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I'm just starting DS's taxes, and I notice that one of his W-2's has the wrong SSN. This was for 1 day of work, so we're not talking a lot of money. Is there anything that he or I need to do to fix this, or do I just report the income on his taxes and ignore the wrong SSN? It just feels like it's not going to match up somewhere in the IRS world.

Anything that needs to be done here?
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I'm just starting DS's taxes, and I notice that one of his W-2's has the wrong SSN. This was for 1 day of work, so we're not talking a lot of money. Is there anything that he or I need to do to fix this, or do I just report the income on his taxes and ignore the wrong SSN? It just feels like it's not going to match up somewhere in the IRS world.

It shouldn't be a problem unless Box 2 has an amount.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
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It shouldn't be a problem unless Box 2 has an amount.

Box 2 has $1.18, and it looks like he is getting a refund of just under $200.

As I look at it, I can see that 2 of the numbers in the SSN got transposed, but it's still wrong.

Suggestions?
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Box 2 has $1.18, and it looks like he is getting a refund of just under $200.

As I look at it, I can see that 2 of the numbers in the SSN got transposed, but it's still wrong.

Suggestions?


First, you might suggest to the little darling that he could have looked at his papers when they came in close to 2 months ago. Then there would have been plenty of time to contact the employer, point out the error, and get a corrected W-2.

File on paper.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
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First, you might suggest to the little darling that he could have looked at his papers when they came in close to 2 months ago.

I'm still working on raising this child, and he still needs help with finances. It is not unexpected with him, and I won't fault him for it. If anything, I should have looked, and I only just happened to notice it.

Then there would have been plenty of time to contact the employer, point out the error, and get a corrected W-2.

Contacting the employer is pretty easy (it was the golf club that we belong to and it would only take a phone call). Would this be the preferred method here? As he is getting money back, I could always opt for an extension if that makes sense. It's only MA that he owes the $20 to, but the feds owe him money.

File on paper.

Assuming I cannot get the W2 corrected, is the filing on paper option recommended because then I can include the W-2s and they can see that it all goes together? I'm just trying to understand the logic here.

I appreciate the help with this. I actually waited til this weekend to get his taxes done because he was scheduled to be home, and I need him to review what I do, and to sign the MA taxes because those do get filed by mail to avoid the $19.95 TT electronic filing fee.
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Assuming I cannot get the W2 corrected, is the filing on paper option recommended because then I can include the W-2s and they can see that it all goes together?

Chew got it.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
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those do get filed by mail to avoid the $19.95 TT electronic filing fee.

I have found that the MA online filing direct with the state is quick and easy. https://wfb.dor.state.ma.us/webfile/wsi/Public/Webforms/Logi...

= Megan
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