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The USA is stoopid regarding Public Health that we ignore as we rely far too much on privare medicine whether publicly or privately funded), and since we are the predominant power in the world some of our ignorance rubs off on everybody else.

The stupidity of not ramping up free vaccines for the poor of the world as the developed nations emerge from the horror of not being the least bit ready to deal with a world pandemic from an article in the Economist:

To get 70% of the planet’s population inoculated by April, the IMF calculates, would cost just $50 billion. The cumulative economic benefit by 2025, in terms of increased global output, would be $9 trillion, to say nothing of the many lives that would be saved.

But, of course, the possibility is somehow mostly the possibility of contemplation.

Our own health and the well being of the world economy and the fatness of our own wallets depends on Public Health for Everyone Everywhere. But gosh, doing public health just seems too generous and not cynical enough to be taken seriously...


David fb
(Who has seen this movie too many times starting with the suppression of efforts to even study let alone control the AIDS epidemic long ago, followed by each successive idiot re-do, culminating with the easily avoidable catastrophes of the last two years)
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That is a fantastic ROI, and a fantastic humanitarium endeavor. And the odds of getting the US behind this are, unfortunately, very small. And, I suspect, getting 70% of the world to take the vaccine won't happen either. (We can't seem to do it here.)

:(

Bill - contemplating turning down the A/C today due to ERCOT
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(Who has seen this movie too many times starting with the suppression of efforts to even study let alone control the AIDS epidemic long ago, followed by each successive idiot re-do, culminating with the easily avoidable catastrophes of the last two years)

Although this is parenthetical, it is also an important point. The US federal budget is about $4.8 trillion dollars. If we spend $50 billion vaccinating the world, that would be only 1% of the budget. And we could involve our ally partners to shoulder some of that cost.

Besides the ethical and humanitarian arguments that we can help and therefore should, we also get a direct economic benefit by quashing COVID as quickly as possible.

That means we're left with no reasons not to help. Sitting on the sidelines seems like an unforced error to me.
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Sitting on the sidelines seems like an unforced error to me.

"Sitting on the sidelines" is a bit misleading. The US and allies are donating a lot of vaccine, just not enough and not fast enough.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-06-13/the-g-7-s...
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Besides the ethical and humanitarian arguments that we can help and therefore should, we also get a direct economic benefit by quashing COVID as quickly as possible.

As they say, "all politics is local".

I remember the US government cutting off supply of condoms, as AIDS defense, to agencies in Africa, unless those agencies divorced themselves from other public health agencies that support abortion rights.

For decades, the US has distributed "food aid" to other countries, which hurt the local farmers in those countries who could not compete with free food from the US, but provided an outlet for product the US government bought up to support prices for the benefit of US farmers.

Steve
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