No. of Recommendations: 6
Answer: Too much religion and politics.

http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?siteid=mktw&dist=nwtam&guid=%7BDB28EE34%2D26A2%2D456B%2DBBA7%2D04866ABBDA3B%7D

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"So where do we go for answers? We align ourselves with political parties that make the X a little easier to grasp in certain terms, whether it's workers' rights or lower taxes. Trouble is, if you say preserving peoples' jobs is more important than saving a regional species of minnow, you're tarred a right-wing zealot. And if you say you don't mind the amount of taxes you're paying, you're branded socialist scum.

Yet as a people, we are on the same page more than ever before. How else do you explain a virtual dead heat in the presidential election and an almost equally divided Senate and House of Representatives? Chalk it up to the financial education we've gotten in the last 15 years.

We're now shrewder about money than any time in history, courtesy of lessons learned beginning in the mid-80s. The average American came to understand the dangers of federal budget deficits, the corruption that led to the savings-and-loan bailout, how wars are indeed fought over commodities such as oil, and the need to save for their own retirement, rather than relying on the oft-raided Social Security fund."


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No. of Recommendations: 3
Answer: Too much religion and politics.

It doesn't seem that schools shy away from teaching religion and politics...as long as it's the right kind of religion and politics.
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