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Zumba writes:
For example, Cree's products can be used in "last mile" broadband connections to homes, but probably wouldn't work for university or corporate campuses where more bandwidth is needed.


The gorilla sits at the end of the residential `last mile`. I`m drooling.

(also can`t find my quote or apostrophe key because I`m on a Japanese keyboard.)

The race to the last mile is full of competitors who are stumbling all over each other to fill it with various solutions such as an ethernet drop across your front yard, insecure cable modems, and other solutions that requre additional equipment to be added from the telco central office to the SLC to the remote location in your neighborhood. It is incredibly tough going, if nothing else because of installing remote equipment in unsecure outdoor locations and installing new plant.
In companies like Japan who have gone whole-hog with ISDN, wireless is the only hope for high-speed residential internet.

Whoever owns the last mile will be able to sit up and make everyone else take notice. I don`t know if CREE can do it alone, but they`ll at least be high on the value chain of this gorilla.
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marimba... thanks for the overseas reports. ;)

In companies like Japan who have gone whole-hog with ISDN, wireless is the only hope for high-speed residential internet.

What about cable? For instance:

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* EXCITE AT HOME CORP said that it is launching its high-speed Internet service in Japan. The company said its affiliate AtHome Japan is partnering with Jupiter Telecommunications Co. Ltd., the largest Japanese cable company, and trading company Sumitomo Corp to roll out the high-speed service in the Tokyo metropolitan area and northern Kyushu. In April, the company said it expects its overseas ventures to record about $80 million in total revenue this year, an increase of 300 percent over 1999. (Reuters 04:15 AM
ET 06/19/2000)
--------


Cheers,

orangeblood
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I've drifted off topic from CREE, but I wanted to comment further on internet access in Japan:


The question of cable internet access in Japan is interesting to me and one that merits further study. Internet access in general over there is a lot more limited than I expected, ISDN lines much more widespread than I knew, yet even in Akihabara I saw no residential cable modem gear. So something isn't adding up.

I suppose internet over CATV is a possible alternative in Japan. I tend to categorically discount the future of cable internet access because I believe it is inferior and unsecure to other access methods. Seeing as how the Japanese are so keen on engineering purity, wireless mania, and consensus adoption, I tend to see more future in wireless internet.

However, many a "superior" company has been blindsided by "inferior" products simply because the market conditions were favorable and the non-technical parts of the execution were aggressive and flawless (vis-a-vis the huge success of Microsoft). So perhaps it is inappropriate to discount internet over cable out of hand.


Original Message

Subject: Re: Wireless markets for CREE
Author: TMFOrangeblood Date: 6/20/00 2:38 AM Number: 2613
marimba... thanks for the overseas reports. ;)

In companies like Japan who have gone whole-hog with ISDN, wireless is the only hope for high-speed residential internet.

What about cable?

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I tend to categorically discount the future of cable internet access because I believe it is inferior and unsecure to other access methods.

Whew. An awful lot of people disagree with you. Probably too many for you to categorically discount it.


Seeing as how the Japanese are so keen on engineering purity, wireless mania, and consensus adoption, I tend to see more future in wireless internet.

I think at some point in the future everything will be wireless. In the U.S. that won't happen, I guess, until wireless can securely offer faster service at a cheaper price... rendering the telephone and cable wiring useless. That may be a long way off.

Cheers,

orangeblood
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