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Wrong calculation.

26.7/(108.2+26.7) = 19.8%


And actually, that's admissions not applicants.

For applicants, it's
41.3/(41.3+176.7) = 18.9%
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First of all, I have never been happy with the construction of the SAT. It allegedly consists of a math test and an English test. The problem is that it is actually two English tests. Any high school sophomore should be able to do the math (of all but a couple of questions which may be more advanced), but often the questions are posed in a format designed to catch the unwary. If you don't have a very high level of command of the English language, you won't understand the math question sitting in front of you. So, IMHO, the test is patently unfair to those who may be very good at math, but not at English.

That said, there are obvious differences in the quality of the educational background of students. If it is true that a properly prepared student will have a greater likelihood of success in a college environment, a standardized test is one way to weigh the likelihood that a candidate seeking to enter a school will succeed. With little correlation between many of the high school curriculums around the country, what should be used to filter out the best candidates?

Jeff
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Dropping the SAT/ACT should allow them to reduce the quantity of academically high-performing Asians in favor of whites with "athletic" or "Social Media" talents.

intercst
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If you don't have a very high level of command of the English language, you won't understand the math question sitting in front of you. So, IMHO, the test is patently unfair to those who may be very good at math, but not at English.

</snip>


At most engineering schools the Math SAT score is a lot higher than the English score. And engineers tend to be poor writers versus their Liberal Arts classmates.

intercst
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With little correlation between many of the high school curriculums around the country, what should be used to filter out the best candidates?

Demographics, athletics, personal connections, grade point average (sometimes inflated)?

Maybe everything will stay exactly the same, minus the illusion of merit-based admissions.

;-)
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One may reasonably expect that the number of applications will increase exponentially, since poor test scores will no longer count against students as they have in the past.

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That is a false assumption. Most applicants to University of California are from CA Junior Colleges after completing 2 years of University of California mandated courses. This provides them with your GPA which they can use to determine your admissions eligibility and status. Thus they do not need any sucking SAT/ACT.

The University of California does not want to be teaching basics to students for 2 years. Students get much better education for the first two years at a CA Junior College than they would get at University of California. I did not need to take the SAT/ACT to transfer from CA Junior College to UCLA. In fact they put me in the top tier of students for selecting classes because of my outstanding grades at the Junior College.

It is a system that work when I went to UCLA in the 1960s and still works today. They only used SAT/ACT for out of state students or students who did not meet the transfer requirements according to courses taken and GPA.

Jaak
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Most applicants to University of California are from CA Junior Colleges after completing 2 years of University of California mandated courses.

From 2019:
www.universityofcalifornia.edu/press-room/uc-admits-all-time...
The University of California announced today (July 22) that it has offered an all-time record number of incoming students a spot on at least one of its nine undergraduate campuses for the 2019-20 academic year....The university admitted 108,178 freshmen out of a pool of 176,695 students, including a record number of Californians (71,655). UC also accepted 28,752 transfers from a pool of 41,282 students, including the largest-ever class from the California Community Colleges (26,700).

26.7/108.2 = 25%

DB2
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Most applicants to University of California are from CA Junior Colleges after completing 2 years of University of California mandated courses.

From 2019:
www.universityofcalifornia.edu/press-room/uc-admits-all-time......
The University of California announced today (July 22) that it has offered an all-time record number of incoming students a spot on at least one of its nine undergraduate campuses for the 2019-20 academic year....The university admitted 108,178 freshmen out of a pool of 176,695 students, including a record number of Californians (71,655). UC also accepted 28,752 transfers from a pool of 41,282 students, including the largest-ever class from the California Community Colleges (26,700).

26.7/108.2 = 25%


Wrong calculation.

26.7/(108.2+26.7) = 19.8%
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No. of Recommendations: 1
Wrong calculation.

26.7/(108.2+26.7) = 19.8%


And actually, that's admissions not applicants.

For applicants, it's
41.3/(41.3+176.7) = 18.9%
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No. of Recommendations: 3
"That is a false assumption. Most applicants to the University of California are from CA Junior Colleges after completing 2 years of the University of California mandated courses. This provides them with your GPA, which they can use to determine your admissions eligibility and status. Thus they do not need any sucking SAT/ACT."

You speak the truth. The UC college system prefers students go to a junior college first then transfer to UC. The jr. colleges are better suited to getting students up to an academic level suitable for the UC system.

Also, warning, just because one gets into a UC there is no guarantee you're going to stay past the first year. As they will throw people out who don't cut it academically, unlike many paid for colleges.
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The UC college system prefers students go to a junior college first then transfer to UC. The jr. colleges are better suited to getting students up to an academic level suitable for the UC system.

Also, warning, just because one gets into a UC there is no guarantee you're going to stay past the first year. As they will throw people out who don't cut it academically, unlike many paid for colleges.

====================================

Yes, the first two years at UC puts you into huge lecture halls of 100-200 students and the only ones who help you are teaching assistants.

The JC's provide smaller classes with easy interaction with your instructor. That is why JC transfer do better in to last 2 years of UC than students that went all 4 years to UC.
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