No. of Recommendations: 7
I was tickled to read Tim's epic voyage fund selling "the losing position" in YONG. Tim had pitched debates with me on the board over not have "material evidence" against YONG. And that situation still exists. So why sell?

Bill Mann did the same with MPEL. Sold it from the fund and the stock recovered in style playing on the original thesis.

At HG, from the posts, one could gather that Seth had more than 10% of CMG in his personal portfolio prior to its quadrupling. At HG portfolio, its allocation was 3%. I wonder what he did with his personal position. Did he sell partially or keep it all? HG kept it at hold for 2 years over a price range of 100-400. Never discussed the basis of hold. With each quarterly report, the valuation models kept getting updated.

I showed at the MDP board how if MDP had held on to its positions at the market's darkest hour in March 2009, the portfolio would have been $1.5M. They left $500K on the table on valuation models.

Why so much variance in newsletter management, personal finance management and portfolio/fund management?

All TMF portfolio and funds that I have seen so far can be beaten with dollar cost averaging with just SPY and VWO. They can be smashed with opportunistic cash allocation that involves buying more when they are trading much below historic mean.

My takeaway is that people who run newsletters are basically stock pickers and good analysts. Whether or not they can make money in their personal portfolio or with someone else's money based on the thesis they laid out is another story.

Here is to hoping that Nathan sets the first successful example of portfolio management.

Anurag
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Sad but mostly true. Hardly any Fool services are beating the market by enough to justify the transaction costs (which are never included). I'll be curious to see if any of the higher end services, like Alpha or Special Ops, do any better. But I don't think they have so far.

That must be part of the reason Fool has to keep rolling out new services--the old ones, on an annualized basis, are generally a shade ahead of the market or well behind.
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No. of Recommendations: 8
My takeaway is that people who run newsletters are basically stock pickers and good analysts. Whether or not they can make money in their personal portfolio or with someone else's money based on the thesis they laid out is another story.

That certainly matches my own reason for subscribing to MF services and how I use them. I only want stock suggestions, analysis of the businesses (and continued analysis of developments), and a judgment about whether the stock would be a good investment. I'll manage my own portfolio from there.

In fact, that gets to why MDP is of no value to me. For me it's not about the past performance, because I don't believe it's necessarily predictive about the future performance. It's that I already get everything in the above paragraph from the underlying service, so I don't need to pay any more to get another layer of advice.

I think the way people manage their portfolios is so individual to their own situations and personalities, that no portfolio service is going to suit you exactly. Then you end up not mirroring the portfolio exactly, so you are doing your own thing anyway. Why pay for that?

Jim
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No. of Recommendations: 1
I think the way people manage their portfolios is so individual to their own situations and personalities, that no portfolio service is going to suit you exactly. Then you end up not mirroring the portfolio exactly, so you are doing your own thing anyway. Why pay for that? -- Jim

It probably doesn't make sense for you or Anurag, but it continues to make sense to people who don't believe they understand investing well enough (correct assessment or not) and for those who say they don't want to spend the time. At least those are reasons I've seen expressed. The "time" issue might be related in some cases to the "understand investing" issue....

Rob
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Rob --

Of course, you are right. I was speaking solely from my own point of view, but clearly many others find value for exactly that reason, and the service would have ceased to exist long ago if that were not the case.

The other reason it makes sense is the educational value. The choices can be bewildering to some investors, and I think they benefit from seeing how a portfolio can be built and managed, and the considerations that go into that.

One thing about MDP that I think is really good is the fact that the number of holdings is relatively small. I think that mirrors the situation of a lot of investors in the earlier stages of their careers, so it's very instructive. And anything that teaches patience and discipline, which seems to be characteristic of the service, is tremendously helpful in getting started.

Yeah -- my point was just about why I wasn't planning to go forward with it, but I didn't mean to discourage others who could benefit by seeing a portfolio approach that could serve them well into the future.

My subscription to MDP is good into October, and even though I don't think I'll continue with it, I'm considering getting on the boards from now until then just to see if I can contribute something to the community. Why not take advantage of the opportunity?

Jim
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Rob,

Happy Fooliversary!

Bruiser
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No. of Recommendations: 0
Thanks, Bruiser.

Rob
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