or accurate advice
Disassociation: The views and statements of this post are Fuskie's and are not intended to represent those of The Motley Fool or any other sane body
Disclosure: May own shares of some, many or all of the companies mentioned in this post (tinyurl.com/FuskieDisclosure)
Fool Code of Conduct: https://www.fool.com/legal/the-motley-fools-rules.aspx#Condu...
Invitation: You are invited to interactively watch Motley Fool Live online television: https://livechat.fool.com
Call to Action: If you like this or any other post, Rec it. Better yet, reply to it. Even better, start your own thread. This is YOUR TMF Community!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
WHich subject reading/homework do you enjoy doing? Do you like research, running experiments, analyzing data, working closely with others, working by yourself? Do you prefer working with your hands or your brains--or both? Are you easily bored--do you need new experiences or new info to stay focused/interested/excited? Do you like creating new things, new ideas, meeting new people? Do you love any of the arts--and do you have art talent? When someone's injured or sick, are you the one who rushes in to help? Do you like organizing complex efforts? Do you like or dislike telling others what to do?

I'm a jack of all trades type who prefers to deal with information rather than people or things, prefers a changing environment, prefers to work as part of a group effort but do my actual work mostly alone and not have a lot of meetings, don't enjoy telling people what to do--in fact dislike hierarchy, somewhat creative but not enough to make a living in the arts, not enough stamina and not social enough to stand in front of a class all day, don't enjoy a high-stress environment, kinda squeamish about blood and stuff. Technical writing and editing worked for me. Analyze yourself.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
In my senior year of high school I found something I was good at, something that just came naturally, so I majored in that in college and worked in that field for 30+ years.

So I suggest you find something you are good at, that comes naturally for you.

Taking your question from another angle, keep in mind that a job can be terrible even if you are doing what you love. All it takes is a terrible boss or a toxic work environment. So besides finding something you are good at, put some effort into preparing yourself for what the working world will be like. For me, way back in the dark ages, the important step was reading Up The Organization, a book by Robert Townsend. It helped me get my head around aspects of corporate life I never would have had a clue about, and then spent 30 years in corporate life.

Today I suggest reading the Ask a Manager blog. That will expose more about what makes a good workplace than anything else I can imagine. When the time comes to get that career job you will be better equipped for that life than you would otherwise be. It is a great source of advice for getting a job too.
Print the post Back To Top